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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1109
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 24.223.133.177
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 12:44 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is a current Google Sanborn map of 7620 Dexter in Detroit the location of the Polish Consul back in the 1940's and the red X marks the spot.

dexter

Livedog2
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Jasia
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Username: Jasia

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2006
Posted From: 65.29.125.253
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 8:00 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have to jump in here and tell you all what a great thread of messages you've put together. I'm thrilled to see people contributing their knowledge and resources about the old Detroit Polish community.

I am the webmaster for several websites about the very areas you are discussing. My main web site is "Polish Ancestry", (http://polishancestry.com) a site for and about researching Polish ancestors who immigrated to Detroit. I have also done the web sites for:
St. Albertus (http://stalbertus.org)
Sweetest Heart of Mary (http://sweetestheartofmary.org)
St. Josaphat (http://stjosaphatdetroit.org)
And I have a blog that is about genealogy and photography but you'll find that most of the articles on it are about Detroit resources for Polish genealogy research. You can check it out at: http://creativegene.blogspot.c om.

In addition to my web sites and my blog, I have just started a Wiki for genealogy at http://genealogy.wetpaint.com/. Genealogists would be very excited about the information you're discussing and I would like to invite you all to contribute to the Wiki.

For those of you not familiar with a Wiki, it's essentially an online encyclopedia of sorts that is built by contributors like yourself. All you have to do is click on the link "Early Polish Community of Detroit" in the column on the left of the home page, and then click on "add a sub-page" and you'll get your own page to upload to. Then others can add to it or comment on it. Create as many pages on the topic as you like!

I am absolutely not trying to take contributors or information away from this message board. This is just be an additional place you could post more detailed information or stories on your topic. And it is more easily indexible for the search engines to list it. For instance, you could upload an old photo or map and write an entire page of information about it (or just a paragraph ;-), then reference that article and photo here on this message board... maybe with a thumbnail of your photo. I hope you'll consider utilizing this venue. It will allow you to spell check, use different fonts, upload your images, even include video, so it's a much more versatile format. I'd love to see your contributions help build the wiki. Hornwrecker, Livedog2, please consider sharing the photos and maps you've posted here on the wiki as well. And that goes for the others of you who have shared here. You're welcome to post that same information on the wiki as well.

I was born in Detroit but have always lived in the suburbs. I'm not old enough to have memories of the old Polish neighborhoods like you all do. But I sure do appreciate reading about them! Thanks!
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Jasia
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Username: Jasia

Post Number: 2
Registered: 09-2006
Posted From: 65.29.125.253
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 10:28 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'd like to put out a request for any information about the Polonia Baking Company. It used to be located at 5100 30th Street (corner of 30th and Herbert streets) on the west side. If anyone has any photos, advertisements, stories, rememberences, etc. I would really appreciate knowing about them. The bakery was owned by my grandfather from about 1917-1937.

Also, I'm looking for a copy of the parish jubilee book from Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary parish that used to be on Lovett street (also on the west side). I would like to scan the book if possible and would appreciate it if anyone can put me in touch with someone who has a copy. It was published in 1937. Thanks!
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Stephanie
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Username: Stephanie

Post Number: 9
Registered: 06-2006
Posted From: 68.43.106.62
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 10:37 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A few of the things I remember from the good old days...

The Citizen newspaper when half was published in English, half in Polish. My dad would send me to the corner store to pick it up for him on Wednesdays.

Christmas Eve. There would be a huge feast at my Grandmother's house every year. The tables would be covered in white tablecloths, and whtie dinnerware. Wafers on hay to be broken with each family member before we sat down to eat, which wasn't until after the first star was seen. Christmas carols sung afterward. It wasn't until I was in my 20s that I found out that what we were celebrating was called Wigilia. I got curious to see what I could find on the web and came across this http://www.polishamericancente r.org/Wigilia.htm. That pretty much summed up the Christmas Eve of my youth to a T.

Just like Ordinary, I can remember the adults switching to Polish to talk about things little ears didn't need to hear! I still intend to learn the language one day, I swear.
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1110
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 24.223.133.177
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 12:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is a photo of a 75th Anniversary pendant celebrating seventy-five (75) years of service of the Polish Roman Catholic Union to the Polish Community. On the obverse side there are crossed Polish and American flags to symbolize friendship and unity between the United States and Poland; The Polish Eagle below the crossed flags symbolizing strength and honor; and, the sacred heart symbolizing our Polish spirituality and belief in God. The reverse side there is an inscription that says, “Souvenir Polish Roman Catholic Union of America 1873 – 1948”

polish

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1111
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 24.223.133.177
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 1:07 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is some of the history of the PRCU and how it relates to the significant contribution the Detroit Polonia made to the entire Polish Diaspora in the U.S. We certainly have good reason to be proud of our ancestors and their contributions to maintaining our culture and at the same time fitting into the larger society called the American culture quilt.

Early PRCUA History

In June, 1873, Rev. Theodor Gieryk wrote open letters in Polish language newspapers encouraging Poles in America to unite in a national organization to protect Polish immigrants from discrimination and to preserve their cultural heritage and identity. This idea was warmly received by Jan Barzynski, editor of the “Pilgrzym” Polish newspaper in Washington, Missouri - one of the oldest Polish language newspapers in America. Mr. Barzynski enthusiastically promoted Fr. Gieryk’s idea. Thus, on October 3, 1873, Fr. Theodor Gieryk, Jan Barzynski, Peter Kiolbasa, John Glosowski, Rev. Vincent Barzynski, C.R. (Jan Barzynski’s brother), Fr. Leopold Moczygemba, Fr. Joseph Dabrowski and others met at St. Albertus Parish in Detroit, Michigan. This meeting brought about the establishment of the PRCUA, a fraternal organization for Polish Americans of the Roman Catholic faith, whose motto was established as “For God and Country”.

The first goals of the organization were:

to build Polish churches and schools,
to promote adherence to the Roman Catholic religion, and the religious and cultural traditions of the Polish nation,
to give fraternal assistance to Poles,
to take care of widows and orphans,
to help Poland to become an independent country again,
to establish “Pilgrim” as the official organ of the organization.

From the beginning, information about the PRCUA was disseminated in the “Pilgrzym”. However, in 1886 the “Gazeta Katolicka” became the official publication of the PRCUA. In 1888, the name of the weekly PRCUA newspaper was changed to “Wiara i Ojczyzna.” The latter two newspapers were published in Chicago. At the 1896 PRCUA National Convention held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the delegates decided that the organ of the organization would be called “Narod Polski” which has remained the official publication of the PRCUA to this day. The first issue of the Narod Polski appeared in January of 1897.

The newspaper was published weekly until 1946 when it changed to the current semi-monthly schedule. Between 1921 and 1939 the PRCUA also published a daily newspaper called “Dziennik Zjednoczenia” which was printed in a print shop at the home office in Chicago in the area of the current Social Hall. Narod Polski was published entirely in the Polish language and covered local and worldwide news of interest to the Polish American community, as well as fraternal news. In the 1970s the newspaper’s format was gradually changed from mostly Polish to half English, half Polish. Currently the Narod Polski has a circulation of approximately 27,000 and is mailed to members nationwide.

As a result of these articles, Father Gieryk called for at meeting at his parish in Detroit, Michigan on October 3, 1873. In attendance at this meeting were many of the religious and civic leaders of the Polish American community, including: Rev. Leopold Moczygemba, founder of the Polish immigrant settlement in Panna Maria, Texas, in 1854 and the oldest Polish Church in America - the settlement’s Immaculate Conception Parish, as well as Superior of the Conventual Franciscan Missionaries in Texas from 1856-58 and First Commissary General of the Conventual Franciscans (1858-1866)

Father Leopold Gieryk (1837-1878), one of the founders of the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America, was a remarkable man. He served as the PRCUA’s first President from 1873-75. Born in 1837, in the Prussian section of partitioned Poland near Marienwerder, he served as a chaplain in the Prussian army. In 1872, Father Gieryk immigrated to the U.S.A. along with many Poles who were refugees of Otto Von Bismarck’s Kulturkampf. Years of repression and religious persecution instilled in these émigrés a strong sense of nationalism and they were determined to maintain their ethnic identity in America. These strong ties to their native language and customs targeted the Poles for discrimination, particularly during the economic depression of 1873 which had devastating effects on the poor immigrants.

Ethnic parishes helped their members to a certain degree by serving as buffers between the Old World immigrants and the new American society, with all its strange customs and beliefs, within which the Poles had to function. Although many groups tried to address the problems at the local level, with the large wave of Polish immigrants who settled in many different regions of the United States in the late 1800s, it became apparent that a national organization was needed. Fr. Gieryk was among the earliest advocates of such a national organization.

In 1873, Father Gieryk became pastor of St. Albertus parish in Detroit, Michigan, which was founded just three years earlier. Much of Father Gieryk’s time was spent arranging for the initial building of the church, collecting funds for building and administering to the needs of the Polish immigrants who comprised his parishioners. He was moved by the generosity of his parishioners, despite their meager means. Fr. Gieryk was driven by the desire to do something to help his parishioners protect themselves against discrimination in this “land of the free and home of the brave.” He also wanted to encourage them to preserve their native language and customs, despite the inevitable assimilation into American society.

Beginning in June of 1873, Fr. Gieryk wrote open letters to all the Polish language newspapers in the United states, urging the leaders of various Polish American communities to ban together into a national organization for their mutual benefit. One of Fr. Gieryk’s strongest supporters was Jan Barzynski, editor of the “Pilgrzym” Polish language newspaper published in Washington, Missouri. He published a series of Father Gieryk’s letters in his newspaper, and gave his idea much media coverage.

As a result of these articles, Father Gieryk called for at meeting at his parish in Detroit, Michigan on October 3, 1873. This meeting led to the establishment of the PRCUA.

The following year, the first national Convention of the PRCUA was held in Chicago and father Gieryk was elected national president. At this convention, the group issued a statement of its purposes which included preserving the Catholic faith and national spirit of Polish Americans and passing on these values to future generations. Participants also voted on establishing a bank, hospital, local libraries, teachers’ seminary and other institutions of higher education for Polish Americans.

Father Gieryk stressed the need to maintain the group’s Catholic identity and this special apostolate to Polish immigrants was placed under the patronage of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. The religious tone of the organization lent special support to Polish clergy who often had to struggle to maintain their ethnic parishes, which were opposed by some of the church hierarchy. This was viewed by Fr. Gieryk as a threat which could lead to the total assimilation of Polish priests into the American way of life.

The Convention made Father Gieryk come away from the meeting with a great sense of support by the participants. He was so optimistic and hopeful for the organization, that he left his pastorship to devote himself fulltime to the very time-consuming affairs of establishing this national organization in accordance with the wishes of the delegates at the First Convention.

There were other segments of the Polish American community who did not want the clergy to be part of this fraternal organization and who did not want the Roman Catholic religion to play such an important part in the organization’s foundation. These groups broke away from the original group to found other non-religious Polish American fraternal organizations, such as the Polish National Alliance.

Father Gieryk had taken upon his shoulders a formidable task. Not only was he battling the church hierarchy in Detroit and the various factions which wanted the organization to go in a different direction from that proposed by Father Gieryk, but he was also troubled by poor health which was rapidly deteriorating.

(Something happened that the Resurrectionists came into power in the organization was Fr. Gieryk was “excluded from further leadership roles in the PRCUA.”) In an attempt to lead a more peaceful, less stressful life, Father Gieryk decided to move to the newly-forming rural town of Radom, Illinois, where he hoped to continue his ministry and regain his health.

At that time, Civil War hero General John Turczyn was recruiting Polish immigrants for the Illinois Central Railroad to settle in southern Illinois. He arrived there in April of 1875, when St. Michael’s Parish had just marled its first anniversary. There was no rectory and Radom fell far short of the “paradise” promised in Illinois Central advertisements. So Father Gieryk, St. Michael’s first resident pastor, moved into the near-by barracks of the railroad workers.

Once again, Father Gieryk became deeply concerned about the spiritual and material welfare of his people. He learned that the people were buying land and farming it, but they didn’t hold the deeds. Father Gieryk started asking people where their deeds were and told them they should have the titles for their land. When the land agent heard about all of this, he called the people together and vehemently assured them of his honesty. The agent then told the people that their new pastor was a troublemaker and they should get rid of him if they new what was good for them. Thus, In April of 1876, Father Gieryk was asked to leave Radom.

Father Gieryk served in Berlin, Wisconsin, for a short time, then he returned to southern Illinois. He was offered a parcel of land by the Louisville and Nashville Railroad to establish a church about 14 miles northeast of Radom. Thus he moved to this farm in Jefferson County and served German Catholics living in the vicinity. He never built a church, though. In late September, he became critically ill.

Father Dezyderjusz Liss, OSF, brought him the Sacraments and on his deathbed Father Gieryk forgave the people of Radom for any hurt they caused him, according to the Radom parish history published in 1924 on the occasion of the dedication of the present church. Father Theodor Gieryk died on November 3, 1878, at the age of 41 years. His grave was marked by a small tombstone placed by his housekeeper, Matilda Stryzyzewska.

On May 31, 1937, hundreds of PRCUA members gathered at Radom to honor our co-founder at the unveiling of a 14-foot high granite cross which the PRCUA erected at Fr. Gieryk’s gravesite.

At the gravesite, the then PRCUA Vice Chaplain Fr. Paul Janeczko praised Father Gieryk’s zeal and understanding for the temporal concerns of his people. “With all of his heart, Fr. Gieryk sought the good fortune and progress of the Polish people. He looked to the future. Therefore his works have such a profound meaning for all Polish people in America.” Fr. Janeczko said.

The impact of Fr. Gieryk’s ministry was further recognized in 1970 when the pioneer priest’s remains were exhumed and transferred to the Honor Section of the cemetery located in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, at the National Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa.

Rev. Vincent Barzynski - introduced an insurance system in 1886.

Rev. Leopold Moczygemba, President from 1875-80 (1824-1891) - was born in 1824 in Wieka Pluznica, Poland, in the Opole Region of Poland that was under Prussian rule at that time. He was ordained a priest in the Order of Friars Minor Conventual at Pesaro, Italy, in 1847. He continued his higher education in Germany after ordination. In 1852, Bishop J. M. Odin, the First Bishop of Texas, visited the Franciscan Monastery in Bavaria, Germany, to recruit missionaries. Among the five friars who accepted this missionary call to America was Father Leopold Moczygemba, age 27. The pioneer band of missionaries arrived at the Port of Galveston, Texas, in the early summer of 1852. They were entrusted with 4 parishes and 12 missions serving German Catholics.

Fr. Moczygemba wrote glowing reports to his family in Poland about the numerous new opportunities of America - freedom and abundance of everything which was denied them in Europe. Silesia at that time was a region of great poverty, rising food prices, rampant cholera and typhus epidemics and an oppressed people under the yoke of the Prussian rulers who longed for freedom. He encouraged his family to come to America. As a result, more than 100 families from Upper Silesia sold their possessions and boarded a vessel headed for Galveston, Texas. Altogether, there were about 800 men, women and children who decided to take the priest’s advice. They brought with them plows, farm implements, bedding, kitchen utensils and even a large cross from their old parish church. Their voyage lasted 9 weeks. They landed at the port of Galveston, Texas, on December 3. They then proceeded down the coast to Indianola, a smaller port and journeyed another three weeks on foot and on carts to San Antonio, arriving there on December 21. Fr. Moczygemba met the party there and he led them 55 miles southeast to the junction of the San Antonio River and the Cibolo Creek, to a place chosen by Father Moczygemba as their future settlement - the new village of Panna Maria, Texas. The immigrant group arrived at a site on December 24, 1954. Under the historic oak tree, Fr. Leopold offered Mass with the settlers and thus established the oldest Polish settlement in the United States.

At first the peasants lived in dugouts, in grass huts or under the spreading oak trees. In time they build more substantial wooden and stone buildings. A year later, in early December 1855, bad weather set in. It started with a series of cold, wet periods which lasted until March of 1856, then it was followed by 14 months of the most severe droughts Texas ever suffered in its entire history. All the vegetation disappeared altogether, crops and livestock were lost and the Silesians had to use their life savings in order to stay alive. Had it not been for the wild game in the area, many would have died of starvation. Many families left the area to go to American cities and seek work. The drought not only destroyed the economic prospects for the immigrants, but it also destroyed their faith in their spiritual leader.

Just as the Israelites murmured against Moses after he led them out of Egypt, so too the settlers had become openly hostile to the spiritual leader who had urged them to come to such a desolate wilderness. Family legend says at one point Fr. Leopold’s brother, Joseph, wanted to return to Poland. The missionary reportedly threw Joseph’s passport into the fire to prevent a breakaway from the colony. His brothers Joseph, John, Anton and August, and several cousins, remained in Texas while his parents and brother, Franciszek cancelled their plans to come to America. Another story relates how the colonists broke out in open hostility against the priest who brought them there. One group wanted to hang him and the other group wanted to drown him in what little water remained in the San Antonio River.

~~~This is the end of part 1, part 2 will be in my next post

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Post Number: 1112
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Posted From: 24.223.133.177
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 1:08 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Part 2 of 2 parts on the PRCU

Father Moczygemba had just completed the building of Immaculate Conception Church in Panna Maria which became the oldest Polish Church in America. In 1856, the cross brought from Poland by the settlers was erected before the main door of the new church and blessed by its pastor, Fr. Moczygemba.

Fr. Moczygemba, now 32-years-old, was pulled in many directions. On the one hand he felt responsible for the settlers and their welfare, but they needed food and all he could offer were prayers. On the other hand their discontentment with him was something that could not be ignored. As a later pastor among them summoned up the situation succinctly: “They complained and cursed the priest so strongly that he had to escape.” He repeatedly wrote to Rome requesting a Polish priest to take charge of the settlement. In October 1856, right after the dedication of the church, Fr. Moczygemba left Panna Maria and went to Castroville. He remained there until 1857 when he left Texas only to return for brief visits in later years.

In 1856 he was appointed as Superior of the Conventual Franciscan Missionaries in Texas, a position which lasted for 2 years. In 1858, Fr. Moczygemba became the First Commissary General of the Conventual Franciscans, a position which he held until 1866. In 1858 he left for Europe on the first of several such trips he would make in his lifetime. He went to Rome and also visited his family in Silesia and raised funds for the missions in America. He recruited several priests to return to America with him and in November of 1858 they arrived in New York. Fr. Moczygemba received a letter from the Bishop of Albany which proposed the possibility of having the friars work among the German immigrants in his diocese. Fr. Leopold agreed and in March of 1859, the bishop transferred two urban parishes to the friars. Fr. Leopold founded the first motherhouse of the Order in the U.S.A. in Syracuse, New York, and parishes in Utica and Syracuse for the large German-speaking immigrant population.

In the meantime, funds solicited by Fr. Moczygemba in Europe began reaching the missions in Texas and Father Francis Gatti was appointed as superior of the Texas missions, where he and another priest were sent to minister to the needs of the Silesians. In 1860 Fr. Moczygemba sent priests to Louisville, Kentucky, where they established St. Peter’s Parish. Two years their order received charge of the nearby St. Anthony’s Parish in Jeffersonville, Indiana. During the Civil War, he was concerned with wartime inflation and keeping his seminarians from being conscripted into the Army, so much of his time was spend fundraising.

In the winter of 1863-64, Peter Kiolbassa, a handsome 27-year-old Union Army officer came to Chicago to spend his furlough. Shortly after his arrival, Kiolbassa involved himself in the Polish community’s affairs to establish a Polish parish. During his Chicago furlough, Kiolbassa contacted his close friend, Rev. Leopold Moczygemba and suggested that the priest come to Chicago. Peter Kiolbassa arranged to have Fr. Moczygemba make his first trip to Chicago to hear the Easter confessions of 30 German families at St. Boniface Church and the Polish community, where a chronicler noted that “the Polish community received Father Leopold with vivid joy and elevated spirits.” He was the first Polish priest to minister in Chicago. He made contacts in the city which became helpful in later years. His contact with Peter Kiolbassa would lead to Fr. Moczygemba’s involvement with the founding of the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America.

From 1868-70 Fr. Moczygemba served in Rome. In 1870 he traveled back to America and took charge of St. Mary’s Church in Litchfield, Illinois. There his top priority was to establish a Catholic school for German immigrant families who moved into the area to work on the railroad. He moved out of the rectory and transformed it into a combination school and convent for the Ursuline Sisters from Alton, Illinois.

Fr. Moczygemba hoped to be appointed Bishop of Montana but his appointment was frustrated by the local bishop who would not support his election. He moved to St. Joseph’s parish in Terre Haut, Indiana for a year and then to At. Anthony’s Parish in Jeffersonville, Indiana in 1875, where he stayed for 2 years.

During the 1870s, Fr. Moczygemba devoted more and more of his time to activities with members of the Polish community in America, which he continued until the time of his death. He had been present at the founding meeting of the PRCUA in Detroit, and some accounts even declare that he served as Chairman of this meeting. In 1875, at the third PRCUA convention. in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Fr. Moczygemba was elected as President of the PRCUA. He was friends with Rev. Joseph Dabrowski who discussed with him the idea of founding a Polish teacher’s college and seminary for training young men for the priesthood.

Fr. Moczygemba wrote to the superior of the Congregation of the Resurrection, a nationalistic Polish religious order, reporting to him that due to an increasing immigration of Poles to America there was a great need for more members of his order in the US. Under Fr. Moczygemba’s leadership, the PRCUA sponsored the settlement of Polish immigrants in central Nebraska on lands being offered for sale by the Burlington and Missouri Valley railroad. Jan Barzynski was one of the land agents involved in this settlement. In 1877, about 300 families located in the area of Sherman and Howard Counties and this area became the proposed site for the planned seminary that had been discussed.

Side note: In 1876 Father Moczygemba rescued one of the pioneer Polish Catholic newspapers in the U.S. “Gazeta Polska Katolicka” by donating to it $2,500 from his own personal funds.” This newspaper later became the official publication of the PRCUA.

In 1878, Fr. Moczygemba made his final trip to Europe. He went to Rome to secure Papal endorsement for his plans to found a college or seminary for the Poles in America and to transfer from the Friars Minor Conventual with whom he was having personal problems, to the Polish Congregation of the Resurrection. Father Moczygemba submitted two undated petitions to Pope Leo XIII, one in Latin and the other in Italian requesting permission to establish a college/seminary. In Latin he used the work “collegium” and in Italian the word “seminario”. The Holy father approved both petitioned on January 14, 1879.

Fr. Moczygemba successfully transferred to the Congregation of the Resurrection who suggested he be sent to Chicago to work with the Polish immigrants. In 1880 he returned to America, arriving in New York and traveling by train to Chicago, where he spent the next two years at St. Stanislaus Kostka Parish on the near north side of Chicago. He described his life in Chicago thusly: “Father Wincenty Barzynski takes care of the parish and I care for the house, brothers and postulants. We have 4 brothers, 3 Polish and 1 Italian, and 2 postulants, young Poles, and it seems that they are good boys. I assist in the parish as much as I can.”

At this same time, problems arose in Nebraska. The colony was not prospering, and the Resurrectionists admitted they lacked sufficient financial support for the educational venture there. Nevertheless, Fr. Moczygemba continued to support the effort, even buying 380 acres of land for the site of the proposed school with his own funds. In 1882, he became pastor of St. Alphonsus Church in Lemont, Illinois, a combined congregation of 175 German families and 350 Polish families. Although they constituted the minority, the Germans owned the church building and controlled parochial affairs at the parish. Therefore, Fr. Leopold set about establishing a completely separate congregation for the Poles, Ss. Cyril and Methodius Parish, while administering to the spiritual needs of the Germans as well.

He purchased 20 acres of land on a hilltop in Lemont and deeded a portion of this to the Diocese of Chicago for a church building. he sold the remaining acreage to local Poles as residential lots around the church and called the subdivision Jasna Gora. He called a meeting of all Poles in the area and assessed each family a specific sum to be contributed to the church’s building fund. The cornerstone was laid in August 1883.and the building was sufficiently complete for the first Mass to be held there in April 1884.

Fr. Leopold was visited by his nephew, Rev. Leopold Moczygemba, called “Jr.”, who celebrated his first solemn Mass as a priest there in June of 1884. He was born in San Antonio, Texas, to Leopold’s brother Anton in 1859. His other brother, Joseph, also had a son who became Monsignor Thomas J. Moczygemba, who served the Archdiocese of San Antonio all his life. After a few months, the young priest returned to Lemont to assist his aging uncle for the remainder of his tenure in the parish.

In 1884 Fr. Moczygemba health began to fail and he transferred to Father Joseph Dabrowski the major role in bringing plans for a seminary to fruition, but he remained associated with the effort until its completion.

Fr. Dabrowski decided it would be more advantageous to shift the proposed location for the seminary from Nebraska to Detroit, Michigan, which was fast becoming a largely Polish populated area. The Bishop of Detroit gave his formal approval the two clergymen began fundraising efforts. In August of 1884 Fr. Moczygemba sold his land in Nebraska and secured $5,800 which he gave as a loan to the Diocese of Detroit to purchase the land. According to the still-preserved agreement, he did not expect repayment of the principal, but rather to be allowed to “live and reside in the aforesaid Polish Seminary” and to receive interest in the amount of 4% annually as a stipend for his expected retirement.

Fr. Moczygemba also contributed substantially from his own funds to establish the seminary. In a letter he wrote in 1886, Fr. Leopold discussed his efforts in the seminary venture: “... Here I must add that if it were now for my funds, the Seminary would never have existed. When I made a good beginning [with donated funds], the others joined with their work and considerable funds/ Otherwise they would never have given their support.” he attended the laying of the cornerstone of Ss. Cyril and Methodius Seminary in 1885, which also coincided with the millennium of the great Slavic missionaries (885-1885). The seminary was dedicated in 1886.

Fr. Moczygemba remained in Lemont until 1887, when he moved to the Polish Seminary. In 1888 he petitioned for perpetual secularization, which was approved, and spent the remainder of his life as a secular priest in the Detroit Diocese.

From 1887 through 1889, Fr. Leopold lived in the Detroit area, teaching at the seminary and serving as chaplain for the Felician Sisters in Detroit and the Sisters of Charity in nearby Dearborn. He was unhappy with his treatment in Detroit, feeling that he was not treated with proper respect. Therefore in July of 1889 he secured a temporary position as pastor of St. Mary’s Church is Parisville, Michigan, the oldest Polish settlement in the state. He served there until June of 1890. Then he moved to officiate at St. Stanislaus Church in rural Hilliard, now Dorr, Michigan, from October 1890 to January 1891. He became very ill and complained that “the Michigan cold is killing me.” In January 1891, he was unable to continue his priestly duties at Hilliards, so he returned to Dearborn where he spent the next few weeks growing weaker and more ill. He died on February 23, 1891 at the age of 65 years. He was quietly buried in the priest’s lot at Mount Elliott Cemetery in Detroit and mourned throughout the Polish American community. In his will be gave the remainder of his estate to the Diocese of Detroit for the support of the seminary.

Fr. Moczygemba’s mortal remains lay there for 83 years beneath an undistinguished faded tombstone. In 1972, the pastor of Panna Maria, Texas, made a pilgrimage to Detroit to view the gravesite of Fr. Moczygemba. He was shocked to find that not a single clergyman or layman in the Detroit area could or would lead him to the site. Upset by this lack of recognition afforded the founder of the oldest Polish parish in America, the Texas Poles immediately took steps to transfer his remains to Panna Maria, Texas, in order to give him a final resting place “among his relatives and friends.” They received all the necessary permissions and on October 13, 1974, in a concelebrated field Mass including over a dozen priests, two of them from Father Moczygemba’s home region in Poland, and including the Archbishop of San Antonio, Father Leopold Moczygemba’s remains were reinterred in the churchyard at Panna Maria. The reburial took place beneath the same oak tree under which he had offered the first Mass with the newly-arrived Polish immigrants on Christmas Eve in 1854. Two years later an imposing granite gravestone bearing a life-size bronze bust of Father Moczygemba was placed over the grave, which is visited by hundreds of people annually. The marker bears in Polish a quotation from Fr. Leopold: “As a Silesian, I have more Polish feelings than I can express.” He was honored with the title “Patriarch of American Polonia.”

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Welcome to the forum Jasia, feel free to use any of the maps or aerials I posted, or if you use the WSU photos, cite their source (for educational purposes only).


quote:

In January 1891, he was unable to continue his priestly duties at Hilliards, so he returned to Dearborn where he spent the next few weeks growing weaker and more ill. He died on February 23, 1891 at the age of 65 years. He was quietly buried in the priest’s lot at Mount Elliott Cemetery in Detroit and mourned throughout the Polish American community. In his will be gave the remainder of his estate to the Diocese of Detroit for the support of the seminary.




I think this might be a photo of his funeral. It's an old DetNews pic in the WSU/VMC, only labeled "Polish Funeral". Looks like the vantage point was on top of a beer wagon, and the clothes look correct for that date.


Polish Funeral Detroit 1890s
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Hornwrecker
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This is the earliest that I can find on St Albertus and the Felician Sisters convent/home, from 1884 Sanborn map. The school was located on the other side of Fremont (anyone know when Fremont was changed to Canfield, and why?)


St Albertus/Felician Sisters 1884


The Felician Academy, 1921 Sanborn map. Surrounded by 11' walls!


Felician Academy 1921


1961 aerial photograph of Felician Academy.


Felician Academy 1961 aerial


A not so good jpeg of the Felician Academy from the 1910 church guide linked previously.


Felician Academy 1910

A scan of a 1933 Polish grammar book by the Felician Sisters.

Felician Sisters Polish Grammar 1933

I've added the Polonia Baking Co to the research list; will get to it when I eventually get to the Westside. It might be awhile.
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Ordinary
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Jasia,
I went out on a secret mission today and took a picture of a building on 30th and Herbert. I couldn't see an address but the house across the street was 5301 30th, so the building had to be the one. I've never posted any pictures on this forum so I'm going to try it later. Quite a few windows were smashed out and it was kind of neglected but it looked pretty solid.

Ordinary
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Livedog2
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Here is a current Google Sanborn map of 5130 30th in Detroit with a red X marking the spot. It doesn't look like there is anything on the lot anymore.

map

Livedog2
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Detroitej72
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St. Albertus

The Mother of Polish Parishes, St. Albertus.

(Message edited by detroitej72 on September 12, 2006)
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Detroitej72
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Detroitej72
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Chene Street

Old Bakery on Chene Street.

(Message edited by detroitej72 on September 12, 2006)
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Detroitej72
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Detroitej72
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Hardware Store on McDougal.

(Message edited by detroitej72 on September 12, 2006)
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Detroitej72
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Chene Street
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Detroitej72
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Detroitej72
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This sign says it all...

(Message edited by detroitej72 on September 12, 2006)
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Detroitej72
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GM's Poletown Plant
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Detroitej72
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St. Florian's Overlooking Hamtown.
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Detroitej72
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Homes on McDougall Street still well maintained.

(Message edited by detroitej72 on September 12, 2006)
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Detroitej72
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Old Business on St. Auban Street.
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Detroitej72
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I was finally able to upload my pics from my Labor Day Weekend tour of Old Poletown. Enjoy.

Detroitej72...Eastside Pole...
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Livedog2
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Posted on Tuesday, September 12, 2006 - 9:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for posting the great photos, Detroitej72!

Livedog2
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Ordinary
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Jasia,
Hell now I don't remember if the address on the house across the street was 5301 30th, or 5100 30th. Well anyway take a look. I'm directionally challenged so I can't tell you what corner, i.e. NW, SW. Driving down 30th from Michigan to I-94, the building was on the right side and on the I-94 side of Herbert.




Corner of 30th and Herbert
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Tuesday, September 12, 2006 - 10:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

On the map of the Felician Academy that I posted earlier, I missed identifying the Kulwicki, Jos., Funeral Home, est. 1878, 4190 St. Aubin & Willis, Detroit's oldest Polish Funeral Home. It would be immediately south, on the corner of Willis.

On the other side of the street was the Lemke Department Store, est 1893 to 1950, 4197 St. Aubin & Willis, on the block south of St. Albertus.


Lemke Dept Store 1921


Thanks to those posting current photos; it would be helpful to me that when posting them, to identify them with an address and/or nearest cross street, so that I might possibly find them in the fire insurance maps. Thanks.
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Livedog2
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St. Casmimir was the second oldest Polish parish in Detroit and the first on the city's west side. Founded in 1882 on 23rd and Myrtle north of Michigan Avenue, St. Casimir eventually became the springboard for the establishment of several newer Polish churches in the vicinity. This first permanent church of a Romanesque basilica design, shown below, was dedicated in 1889.
cas
This is the original cornerstone for the St. Casimir's parish church building. It is part of what was the new St. Casimir parish building that is now called the Clinton Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church.
cas6
This is the subsequent cornerstone of what was the new St. Casimir parish that became the Clinton Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church.
cas 7
This was the new St. Caimir parish that became and is the Clinton Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church today.
cas 8
The old St. Casimir parish was located on 23rd and Myrtle which is now called 23rd and M.L.King Jr.
cas 9

Livedog2
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Mashugruskie
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I'm new here, so hello! I saw this subject and was so excited to read it that I had to post a photo. This is my mother-in-law's cousin, Charles Wentura, son of Margaret Bolda and Charles Wentura. Charlie was born in Delray and was a printer. I know this is downtown Detroit but cannot say where.

I also wanted to comment about Kulwicki Funeral Home. Joseph Kulwicki's daughter, I believe, is still living and is on the preservation board for St. Albertus. She also still has every single funeral record for her father's business (but is not up to looking for information). A lot of those who were from Delray were buried from Ferguson's which was a few blocks from Woodmere. The funeral home is still there but in speaking with one of the secretaries there, they are not the original owners and do not have any of the original funeral records any longer (which, I thought by law, they had to have or give to the State or an archive?).

My family lived on St. Joseph. My maternal great great grandfather, Jan Kreft, carved the altars in St. Albertus, Sweetest Heart of Mary, and St. Hyacinth. In 1915, he slipped on the steps of St. Hyacinth and died later that day from his injuries. He is buried in Mt. Olivet.

Charlie
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Livedog2
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 8:41 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Welcome to the Forum and thank you for the great stories and wealth of information, Mashugruskie!

Livedog2
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Mashugruskie
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This is Charles Wentura's mother-in-law, Mary Rose Kruliski Bolda on the day she became a US Citizen. She was from Humenne, Pepin, Czechoslovakia. I imagine this was taken somewhere downtown. She resided on South St. in Delray. She is in the second row (from the bottom), 5th from the left. I hope this isn't too boring for everyone.

Bolda Americana
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Jasia
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 8:49 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you Ordinary, for posting the photo of the bakery! It sure looks different from the photograph I've seen in old newspapers. But I'm sure it's the same building. I can recognize it even though it's only half of what it used to be. The empty lot to the right of the building used to be the walk-in/counter sales area of the bakery. The part of the building still standing was the production area where the ovens were. It's sad to see that so many of the old buildings in Detroit are just skeletons of the vibrant communities they once were.
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Mashugruskie
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Thank you, Livedog2. I just wish there was a Poletown forum because my family lived there from 1885 and were imbedded in the town history (including the Kolasinski Affair!)

These are my maternal great grandparents, Anthony Kreft and Pelagia Malinowska with their son, Fr. Henry Kreft and their grandson, Anthony Kreft. This was taken on Springwells St. The house still stands and is immaculate. My family continuously bugs the owners every few years for a tour and they're very kind and offer it. They moved from Poletown to this area, just off Michigan Ave. because great gramps was a local manager of a grocery store and also owned buildings on Michigan Ave. Great gram later in life, used great gramp's 2,000 lb. safe that was in their library as a storage for Campbell's Pork & Beans. Fr. Kreft is still living. Kreft Hall in Auburn Hills is named for him.

Great gramps
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Mashugruskie
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I wanted to tell everyone that your photos, maps and memories are invaluable. I thank you for making special trips. A few of the homes and old buildings in the McDougall and St. Aubin areas seem so familiar (although I am young(er)) because of my genealogy research. The streets and buildings keep repeating in my research. The maps are wonderful!
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Mashugruskie
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Wasn't Lemke Department Store part of the Lemke family that was involved in the Kolasinski Affair? I recall reading that in late 1880's one of the Lemke's was shot to death through a window. I may be confused with that but I do recall the Lemke's as being part of the St. Albertus history.
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Livedog2
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Earlier in this thread I posted photos of Dobrowski Playground on the Southwest corner of St. Aubin and Forest. Along with the playground I included photos of the Memorial Plaque for Fr. Joseph Dobrowski and his accomplishment of building the first Polish Seminary in the U.S. that was later moved to Orchard Lake where it still sits and is in operation to this very day. Here is a photo of Rev. Joseph Dobrowski.


dab

quote:

Rev. Joseph Dabrowski (also sometimes spelled Dombrowski), the sixth pastor of St. Albertus Parish, differed from Fr. Kolasinski in several respects. The first was younger in age and ordination seniority (which may partly explain Fr. Kolasinski's attitude of superiority toward him). Fr. Dabrowski came from Russian-Poland and was ordained in Rome, while Fr. Kolasinski was born in Austrian-Poland and priested in Krakow. Fr. Dabrowski arrived in America twelve years before Fr. Kolasinski, coming first to Wisconsin while the latter settled in Michigan. Fr. Dabrowski, however, followed Fr. Kolasinski as pastor of St. Albertus congregation and stayed there sixteen months to Fr. Kolasinski's forty-three.
More significant were the attitudinal differences between the two priests. Where Fr. Kolasinski was outgoing, showy and individualistic, Fr. Dabrowski was retiring, plain, and group-minded. Fr. Kolasinski welcomed newspaper reporters and talked volubly (even though he used an interpreter), presenting his case with wit and charm that won him sympathy and journalistic exposure. Fr. Dabrowski spoke with journalists reluctantly and hesitantly without the use of an interpreter, but only after he had made sure of his facts and in order to correct some erroneous report that was harmful not so much to himself as to the institution or community with which he was associated. Fr. Kolasinski was always careful about his grooming and anxious to appear the polished gentleman, while Fr. Dabrowski preferred simplicity and plainness in dress as well as in speech.
To one reporter of The Evening News in December 1885, Fr. Dabrowski appeared as a man who "lays no claim to personal attractions. He is an older man than the late pastor [This is an error on the reporter's part; Fr. Dabrowski may have looked older but he was in fact younger than Fr. Kolasinski.] , dresses ordinarily in black clothes, and on the street wears a black fur cap pulled down on the left side of his head. His Roman collar is the only mark to distinguish that he is a priest. He has a full dark-complexioned face and expressionless black eyes."
Joseph Dabrowski was born January 27,1842, in a village about forty miles from the city of Lublin in Russian-Poland, the first of five children of Joseph and Caroline (Borucka) Dabrowski. From the Lublin high school he went to the University of Warsaw, where he interrupted his studies to fight in the January Rising of 1863. Then, like other refugee partisans, he went abroad. When the Pontifical Polish College was opened in Rome in 1866, he was among the first six students admitted to the new seminary. Upon completion of his philosophical and theological studies at the Gregorian University, he was ordained in Rome August 8, 1869, as a diocesan priest for missionary work in America.
Fr. Dabrowski came to the United States in December 1869 to minister to Polish Catholics in Wisconsin's Green Bay Diocese. During eleven years as a parish priest, he built two churches, a mission chapel, a parochial school, a convent with an orphanage, and a rectory; most importantly, however, his insistence brought the first Felician Sisters from Austrian-Poland to the United States in 1874 to staff the parochial school in Polonia, Wis. From the moment of their arrival, he became the Sisters' spiritual advisor and chief guide in their expansion to various states in which Poles were settled.
In 1882 Fr. Dabrowski, agreeing with Rev. John Wollowski's proposal, helped relocate the Felician headquarters in Detroit. In August of the same year, Bishop Borgess received him as a permanent member of the priestly group in the Diocese of Detroit, where Fr. Dabrowski spent the remaining two decades of his life, working with the Felicians. Founding the Polish Seminary for priests, and temporarily serving as pastor of St. Albertus Parish.
Fr. Dabrowski began his priestly labors in Detroit as chaplain and director of the Felician Motherhouse located across the street from St. Albertus Church, and comprising a novitiate, an orphanage, an academy for girls, and a teacher-training institute. The last two were incorporated in 1882 as the "Seminary of the Felician Sisters," with the academy being the first Polish high school established in Detroit.
To this "first American school for daughters of the Polish immigrants," Fr. Dabrowski, at the insistance and with the assistance of Rev. Leopold Moczygemba, a Conventual Franciscan, added the first American secondary school for sons of Polish immigrants, built with the approval of Bishop Borgess between March 1884 and December 1886. The school, popularly known as the Polish Seminary, was located on St. Aubin Avenue one block north of the Felician "Motherhouse and St. Albertus Church. During the cornerstone blessing of the new seminary on Wednesday July 22, 1885 - eighteen days after the impressive dedication of Fr. Kolasinski's magnificent new St. Albertus Church Fr. Dabrowski said in an interview to a reporter: " . . Heretofore, we have been obliged to procure Polish priests from Europe, but they cannot speak English and cannot do what a native American might. . ." And he concluded his remarks with these pointed words: "I deem the erection of this seminary more necessary than the building of expensive churches."
Without realizing it at the time, Fr. Dabrowski was referring to a church which would unexpectedly be committed to his pastoral charge four months later. On November 30, 1885, Bishop Borgess, after having earlier suspended Fr. Kolasinski, appointed Fr. Dabrowski temporary pastor of St. Albertus Church, partly because the nagging depression of 1884 had slowed down the construction of the new seminary and partly because the chancery's
confrontation with Fr. Kolasinski had reached an impasse. Fr. Dabrowski was also given a temporary assistant in Rev. Anthony Jaworski CSSP, and told to assume his post the same day (Monday).
Fr. Dabrowski's temporary pastoral tenure at St. Albertus Parish lasted nearly sixteen months - perhaps the most troubled in the congregation's history - ending March 19, 1887, when Rev. Vincent Bronikowski succeeded him. During this time, Fr. Dabrowski personally encountered two riotous disturbances in the church which incurred the interdiction or closing of the church for all but the first five days of his pastorate, so that Fr. Dabrowski as pastor was able to offer Mass only once in the new St. Albertus Church. And for nearly the last eight months of his pastorate, an unspecified number of members of the St. Albertus congregation was "excommunicated from the pale of the Holy Roman Catholic Church." In addition, from early May to early September 1886, Fr. Dabrowski was absent from the troubled and torn parish on a trip to Europe in search of Polish priests for the Diocese and for the Seminary.
The first four months of Fr. Dabrowski's pastorate, which coincided with the first, explosive, phase of the Kolasinski Crisis, were the most difficult for the forty-four year old priest. His suspended predecessor challenged the authority of Bishop Borgess and refused to vacate the parsonage. Claiming that the charges against him were false and slanderous as well as a vindictive tissue of lies concocted by his enemies, and protesting that he had been tried summarily without due process and dismissed un canonically , Fr. Kolasinski hired lawyer John B. Corliss, first to plead his case before the bishop and then to defend him in a civil suit started by the parish trustees to secure his eviction from the premises of St. Albertus rectory.
In the meantime, on Tuesday December 1, 1885, when Frs. Dabrowski and Jaworski attempted to celebrate the six and seven o'clock morning Masses in St. Albertus Church, they were prevented from performing the ceremonies by a group of men and women who hooted and hustled them out of the church and then locked its doors. About three hours later, a twenty-minute hand-fight broke out when the police charged forward to disperse the crowd of men and women standing in front of the church. There was no bloodshed, but five persons were arrested for disturbing the peace. This was the first "Polish Riot" reported by the Detroit newspapers.
Next day, Wednesday December 2, Frs. Dabrowski and Jaworski, assisted by six patrolmen, again tried to celebrate morning Mass in St. Albertus Church. In spite of initial attempts by some men and women to prevent the priests' entrance and subsequent occasional interruptions during the Masses, both priests succeeded in offering the Eucharistic Sacrifice. Fr. Jaworski was the first celebrant at six-thirty.
At seven-thirty, Fr. Dabrowski began the second Mass. He was greeted "with a terrific yell" from people who filled the front part of the church and "gave full vent to their feelings. Several rushes were made by the excited crowd to get up to the altar, but this was prevented by policemen who had been stationed at the ends of the aisles. A number then jumped over the seats, and soon an excited crowd was leaning over the communion rail, yelling and brandishing fists."
At eight o'clock the Mass was over (the only Mass celebrated by Fr. Dabrowski in St. Albertus Church as pastor). The two priests were escorted through the church and across St. Aubin Avenue by a cordon of about thirty policemen. During the procession, the marchers (including the priests) were
pelted with mud. Outside the church, after the priests had reached the safety of the Felician Motherhouse, another confrontation occured between the police and the assembled men and women, as the blue-coats enforced the order to disperse the crowd in front of the church. Again there was no bloodshed, but five women and three men were arrested for disturbing the peace. This was the second "Polish Riot" featured by the local press.
After this, Fr. Dabrowski made no more attempts to celebrate Mass in St. Albertus Church. On Friday December 4,1885, Bishop Borgess issued an official decree of interdiction read in all the Catholic Churches of the city, closing St. Albertus Church to all religious functions on account of the scandalous conduct of the congregation in disturbing religious services in the church and nearly precipitating bloodshed in front of the edifice. Though not stipulating any specific interval, the interdict was actually to remain in effect for about nineteen months - for the remainder of Fr. Dabrowski's pastorate and even beyond it, not so much because the bishop would not revoke the interdict but because the Kolasinskiites refused to open the church for use by duly appointed successors of Fr. Kolasinski.
The interdict cut like a sword through St. Albertus congregation, separating the supporters of the suspended Fr. Kolasinski from the rest of the parishioners, particularly the followers of Fr. Dabrowski. Conflicting reports as to the number of people in the respective factions were circulated. Fr. Kolasinski claimed that the majority of the parishioners adhered to him. Fr. Dabrowski could offer no estimate, since he had not had any opportunity to present his case to the congregation; he simply had to rely on the good will of the people to accept him as their pastor and to come to him for religious ministration.
But whatever were the numbers of the embattled factions, the episcopal interdict imposed a severe ecclesiastical penalty and hardship (as well as public dishonor) upon the entire St. Albertus Congregation - the rebellious and the peaceful, the disobedient and the docile - by indiscriminately closing the magnificent new church to all, because of the desecration that had occurred within its walls. More importantly, however, the interdict left unresolved a question that has intrigued historians of Polish American Catholicism, and of St. Albertus Parish in particular: Why was a priest of Fr. Dabrowski's character and accomplishments so bitterly resented and rejected by so many members of St. Albertus congregation at the outset of his pastorate?
The earlier discussion of the Kolasinski Crisis suggested several summary answers. But the present query calls for a closer scrutiny, especially since Polish Catholics then (as now) were known for their devotion to and respect for the clergy. Priests and bishops, friars and monks, had advanced not only the religious and social but also the cultural, scholarly and even political development of the nation. There was hardly an area of Polish achievement which did not include a priestly name. Fr. Dabrowski was becoming such a priestly religio-culture builder in Detroit, destined in time to be the only priest whose biography appears both in the Dictionary of American Biography and its Polish equivalent Polski Slownik Biograficzny. And yet, he, not Fr. Kolasinski, who represented a different type of Polish priest, fell prey to the tragic events that rent and (but for Fr. Dabrowski) almost wrecked St. Albertus Parish.




Credits for the photo and description above: "St. Albertus 1872 - 1973 Centennial: Detroit's Oldest Polish Parish" History by Rev. Joseph Swastek and Polish Heritage by Rev. John Szopinski, S.J.

Livedog2 humbled by all this Polish History
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Margarite
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 12:07 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mashugruskie, Was one of your relatives named Agnes Bolda. I seem to remember when I was young my mother talking to and about Aggie Boldi. I remember her as being very short and very old. I think I may have her picture in an old album.

Also, you are correct about Jean Kulwicki. She is alive and on the board of the group fighting to preserve St. Albertus. I just saw her at the picnic at the church in July.
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Mashugruskie
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 12:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Margarite,

There were two sets of Bolda families in Detroit. The Delray Bolda's were from Hungary and then there was the Poletown Bolda's who were German. I was in contact with the German Bolda's but when I found that there was no connection, we lost contact. I do know that they have a huge family who have researched their line extensively. I'm hoping that this part of the forum will continue. Maybe one of the elders here who grew up in Poletown will possibly remember some family names.
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 9:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Across the street from the Zynda Brewery was the Melin & Gutowski Furniture Company, 1531 Canfield, from around the 1890s-1920s. There is a furniture warehouse on the alley/St Ignace Place that must have been part of it.

Melin & Gutowski Furniture Co 1921

Just west of it at 1527 Canfield, was the Canfield/Lockwood/Lira Theatre that existed from 1908-24?, as best as I can determine, with not much confidence.

(Message edited by Hornwrecker on September 13, 2006)
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Livedog2
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 10:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The beloved Rev. Joseph Dabrowski, the founder of the Polish Seminary located at St. Aubin and Forest that later moved to Orchard Lake, is buried at Mount Elliott Cemetery on Mt. Elliott in Detroit. Here are some photos of his tomb. The security guards were giving me a hard time about taking photos in the cemetery without a cemetery permit. But, as you can see I didn’t let that stand in the way of my appointed task.
dab
Fr. Dabrowski's grave is located just about 25 feet inside the main gate on the left side of the main road.
dab 2
There is a beautiful grave cover tombstone describing the fact that Rev. Dabrowski was the founder of the Polish Seminary and the Chaplain of the Felician Motherhouse.
dab 3
There is a beautiful copper relief bust of Fr. Dabrowski on the head of the grave cover tombstone.
dab 4
Situated at the right hand of Fr. Dabrowski's grave is the tombstone and grave marker for Fr. Witold Buchaczkowski that was the 2nd graduate of the Polish Seminary that Fr. Dabrowski founded.
dab 5
Above Rev. Dabrowski's grave is a beautiful stone crucifix sitting on what appears to be a mound of stones.
dab 6
On the base of the crucifix is a chalice representing the Body and Blood of Christ, along with a representation of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
dab 7
Finally, the reason I didn't get a full shot of the entire grave was because I was shooting these photos surreptitiously while I was talking to the security guard and didn't know what I had shot until I got home to look at my images. I'll try to get back and get a full frame image of Rev. Joseph Dabrowski's grave to post here.
dab 8

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 10:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey Hornwrecker how are my pictures looking since I took your advice? :-)

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 10:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I woder what you deleted, D2dyeah!? Whenever a name shows up as the last poster and you get there and they are not the last poster it makes you wonder!

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 10:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

They're looking good! (and I can finally put away my magnifying glass)

Looks like we have a new poster who placed their post on page 2.

Another important fixture in the Eastside Polish community was the Chene-Ferry Farmer's Market, located at 2263 E. Ferry, just west of Chene.

It doesn't show up on the 1921 Sanborn map, and it was in operation until sometime in the 1970s. It is still standing, yellow brick L-shaped building with reddish trim.

A couple of photos from WSU/VMC:


Chene-Ferry Mkt

Chene-Ferry Mkt

Part of the yearly ritual was to take one of my grandmothers down there each year to buy bushels of cucumbers for pickling.

Searching around the web, it looks like the only thing going on there is, it is being used as a recycling drop-off.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 11:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hornwrecker, you are quick on the uptake. I knew somebody posted something but when I didn't see their name when I went to the current postings I knew something was up. It never occurred to me that someone would have or even could have posted something on an earlier page.

The list is getting longer and more detailed. You're going to have to update your spreadsheet of places and if you do send me a copy. If you want me to do it just say so and I'll do it and send you a copy, Hornwrecker.

I had forgotten all about the annual treks to the Chene-Ferry Farmer's Market with my babsia for pickles for canning. I use to help with the process by first cleaning the double cement wash sinks in the basement. Then I would fill up the sinks with cold water on both side. First, I would scrub the pickles in the first tub and then rinse them in the second tub. I would get all the herbs and spices along with the dill and stuff it in each of the jars that we had just sterilized and cleaned. You get the idea because you probably did it, too! What great memories!!

dill

Livedog2 just loving this thread...
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Livedog2
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Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 11:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is a current Google Sanborn map of the Chene-Ferry Farmer's Market at 2263 E. Ferry St. at Chene.

chene

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 1:01 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

These are old photos of St. Albertus Polish Roman Catholic Church at St. Aubin and Canfield in Detroit. These photos have a taller and more pointed spire than the one that exists today. The spire of today only comes up to the point where I placed the red arrow in the 1st photo. I believe their was some inclimate weather that caused steeple damage and it was not rebuilt to its old height
adal 5
This is a current photo of the St. Albertus Church spire as it exists today so you can see as a comparison to the old photo above. Look at the placement of the clocks in the old and new photos.
adal9
These photos came from the WSU archives and were mislabeled as St. Adalbertus Catholic Church when in fact we know them to be St. Albertus Catholic Church.
adal 2
This is a current Google Sanborn map of the St. Albertus Polish Roman Catholic Church located on the SW corner of St. Aubin and Canfield.
st. adal

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:46 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is the evidence for the earlier claim of

quote:

These are old photos of St. Albertus Polish Roman Catholic Church at St. Aubin and Canfield in Detroit. These photos have a taller and more pointed spire than the one that exists today. The spire of today only comes up to the point where I placed the red arrow in the 1st photo. I believe there was some inclement weather that caused steeple damage and it was not rebuilt to its old height.




“While the new school (along with his American-mindedness) might have been Fr. Herr's most lasting influence on St. Albertus Parish, he did not neglect the church edifice and its functions. He watched over the building and kept it in excellent condition. Shortly after becoming pastor, he repaired the roof and shortened the steeple which had been damaged by a windstorm just before Fr. Mueller's death.”

ste

Credits for the photo and description above: "St. Albertus 1872 - 1973 Centennial: Detroit's Oldest Polish Parish" History by Rev. Joseph Swastek and Polish Heritage by Rev. John Szopinski, S.J. p. 131

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:51 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dog, isn't that third photo SHoM?

I might as well repost the 1921 Sanborn map for Sweetest Heart of Mary, corner of Russell and Canfield in this thread, just for completeness. Anton Dlugi house in red.

Sweetest Heart of Mary 1921

A couple of photos from WSU/VMC that were properly identified, giving a feel for the area. I like the Goebel truck in the second one.

Sweetest Heart of Mary

Sweetest Heart of Mary
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Livedog2
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 12:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hornwrecker, those are both great shots of Sweetest Heart of Mary. Now it makes sense in my earlier post of "Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 2:01 am:" I stated that,

quote:

These photos came from the WSU archives and were mislabeled as St. Adalbertus Catholic Church when in fact we know them to be St. Albertus Catholic Church.


Well, I was right that WSU mislabeled it as St. Adalbertus Catholic Church but then I compouded the error by saying,

quote:

when in fact we know them to be St. Albertus Catholic Church.


When in fact this is the Sweetest Heart of Mary Catholic Church. And, here, I've reposted it for clarity of reference.

Hornwrecker, getting back to the first photo you posted in your last post showing the Sweetest Heart of Mary parish and the whole neighborhood surrounding it on Canfield. I long for those days of hustle and bustle in those old Polish neighborhood but now all we have are remembrances, ghosts and people like use that are keeping it alive!

mary

Livedog2
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Detroitej72
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 8:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I used to go to Chene-Ferry Market as a wee youngster. I remember my mother showing me where her and my grandma used to buy live ducks and chickens when she was a girl. It wasn't until much later she told me how the duck soup was made!

When I was about 4 years old, my parents bought me a pet rabbit from a couple of Polish girls. Even at such a young age, I remember thinking they were very pretty.

After our journy in the market, we would always stop at the Palmer Bakery on the corner of Chene and Palmer. My mom insisted on stoppping because she always went there as a child.

Even in the late 70's the neighborhood still had a very Polish influence.

Detroitej72...Polish Eastsider
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Livedog2
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 8:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Great stories, Detroitej72!

Livedog2chicken
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 9:06 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You're thinking about czernina, good stuff, if made properly, although I don't like the prunes that they make it with sometimes.

I remember making the rounds of most of the Polish bakeries in the city with my grandfather. For awhile he had the Warsawa Bakery on Jos. Campau in Hamtramack, but went back to Silvercup to run the night shift there. I can't remember all of the bakeries that we visited, but he was friends with probably most of them. I remember that some of them still had coal fired brick ovens, and people used to bring in suckling pigs for roasting for some special occasion.

Today I made about a gallon of dill pickles (refrigerator type), and just sampled one; damn, it tastes like I remember they should. There's a small fruit/veg stand on 10 Mile near Ryan where I bought freshly picked cukes, and fresh dill. The grower wasn't happy with how the dill looked, so he gave me two extra bunches. Total cost for dill and 3 lbs of pickle cukes: $2.80.
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Detroitej72
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 9:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thats cruel Livedog!

Horn, when I was a kid, I thought the reason that czernina was red because of the prunes!!!
As you can guess, my parents didn't tell me I was wrong until I was older.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In the late 1940's we lived with my grandma and grandpa on Dearing between Jos. Campau and Mitchell. I use to go around the corner to the poultry market on E. Davison Ave. between McDougall and Mitchell with my grandpa or my mother from time-to-time. It was run by a Jewish man and wife like so many of the retail establishments were back in those days. The name of the place was Berman’s Poultry Market and it was always fun to go there because you got to see your food live. And, it was like going to the zoo and it didn’t cost anything but it wasn’t as exotic as the zoo.

These merchants were good people that would allow you to purchase their goods "on the book" which was on credit. They had a master book of all their customers and each customer had their own little book. When you made a purchase "on the book" they would record the amount in your book and in their book. Then when payday came which was usually on Fridays you would go down to the store and pay the merchant in cash for the amount due. They never charged interest and if you were short money they would carry you for a rerasonable time.

Anyway, when you went there to get your live poultry there was lots of noise from the chickens, roosters, ducks, pigeons, and what-have-you that they sold there. It was also foul smelling, no pun intended. So, you would go to all the cages to figure out what you wanted and the people buying always seemed to know how to pick just the right chicken or duck or whatever. They would look at and inspect the birds closely; the merchant would take them out of the cage if you wanted them to and the customer would look at them closely and feel them all around. It was a very impressive process.

Once you figure out what bird you wanted it was a matter of what you wanted to do with them. Some people brought their own cages in which to carry their foul home in. If you didn’t do that the merchant would tie off their wings and legs so they couldn't get away, I guess. Then they would wrap them in newspaper and tie them up with twine and you could carry them home under your arm. That was what people did that wanted to slaughter their own birds and it was cheaper if you took them live so you could kill them yourself when you got home.

My grandparents preferred to slaughter their own poultry for many reason not the least of which was it was cheaper. But, there were other reason like culture and tradition that they did it themselves. My mother on the other hand couldn’t bring herself to do it herself. In that case after you selected your bird at the poultry shop the merchant had identical brass discs with the same number on them. They would tie one of them around the leg of your bird and give you the other which was your claim check. At the specified time you would come back and pick-up your cleaned and dressed-out bird ready for the pot.

Now, my grandma provided a real adventure with her birds because of course it would be alive and it might stay alive for a few days staked out in the yard. It was always interesting to see these birds scratch and peck around the yard for food and of course I wanted to touch them but everyone said, “Stay away from that dirty bird!” But, I didn’t. Finally, the day of reckoning would come for the bird and my grandma would grab the bird in one hand and the hatchet in the other and she would chop the birds head off on the edge of a piece of kindling wood that was sitting upright just for that purpose.

One time my grandma did it in the basement when I was real little. It was a chicken and she chopped its head off and got away and ran around the basement squirting blood out of its neck until it just expired. I was horrified and had nightmares about that for many nights but I got over it. That’s the way it was with adversity – you just got over it. And, nothing went to waste in those days. My mother and grandma made the best chicken soup of all out of the chicken feet. Now, a day you can’t even find chicken feet unless you go to an Asian Poultry Market where you can still buy live poultry and get the feet. The best chicken soup you ever ate!
CHICKEN

A capon is a rooster (a male chicken) whose testicles were removed at a young age. Typically the castration is performed when the chicken is between 6 and 20 weeks old. We use to get these quite often when I was a kid because the benefits are a non-aggressive male that can serve as a mother for baby chicks. They also produce ample, tender meat when butchered and as such are a choice poultry meat for the thrifty Polish residents.
CAPON

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:35 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Singer Poultry Co. at 2801-11 Russell at Alfred St. provided live and dressed birds as well as eggs to the "old" Polish neighborhood.
poul

Livedog2
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Detroitej72
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Livedog, Its funny you had a story about a headless chicken running around, as I did too.

Seems my grandpa chopped off a chickens head in the basement on winter, and the headless chicken ran around for almost a half hour before it "expired".

I guess it probably wasn't all that uncommon back in those days for this to happen.

Still, it used to creap the bejibers out of me as a wee little lad!

Detroitej72
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Detroitej72
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:40 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

BTW, I agree the feet make wonderful Rosol Soup.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:49 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Rosol Soup?!

I thought it was called chicken soup.

soup

Livedog2
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Detroitej72
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Posted on Thursday, September 14, 2006 - 11:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mmmm, looks tastey!

My mom's maden name was Rosol, and whenever we eat at Under The Eagle in Hamtown, the menu in Polish says Rosol for Chicken soup.

She says that is why she loves chicken soup!

However, if your bad, NO SOUP FOR YOU!!!!!!!!!!

Detroitej72
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Livedog2
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 12:16 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Very good for soups.
rest
Very authentic and very inexpensive.
rest2
Good food but the waitresses are all young girls that are talking to each other all the time and it is hard to get service.
rest3
Maybe the best of the bunch and surly the oldest of the group. I like the ambiance.
rest4

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 12:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Speaking of which it is lunch time and what could be better than Pierogi, peas, carrots, potatoes and corn.
food
All washed down with Poland Spring Water!
water

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 9:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You get a couple of Poles together, and they immediately start talking about food, and who's mother made the best pierogies.


Time for the Dom Polski (East), 2287 E Forest near Chene, est 1913, from the 1921 Sanborn Fire Insurance maps.


Dom Polski (East) 1921

This photo from WSU/VMC is labeled as Dom Polski, the stage arrangement looks correct and it was taken from a balcony. To confirm, someone would have to check to see if the side window arrangement agrees with the photo.

Dom Polski (East)

This is the crest on the top facade of the building, from WSU/WPR Library.

Dom Polski (East)
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Livedog2
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 11:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here are two different views of the intersection of St. Aubin and Canfield -- one is from May 18, 1935 and the other is September 15, 2006, 71 years later.

This one is from the WSU Archives with the landmark of St. Albertus Parish in the bottom right hand corner of the map right at St. Aubin and Canfield.
can

This one is from a recent Google Sanborn map from today, September 15, 2006 and again St. Albertus Parish is in the bottom right hand corner of the map at St. Aubin and Canfield.
can2

Livedog2
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Detroitej72
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 11:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Livedog, that is a very depressing shot. Way to bring me down on a Friday night!
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Livedog2
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 11:45 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is pretty damn depressing to see what a vital and growing city it was when our people were there and now.......

Our people established and grew institutions that still contribute to the furtherance of society. We had/have a culture of building, cleaning and expanding for future generations of our own and others. I am very proud of my/our people and the contributions they made to the City of Detroit and rightfully so!

Livedog2
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Detroitej72
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 1:00 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Livedog2, I agree with your statements. Our People have and will keep contributing to Detroit for many years to come as long as folks like us keep the memories alive.

I think these thoughts each week as I drive down Canfield to church at St. Josephat's.

Long Live Poletown... From the ashes we shall rise!!!!!!!!!!!
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 10:02 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I appreciate your enthusiasm, Detroitej72 but I think our people’s day has passed. We’ll never come back to the glory we were, at least in our lifetime, if ever, because we have become so assimilated that we don’t really even know who we were/are anymore unless we read about it in a book or on the internet. Most of the old timers are gone and now we’ve got… Well, you know what I mean!

It might be time for the immigration process to start moving back the other way!

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 11:04 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

One of the large early employers of many Polish immigrants was the Dodge Main Plant on the south end of Hamtramck and the north end of the old Poletown Area. My own grandfather worked there from 1917 until his death in 1953. Many people took the Chene Streetcar and later the bus to the plant off of Jos Campau.

Here's a 1920's aerial view of the Dodge Main Plant in Hamtramck in the left center of the photo thanks to WSU/VMC.
dodge

Livedog2
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Iowaboy
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 11:31 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The Hupp plant is also visible in photo showing Dodge Main. It's those four multi-story buildings about 2 or 3 blocks to the right of Dodge Main. I like this photo Livedog2.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 11:44 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Glad you like it, Iowaboy! There's also the Murray Corp. in the foreground, too. It is a great shot from so long ago back in the 1920's!!

Livedog2
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Iowaboy
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 11:48 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As I understand the GM assembly plant, just about everything you see in the forground of this picture all the way back to and including Dodge Main and Hupp was demolished. Except for maybe that little parcel in the lower left. Does that sound right?
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 12:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That sounds right to me Iowaboy. But, I'm sure there is someone reading this that can provide an aerial of the cuurent location of the GM Assembly Plant along with all of its grounds.

It would be interesting to have a map of the current location with an overlay map of the way it was back in the say 1920's or even beyond.

I did some work on a consulting basis at the old Dodge Main Plant and you just wouldn't believe that complex and the way it was built and added onto over the years.

Talking about and seeing photos of the old Dodge Main Plant is one thing but actally seeing it is another thing! You can't adequately decribe or photograph it!!

Livedog2
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Iowaboy
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 12:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When you look at photos of the old Hupp plant all by itself, it was not what I would call a small plant. However, Hupp is tiny when you compare it to Dodge Main. Great Photo!!
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 12:20 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You know Iowaboy I would love to see aerial views, photos and Sanborn maps of the old American Car & Foundry, AC&F, complex on Russell St. south of where Interstate-94 or Ford Freeway is now located. It was one of the largest manufacturing complexes and largest employers of the pioneer Poles in Detroit.

I think I'll get busy on that part of this project.

Thank God Hornwrecker has an interest in this topic because his contributions are priceless to the history of the Detroit Polish Community.

Livedog2
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Hamtramck_steve
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 4:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Iowaboy, you're just about spot on about the demolition. To help orient yourself, the left edge of Livedog's aerial photo shows where the train viaduct crosses Campau, which is still there.
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Mike_m
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 6:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's a comparison of 1961 and 1981:

Poletown 1961
Poletown 1981

I outlined in green the general area that was demolished, and in red the Dodge Main and Huppmobile plants. Boundaries may be off a bit, but you get the idea.
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Iowaboy
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 6:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That is just amazing. It is really a sad, sad, sad piece of history!!!
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 7:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is the official portrait of St. Albertus Polish Roman Catholic Church, inside and outside, on the 118th year anniversary of the inception of the parish and the year of the closing of the parish by the archdiocese.

church

It is arguably the most beautiful of the Polish Roman Catholic Churches in Detroit and maybe the most beautiful of all the Roman Catholic Churches in Detroit. At least that is my opinion! It is in great disrepair today and needs lots of money to repair and renovate the mother of all Polish Roman Catholic Churches in Detroit.

There are a number of young men that are living in the rectory at the behest of the The Polish American Historic Site Association (PAHSA) (a member of the Polish American Congress) that have taken charge of St. Albertus Roman Catholic Church. These young men are doing repairs and restorations of the church and other buildings in the complex in exchange for free rent.

I would encourage all of you that love the history, traditions and culture that comes from this venerable institution to do what you can do financially and otherwise to help restore this piece of our collective history.

Livedog2

(Message edited by livedog2 on September 16, 2006)
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 8:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's another more beautiful shot of the front altar of St. Albertus Polish Roman Catholic Church.
chu

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 8:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for doing the aerials, Mikem. (crosses that off of the to do list)

Time to post the 1921 Sanborn map of St. Josaphat's, 705 E Canfield and Hastings.

St Josaphat 1921

On the block west of the church, on the corner of 510 Garfield and Beaubien, was located the 1st Hungarian Hebrew Congregation Church.

One block north of the church was located a large cigar factory, the Consolidated Cigar Co, Lilies Cigar Brahch, 714 E Forest and Hastings.
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Karenka
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 8:29 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Great information here! Don't forget that the renovation and upkeep of St. Albertus is funded by the Polish American Historic Site Association, which is always looking for new members: http://www.stalbertus.org/asso c.htm. If we want our history to survive here in Metro Detroit, it's up to us to support organizations like this, with our money and with our presence at their events.

Also, early in this thread there was a remark questioning the Polishness (and the competence) of Ceil Jensen, author of Polish Detroit. Whether or not folks are happy with her book, Ceil's family goes far back in the early history of Detroit Polonia (her maiden name is Wendt, and remember that the German-sounding names of many of Detroit's earliest Polish settlers reflect the fact that they came from the Prussian partition.) She is a nationally-recognized expert in the field of Polish genealogy.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 9:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We never liked being under the domination of the Germans, Prussians, square heads or anything else you would like to call them and we still don't like it! The Polish can do just fine chronicling their own history without the help of those that had their jackboots on our throats!!

you said,

quote:

She is a nationally-recognized expert in the field of Polish genealogy.


well she's that only if you accept that alleged fact and I don't.

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 11:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is the old Chevrolet Gear & Axle Plant in Hamtramck bounded by Poland, St. Aubin, Lumpkin and Euclid. This was one of the other large employers of Polish immigrants in the old Polish neighborhood. The 1st image is a photo from the WSU/VMC collection taken on 5/15/1936.
chev
The other image is a current Google Sanborn map of the same area as it looks today.
chev2

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 - 12:22 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

St. Josaphat Roman Catholic Church

Parish Beginnings
St. Josaphat Roman Catholic Church was founded on June 1st of 1889. It was the fourth Polish-speaking parish established in the city of Detroit. It was founded in response to irregularities and disagreements taking place in the neighboring parishes of Sweetest Heart of Mary and St. Albertus. On February 2nd, 1890, the first combination church and school building was dedicated. Within a decade plans were made for a new church, rectory and convent.

In 1907, the convent was completed. The Parish Elementary School and High School were staffed by the Felician Sisters. The Complex was listed on the National Register of Historical Places in 1982.

The Church Architecture
In 1901 this late Victorian Romanesque style church was completed by Joseph G. Kastler and William B. N. Hunter. Local carpenters, Harcus and Lang and the Jermolowicz Brothers, were the builders. The church also features some gothic and Baroque details.

St. Josaphat Church is built of a red orange brick and is trimmed in Bedford Indiana buff limestone. The stained glass was crafted by the Detroit Stained Glass Works. The church is 132 feet long and 56 feet wide. The ceilings are 65 feet high and the seating capacity is 1200. The main steeple is 200 feet tall while the side steeples are each 100 feet tall.
All of the sacred images of the church are illuminated by a myriad of tiny light bulbs. The church was originally built with both gas and electric which can be seen by observing the fixtures throughout the church At the turn of the century there was a great fascination with the electric light bulb which is clearly witnessed in St. Josaphat Church.
The Art Work
The interior of the church features five beautiful altars. The main altar is centered around a painting of the patron of the parish, St. Josaphat dressed in the vestments of an eastern rite bishop. This painting can also be raised to reveal a beautiful image of Our Lady of Czestochowa, the “Black Madonna.” On either side of the central image are figures of Ss. Stanislaus Kostka & Aloysius Gonzaga.

The side altars in the sanctuary are dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Sacred Heart of Jesus. They also feature figures of Ss. Joachim & Anne and Ss. Peter & Paul. In the transept of the church are altars dedicated to Ss. Anthony of Padua and Francis of Assisi. Figures of St. Clare and St. Theresa of Avila. are also found there.

The stained glass windows feature Mary & Joseph and the twelve apostles. The woodwork throughout the church is white oak.

Throughout the church a beautiful collection of murals can be seen on the ceiling and walls. Above the high altar the Most Holy Trinity is pictured. On the left and right of this are the Nativity and the Last Supper. The Resurrection is also portrayed. On the side walls of the sanctuary are murals of a Pilgrimage to Czestochowa and a Battle during World War I between Polish and Russian forces. The Poles were victorious due to the miraculous intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

The central transept of the church features images of the four evangelists. Over the nave of the church is a unique image of Mary the Queen of Poland surrounded by the saints of Poland. Other images to be found are Holy Family, St. Cecilia, and Christ and the children.

Above the four confessionals are murals depicting the expulsion of Adam & Eve from the garden of paradise, St. Peter’s denial of Christ, the return of the prodigal son and Mary Magdalene drying Christ’s feet with her hair.
Rev. Casimir Rochowski organized and was the first pastor of St. Josaphat Church.
From: Historic St. Josaphat Catholic Church

St. Josaphat was the third in the trinity of Polish Roman Cathoolic Churches on the east side. The other two being St. Albertus and Sweetest Heart of Mary.
jos
jos2
jos3
jos4

Livedog2
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Karenka
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Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 - 12:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Coming from the Prussian partition did not mean you were German (do I have to explain this elementary fact?!), any more than coming from the Russian partition meant you were Russian, or coming from Galicia meant you were Austrian or Hungarian. And the Kashubian names of our earliest Polish settlers in Detroit are often distinctly Germanic-sounding, as you may have noticed. Take a look at the surname lists at the Sweetest Heart website: http://sweetestheartofmary.org /surname.htm

you said,
quote:
"She is a nationally-recognized expert in the field of Polish genealogy.

well she's that only if you accept that alleged fact and I don't."

Your personally accepting or not accepting a fact doesn't make a bit of difference to its validity. See the Polish Genealogical Society of America website list of presenters at its 2006 conference (www.pgsa.org/Conference28/bios .html): "Ceil Jensen has thirty years of teaching experience in traditional and electronic art, art history and social studies. She has been a pioneer in integrating technology into the classroom. Ms. Jensen was a co-presenter with Bill Gates at the Technology and Life Long Seminar in Detroit in 1997. Ms. Jensen has documented her ancestry back to East and West Prussia, Galicia, Congress Poland and Posen and has done on-site research in Europe. She is the author of Sto Lat, the PGSA's new book on finding your Polish roots, and three books from Arcadia Press: Detroit's Polonia and two books due out in late 2006, Detroit's Mount Olivet Cemetery and Detroit's Mount Elliot Cemetery." Or take a look at her own website: http://mipolonia.net/

If you don't like her book, fine. But to question her Polishness because you don't like her book dredges up the same old intra-Polonian fights of 125 years ago.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 - 12:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Karenka, your comments about "The Early Detroit Polish Community..." are welcome. Thank you!

The roots of "The Early Detroit Polish Community..." are strong and extend back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean from the Polish Diaspora back to the homeland . These photos are of the Memorial Service and Parade for General Józef Klemens Pilsudski and took place on May 18, 1935 just six (6) days after the General's death.

Parade outside the church.
joe
Mass inside the church.
joe2
Photos: WSU/VMC

Józef Klemens Pilsudski, December 5, 1867 – May 12, 1935 was a Polish revolutionary and statesman, Field Marshal, first Chief of State (1918–1922) and dictator (1926–1935), of the Second Polish Republic, as well as the leader of its armed forces. From the middle of the First World War, until his death, Pilsudski was the major influence in the foreign policy and government of Poland, and an important figure in European politics. He is considered to be largely responsible for Poland regaining its independence, one hundred and twenty three years after the partitions of Poland.
Pilsudski was a supporter of the cause of Polish independence from his youth, and in his early political life was an influential member—and later, leader—of the Polish Socialist Party. He considered the Russian Empire to be the most formidable obstacle to Polish independence, and thus worked with Austria-Hungary and Germany to ensure its defeat in the First World War. Later, he withdrew his support from the Central Powers as it became more beneficial for the Polish cause to work with the Triple Entente. During the ensuing Polish-Soviet War, he commanded the Kiev Operation and the Battle of Warsaw. From 1918 (the year Poland regained independence) until 1921, he was the Chief of State.
Later, as the Polish government became dominated by his political opponents from endecja he withdrew from politics, but returned to power after the May 1926 coup d'état, becoming the de facto dictator of Poland. From then on, he primarily concentrated on military and foreign affairs, until his death in 1935. To this day, he is held in high regard by most of the Polish public.
From Wikipedia

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 - 8:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Welcome to the forum Karenka, hope that you can post some info/photos or fill in a few holes that we may have. Don't mind the Dog, he's mostly harmless, but likes to type before thinking of how the words will appear to others. (That's something to keep in mind, as these online Detroit history projects turn up towards the top in google searches (which is annoying to me, as I'm looking for other sources). Also, a reminder to cite your sources, and post links to the websites as this helps our search rankings.)

This thread is slated for transfer to the Hall of Fame section (where Mikem and I are moderators) and will remain open, as are all threads there, so there is no risk of letting this fall off the main page.

Now that's out of the way, here is St Stanislaus, on Medbury and Dubois, from the 1921 Sanborn maps.

St Stanislaus 1921

Dog, I'm going to do some restoration work on those 1920ish Polish parade pics at WSU.

I'm working my way through the rest of the churches, and starting in on businesses and social locations.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 - 11:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

St. Stanislaus School, School and Church.
st
St. Stanislaus School.
st2
St. Stanislaus Church.
st3
St. Stanislaus School, School and Church.
st4
St. Stanislaus Church spires.
st5

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 - 11:44 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Working on all these photos -- cleaning them up, resizing and posting them I worked up a real appetite. So, what better thing to eat while working on the “The Early Detroit Polish Community...” thread than making a meal of Kowalski Kiszka, New Palace Bakery Rye Bread (With the seeds!) and butter. Then washing it down with a Faygo Cream Soda! Now that’s real eating and living!! Should I eat that punchki or save it for tomorrow morning with my coffee. I’ll save it for my coffee in the morning.

kizka

Livedog2 in Hamtramck Heaven – is that anywhere near Hill Billy Heaven?
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 10:20 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

More St. Stanislaus
School.
stan
Ediface.
stan2
St. Stanislaus Center.
stan3
Church.
stan4
Spire.
stan5
Side of church.
stan6
Main stain glasses.
stan7
Rose window.
stan8
Rectory.
stan9
Medbury St. with St. Stanislaus on right.
stan10

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 10:53 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the Stanislaus pics, Dog. I haven't been down around there in years. I guess that style is Italianate.

Here's the map for St Hedwig (Jadwiga), 3245 Junction and Norton (St Hedwig), from the 1924 Sanborn maps.


St Hedwig 1924

There was nothing of note, in the area surrounding the church on this map.

(Message edited by Hornwrecker on September 18, 2006)
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 12:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nothing to it, Hornwrecker! Here's a little more information about St. Stanislaus I was able to find. Sorry about the quality of the shot but it's a picture of a copy of a picture. Frankly, I was surprised that there was an earlier iteration of St. Stanislaus. I have some information way back in my long term memory that kind of disputes some of the information that follows but I'll have to do some more research to find out what it was and how it squares with this information. So, here it is!

st.

St. Stanislaus Parish, Detroit Michigan 1910
The year 1898 marked the commencement of the history of St. Stanislaus' parish. Bishop Foley founded the parish and appointed Rev. F.G. Zella to its rectorship. Since its foundation the parish has built a new school that can readily accommodate one thousand pupils. Eight hundred and fifteen children are the present enrollment, and the Felician Sisters are the teachers.
Rev. F.G. Zella has been identified with the parish since its foundation. He received his early education in the Detroit College and his theological and philosophical training at St Francis' Seminary in Milwaukee. He was ordained by Bishop Foley in 1893. In his parochial work he is assisted by Rev. N.W. Zbranice.
St. Stanislaus' church is located at Dubois Street and Medbury Avenue.

Thanks to The Polish Genealogical Society of America

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 12:50 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As the first native Polish saint, Stanislaus is the patron of Poland and Kraków, and of some Polish dioceses. He shares the patronage of Poland with Saint Adalbert of Prague and Our Lady the Queen of Poland. This is the saint that St. Stanislaus on Medbury and Chene was named after in Detroit

Adalbert Vojtech of Prague had already in 977 entertained the idea of becoming a missionary in Prussia. After he had converted Hungary, he was sent by the Pope to convert the heathen Prussians. When Adelbert did not heed warnings to stay away from the sacred oak groves, Adalbert was executed for sacrilege, which his co-religionists interpreted as martydom, in April 997 on the Baltic Sea coast near Truso. It is recorded that his body was bought back to Poland for its weight in gold by Boleslaus the Brave. This is the saint that St. Albertus on St. Aubin and Canfield was named after in Detroit and at times in the old photo archives is referred to as St. Adalbert Catholic Church.

Livedog2
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Livernoisyard
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 1:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

During the 1920s and 1930s, Ste. Hedwig's school had 1200 kids in 16 classrooms (~75 kids per classroom). And teachers bitch about overcrowding today when more than 18 kids are in their classes!

Tha archdiocese fought the formation of Hedwig because the bishop said that Detroit already had a Polish parish. So it was financed and built without the help of the bishop. The older Polish community also was from the Prussian parts of Poland, whereas those from Hedwig were from the Austrian part of Poland.

My mother was born a couple blocks away from Hedwig where her parents were living temporarily after they got married with relatives at Federal and Hammond. Her slightly older cousin who lived on Hammond eventually became one of the Ste. Hedwig's black Franciscans, but he served his entire priesthood in a wealthy Connecticut parish. He returned to Detroit for his 25th Jubilee and also did the same at the Basilica on Milwaukee's Polish "Soutsite."
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 4:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

St. Hedwig (or in Polish Jadwiga) Polish Roman Catholic Church.
hed
Across the street from St. Hedwig the former Bozek Funeral Home.
hed2
The Convent.
hed3
St. Hedwig Parish 100th Anniversary banner.
hed4
St. Hedwig School.
hed5

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 4:17 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

St. Hedwig Parish.
hedg
St. Hedwig cornerstone.
hedg2
Former Pinkos-Szwapa Funeral home two doors down from St. Hedwig Church and next door to the No Name Flower Shop.
hedg3
School corner stone.
hedg4
Other school cornerstone
hedg5

Livedog2
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D2dyeah
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 4:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you Livedog for the pictures. St. Hedwigs stills looks beautiful to me. My family also spent time at Bozeks for my Grandpa's and Aunt Irenes funerals. The building still looks well maintained. Thanks again
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 4:40 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You are more than welcome, D2dyeah! My "Thank you!" is someone like you that appreciates my effort!!

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 4:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is the way of the world in 2006!
wig
The No Name Flower Shop has a name and it is St. Hedwig Flower & Gift Shop. See the house next door? That's where the Pinkos-Szwapa Funeral Home was housed.
wig2
These are the owners of the St. Hedwig Flower & Gift Shop. The woman's father built the building that houses the flower shop with his own hands and she was born upstairs!
wig3

Surprisingly, unlike the eastside Polonia there are still a fair amount of Poles living around St. Hedwig! Bless them!!

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 4:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Saint Jadwiga (1374? – July 17, 1399) was a Polish monarch who reigned from 1384 to 1399 and is venerated by the Roman Catholic Church as Saint Hedwig (Jadwiga) the Queen. She is the Patron Saint of Queens, and of United Europe. And, St. Hedwig Polish Roman Catholic Church on Junction on the westside of Detroit was named after Saint/Queen Jadwiga.

Livedog2
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D2dyeah
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 6:41 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Its incredible that St. Hedwig flower shop is still there. My mother says they provided the flowers for 3 family weddings at the church, and did flowers for the stage across the street at Dom Polskis for one of the receptions. A few doors away from the funeral home was a toy/gift and candy store that my uncle used as a supplier for his bar supply business. Thanks again for the pleasant memories Livedog.
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 7:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Glad to be able to provide the stimulus that brought up pleasant memories and important events and times in your life, D2dyeah! That's what this whole thread is about for me. It's a walk down Primrose Lane before the big event!!

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 8:22 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the great stories, Livernoisyard!

Livedog2
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Livernoisyard
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 8:29 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When it's my time, Ste. Hedwig's in Dearborn Heights will plant me near my father and relatives and my mother, when her time comes...
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Livernoisyard
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 8:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ste Hedwig's once had an excellent web site concerning its history and all. However, its history was pulled about five years ago.

If anybody really wants to see it reinstalled, he or she should bitch to the parish to put it back. But again, it caters to different clients today--Mexicans and not very many Polish, although it is situated in the most heavily Polish (and declining) area in Detroit.
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1175
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 8:37 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Let's hope that'll be a long time from now, Livernoisyard! You have a lot more posts to make on this "The Early Detroit Polish Community..." thread before then!!

Livedog2
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D2dyeah
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Username: D2dyeah

Post Number: 13
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 10:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You are absolutely right Livernoisyard. Looking at livedog2's terrific photos, has opened a floodgate of memories for me and the times I spent with my grandparents and cousins at St. hedwigs. Even with the railroad tracks cutting right thru the neighborhood, it was always well tended and clean.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 1452
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The railroaders had a special name--The Ho Chi Minn Trail--for that area due to the high theft rate there from the Polish kids assisted and abetted by the very slow speed limit at West Detroit--Junction Street caused by the infamous "10 mph bends."
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Hornwrecker
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Username: Hornwrecker

Post Number: 1616
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's another Westside Polish parish, St Francis, est 1905, Wesson & Buchanan. I don't think I've ever seen this church, unlike Hedwig's, where I used to play grade school concerts with the Hamtramack Concert Band, in olden times.

St Francis 1924

(Message edited by Hornwrecker on September 19, 2006)
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Livedog2
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Post Number: 1179
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It's taken me awhile to find this shot I took of the St. Albertus altar back in May of 2004. It is one of my favorite shots I've taken of any of the churches I've photographed and I'm pretty proud of it. And, as pretty as the image is it still doesn't do justice to the beauty of St. Albertus!

alb

Livedog2
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 1453
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What's with this--the other Westside Polish parish ("i" inserted)? There are several others in Southwest Detroit. St. Stephen's where I taught the fifth grade for a bit even has Polish on its exterior on Central. My mother was baptised there when the church only existed in the basement. Hedwig started as a basement church also.
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D2dyeah
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Username: D2dyeah

Post Number: 14
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:33 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is "Our Lady Queen of Angels", still intact?
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 1454
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Posted on Monday, September 18, 2006 - 11:51 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Until fairly recently, three parish schools--the Southwest Detroit vicariate administered by the vicar at Ste. Anne's--were all what was left of the Archdiocese's schools in SW Detroit's once twelve parish schools. They were K-5s Cunegunda and Stephen and 6-8 Our Lady. Now all closed.

I think that the older convent at Our Lady's was demoed or burned. Or so I heard. I haven't been down on Martin Street for a few months.
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1180
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 2:03 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

St Francis D'Assisi Polish Roman Catholic Church Complex.

Front of the Gymnasium and Auditorium Building.
FRan
Full view of the depth of the Gymnasium and Auditorium Building.
fran2
St. Francis D'Assisi Parish Center Buchanan St. side.
fran3
St. Francis D'Assisi Parish Center Buchanan St. side.
fran4
St. Francis D'Assisi Parish Center Wesson St. side.
fran5
St. Francis D'Assisi Parish Center full view including the Buchanan and Wesson Sts. sides.
fran6

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1182
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Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 9:54 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I wonder what Chucktown_motown had to say. He was either self-censored or someone did it for him. It's always interesing to see someone's Username as the last poster on a thread then there is no trace of them when you open the thread up. My curiosity always makes me wonder what was up!

Livedog2

(Message edited by livedog2 on September 19, 2006)
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1183
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 10:06 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I missed it again. I thought the last time I missed someone's post I would have thought to look back on the previous page. At least I'm consistent! :-) Welcome, Chucktown_motown to the Polonia Thread on DetroitYES!

By the way D2dyeah I lived in Hollywierd and Marina Del Rey before I came back, too! A couple of my many stops around the country. It's impossible to get Detroit out of your blood. It's like Sister Fabian use to say, "Give them to me for the 1st five (5) years and I'll have them saying Hail Mary on their graves!

Oh well, back to my St. Francis D'Assasi photo preparation.

Livedog2

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Username: Hornwrecker

Post Number: 1620
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 10:10 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

(Once again someone does their initial posting on the wrong page.)

Chucktown_motown wrote:


quote:

Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 10:19 am:

I have spent countless hours in the POletown Neighborhood. I used to take my 79' Jeep CJ-7 there and ride around that neighborhood in the winter-there's alot of open space now with tons of wild pheasants. Had some good friends down there. Kicked it alot. I live in Charleston SC now but I was just home 3 weeks ago. It's can be a bit dangerous, never go down there without my "thumper". I have countless pics. Many of the building still have Polish Names on them from past businesses. Been to the park with the flagpole countless times. Had a pic with my Jeep right next to it. Last place I found in the D to get a Carburator fixed is on Mt Elliott. I really miss that neighborhood. Dispite everything I still feel my Polish roots there. Once vibrant. It's a shame. It really is what has happened to OUR city. Chene Street I got some pics of stuff that will blow your mind and stories too. All those old Polish Churches and businesses. Seen alot happen in that neighborhood over the past 5 yrs, a lot.

Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 10:23 am:


Man I wish I had a scanner to get up some of these pics of Poletown...gotta have the dough to scan pics so you can look at them and scroll...

J Loniewski


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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1184
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 10:26 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You know I thought about writing a book about Detroit Polonia at one time from my perspective along with my photos. But I made a conscious decision not to do that because if I wrote a commercial book it would end up being about the money and not the Detroit Polonia. My theory is that anything done for money ends up being corrupted because the money controllers will always have the final say about things. It’s like that with everything anymore and it is getting like that more and more. It’s the reason I’ve lost my stomach for sports because it’s all about the Benjamin’s anymore. It’s like that in art unless you are self-promoting, marketing and selling. And then you’ve really given up your art to the business. None of it is as pure as the new fallen snow. Maybe it’s naďve of me to think that money corrupts our bliss but that’s what I think and feel.

The point to all this is that the DetroitYES Forum allows me to follow my bliss the way I want to, at the speed I want to, and most importantly with like minded people. I think we’re all looking for our tribe in this modern world and it’s getting harder and harder to find them. But, I have located and identified many on this Forum!

“AHO MITAKUYE OYASIN”

Livedog2
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1185
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 10:28 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hornwrecker, how the hell does that happen? I thought that when a new page starts the old page is closed. Evidently that's not so!

Livedog2
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Hornwrecker
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Username: Hornwrecker

Post Number: 1621
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 10:48 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There's evidently a glitch in the matrix.

I did some minor restoration work on these photos from WSU/VMC labeled "Polish Parade, 1920s". A lot of them have the emulsion deteriorating in the center.

I haven't figured out what street this was down, but I suspect it was Chene.

There is a shoe store named Jos. D?__iel in the mid background. It could be Dudiel, or maybe Gudiel.

Polish Parade 1920s

Polish Parade 1920s

Polish Parade 1920s

Polish Parade 1920s

Polish Parade 1920s
wsu

Any ideas of the location?
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Livedog2
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Username: Livedog2

Post Number: 1186
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 11:44 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

More photos from St. Francis D'Assisi Polish Roman Catholic Church.

The Rectory.
fra
Here's the Rudolph Szafraniec Playground right next door to St. Francis D'Assisi Catholic Church and bounded by Wesson, Rich and Campbell Sts. Maybe this is like Dobrowski Playground on the east side that was named after Rev. Joseph Dabrowski. We know the name of the person that the Rudolph Szafraniec Playground was named after but does anyone have a little history or a bio on said Rudolph Szafraniec?
fra2
The Convent side of the building.
fra3
The whole building with the school in the right side of the photos down and around the corner.
fra4
St. Francis Convent door. With that fence and door they must be expecting an assault by Saracens!
fra5
The side of the church on Buchanan St.
fra6

Livedog2
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Danny
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Username: Danny

Post Number: 5004
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 12:01 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Gone forever is Polonia. Gone forever is Poletown. But it's artifacts and the legacies still lives on.
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D2dyeah
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Username: D2dyeah

Post Number: 15
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 19, 2006 - 12:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Livedog2 Growing up in Detroit among decent, hard working people is what , I think, has made me a good human being. That upbringing has allowed me to survive and flourish here in a city that thrives and values BS.
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Chucktown_motown
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Username: Chucktown_motown

Post Number: 3
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Sunday, September 24, 2006 - 2:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What part do you mean is censored. If your talking about "thumper". Thumper is slang for pistol. It was for all those who know what I'm talking about. I hope there was'nt censorship.
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Chucktown_motown
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Username: Chucktown_motown

Post Number: 4
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Sunday, September 24, 2006 - 2:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There was no Part 3 of this section when I wrote that. There was just one and two. I went to two. It's after one....ya dig???? So now I'm on two and three, three is after two....ya dig???? I jsut so happend to be the last one on two because I'm the greatest there ever, was is and will be....ya dig...........
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Mashugruskie
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Username: Mashugruskie

Post Number: 7
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Sunday, October 01, 2006 - 12:03 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Livedog,

I wanted to post to you regarding Augusta Goike (oldes parishoner of St. Albertus), which I just saw on a previous post but couldn't figure out how to respond. Augusta's maiden name was Lesnau. She was originally married to August Budnik at St. Albertus in 1902. August died after having seven children with Augusta in 1916. Augusta then married Joseph Goike (one of the brothers of Goike's Kashub Snuff). When Augusta Lesnau Budnik Goike died, she was buried next to her first father-in-law, Michael Budnik and wife, Mary Kotlowski. She is in the back section of Section 33 in Mt. Olivet under an old oak tree. I do happen to have photographs of her as a young woman with Joseph Goike. Both the Budnik's and the Goike's were part of my Kreft family.
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Birmingham22
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Username: Birmingham22

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, November 24, 2006 - 7:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello Mashugruskie,

I am doing some family history research for my brother-in-law, Jim Jablonski – he is married to my wife’s sister. The Jablonskis say that their ancestors were from the Ukraine and the name was originally spelled Yablonsky. But I am interested in your Goikes, Kotlowskis, Budniks, and Krefts – which are names from his Mom’s side of the family.

His mother is not quite 74 and her maiden name is Delphine Tosch.

Her parents were Joseph Tosch (1901 Michigan - 1976 Michigan) & Clara Budnik (1900 Michigan - 1978 Michigan).

I have Clara's parents as Joseph Budnik (1866 Poland or Germany - 1905) and Anna (Anastasia) Kreft (1874 Poland or Germany - Unknown). I have Anna Kreft marrying Anthony Goike in 1907.

I have Joseph Budnik's parents as Michael Budnik (1831/32 Germany – between 1887-1900) and Mary Kotlowski (1842 Poland or Germany – Unknown).

I gave Jim’s mother a family tree with this information on it and asked her to add anything she knew about. Next to Mary Kotlowski’s name she wrote, “not correct” – but she did not have a different name to offer. She crossed out Joseph Budnik’s first name and wrote, “Anthony”. I am assuming that she is confusing Anna Kreft’s two husbands in that case.

Anyway, if you are willing to share information you may have, I would really appreciate it – you can reach me at
steveforester@yahoo.com

Thank you.


Steve Forester
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Sl8roof
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Username: Sl8roof

Post Number: 4
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 21, 2009 - 11:59 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Reading the history of Father Kolosinski and the founding of St. Albertus is fascinating, especially for someone who grew up in the St Stanislaus neighborhood and sent kidergarten through 8th grade there in it's school. It's amazing to see the airial shots of the old polish ghetto, with the houses packed together and little open space anywhere. Today, that's about all that's let is open space. It's true what someone said earler that this stuff is somehow imbedded into you; part of who we are.
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Reddog289
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Username: Reddog289

Post Number: 868
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Sunday, January 25, 2009 - 3:56 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Being a Grandson of German Lutheran upbringing, It is funny how So much of my upbringing can be just the same as if I were brought up Polish Catholic.

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