Discuss Detroit DISCUSS DETROIT! Detroit's Coast Previous Next
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Young_detroiter
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Username: Young_detroiter

Post Number: 78
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 5:04 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If you get HIGH enough (or take the Detroit People Mover), you might see Windsor's coastline, according to this Detroit News article:

"Demand for the [People Mover], which completes a 2.9-mile loop every 13 or 14 minutes and boasts sweeping views of the city and Windsor coast, was so great during Super Bowl that visitors lined up outside Renaissance Center station for one and a half hours just to board, he said."

"Detroit's plan: Get Final Four fans talking, spending"
http://detnews.com/article/200 90326/BIZ/903260367/Detroit+s+ plan++Get+Final+Four+fans+talk ing++spending

Okay. So, maybe the Detroit River isn't really a river, after all. We accept that our fair "river" is actually a strait...perhaps, it is even something different. However, it is certainly not a sea. Therefore, "waterfront" or even the common, but erroneous "riverfront" would be acceptable - but "coast?"

Also, noteworthy is that our monorail is such a tourist attraction that there is the potential for people to wait over an hour in line for a ride. Our monorail has the demand of a roller coaster! That's just neat!
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 4332
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 5:28 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There is some debate over whether it is a true strait or not, because straits usually connect two bodies of water at the same elevation and that are basically the same body of water (think the Straits of Mackinaw).

But, it is most definitely a river, since it has a slight gradient, if even calling it a strait is ambiguous, so, it could definitely be called a riverfront. Yeah, but you're right about the fact that it's definitely not a coast.
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Sumas
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Username: Sumas

Post Number: 851
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 6:21 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Coast just means shoreline. Shoreline means waters' edge.
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Retroit
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Username: Retroit

Post Number: 1054
Registered: 04-2008
Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 10:50 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

coast: land alongside the sea; seashore

(source: Webster's Umpteenth Edition)
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Lilpup
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Username: Lilpup

Post Number: 5437
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 11:05 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

perhaps it's being used in the obsolete sense: the boundary or border of a country
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Detroitnerd
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Username: Detroitnerd

Post Number: 3738
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 26, 2009 - 11:09 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

They should have said shoreline, right? That would have been my choice. Maybe people are just too used to saying East Coast and West Coast and now "Third Coast." At this rate, within 25 years words will mean anything you want to, and it'll be a magical land with fairies and gumdrops! :-)
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Retroit
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Username: Retroit

Post Number: 1074
Registered: 04-2008
Posted on Friday, March 27, 2009 - 2:21 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How would you define "fairies"?



(just kidding! - no response required)
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Wpitonya
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Username: Wpitonya

Post Number: 95
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Friday, March 27, 2009 - 2:59 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree that "coast" can be used to describe the water's edge, but they used the term "monorail." This is incorrect.
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Rustic
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Username: Rustic

Post Number: 1170
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Friday, March 27, 2009 - 3:21 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Detroitnerd, no need to be sooo littoral ...
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Bobl
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Username: Bobl

Post Number: 697
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Friday, March 27, 2009 - 4:20 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I just call it a beautiful thing that has been hidden and abused.
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Dtowncitylover
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Username: Dtowncitylover

Post Number: 538
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, March 27, 2009 - 4:52 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Montrealers call their Mont-Royal "La montagne", "the mountain", when it is not in the same league as the Rockies. We have every right to call it a river.
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Alan55
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Username: Alan55

Post Number: 2632
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Friday, March 27, 2009 - 5:08 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

LMichigan, calling it the "Detroit River" is a contradiction in terms, since the french term "detroit" means "strait", or "by the straits".

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