Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 1900 Detroit census Previous Next
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Ray1936
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Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 200
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 - 12:56 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Being an amateur genealogist, I'm constantly going through reels of microfilm to find ancestors. Now that most of the census reports have been digitalized, it's a lot easier to browse. Tonight, I stumbled on a most interesting entry on the 1900 U.S. Census for Detroit.

Living at 1293 Second street (don't forget the Detroit street numbering system was radically changed around WW I) we find:

FORD, Henry Head Jul 1863 36 12 Engineer
---- Clara Wife Apr 1866 33 12 -
---- Edsel Son Nov 1893 6 -

That's it; no servants, etc. The first column to the right of the years is for "age", next to that, "number of years married". I imagine in 1900 he was working for the Edison company while he tinkered with his automobiles in his Bagley workshop. Anyway, these old census reports are fascinating. I also located David Whitney at 443 Woodward with his wife, one son, and five servants in the home. He shows his occupation as "Capitalist".

Anybody you all might like me to look up and post?
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Aaron
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Username: Aaron

Post Number: 104
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 69.241.224.171
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 - 1:56 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

THE BOOK OF DETROITERS

A Biographical Dictionary of
Leading Living Men of the City of Detroit
Edited by Albert Nelson Marquis
Chicago
A. N. Marquis & Company
1908

Copyright, 1908 by Albert Nelson Marquis


FORD, Henry; born, Greenfield, Mich., July 30, 1863; son of William and Mary (Litegott) Ford; educated in district school, Greenfield; married at Greenfield, Apr. 11, 1888, Clara J. Bryant. Came to Detroit, 1887; formerly chief engineer Edison Illuminating Co.; has been engaged in manufacture and sale of automobiles as the Ford Motor Co. since Mar. 16, 1903. Member Detroit Board of Commerce. Mason. Clubs: Fellowcraft, Automobile Club of America, New York Automobile Club. Recreations: Automobiling and hunting. Office: Cor. Piquette and Beaubien Sts. Residence: 145 Harper Av.


http://www.usgennet.org/usa/mi /county/tuscola/det/
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 83
Registered: 10-2004
Posted From: 69.242.223.42
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 - 2:16 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The Springwells/Greenfield (now Detroit/Dearborn) boundary was Baby Creek (west of Woodmere Cemetery).

Around 1920 Greenfield became Springwells again.

Later changes for Ford's (Ford Rd. and Greenfield) location during the 1920s:
Fordson - named for Ford & Son after he threatened to have Detroit annex the Rouge plant if the name change did not occur)
Dearborn
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Lowell
Board Administrator
Username: Lowell

Post Number: 2187
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 66.167.58.137
Posted on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 - 2:44 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

...and planted tnot hat far away at Joy and Greenfield....
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Eastsidechris
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Username: Eastsidechris

Post Number: 70
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 4.229.114.110
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 12:06 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ray, where did you find the census info online?
I've been wanting to reseach who originally owned my home, which was built in 1929. Everytime I've done an online search for it, it says that it's all on microfilm.
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Leoqueen
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Username: Leoqueen

Post Number: 954
Registered: 07-2004
Posted From: 152.163.100.8
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 12:44 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Eastsidechris, if your house was built in 1929, then the people who lived in it were most likely enumerated in the 1930 census. If you can trace the history of the house and find those names, you can go to Ancestry.com and find it easily. I have been a subscriber for about 5 years now to do genealogical research, and have been amazed at what can be found.
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 208
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 1:51 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Chris, Leoqueen is correct; the only problem is it is a subscription service. The census index and images cost, I think, a hundred bucks for one year. There is another service called Heritage Quest that also has index and images also for a fee; however, many libraries subscribe to it and you can connect through your local library's web site if you have a library card. Worth a try.

I get on to Heritage Quest through the Clark county (NV) library's website. As Leoqueen notes; it is fascinating surfing.

For what it's worth, I've traced my direct male lineage right back to Chester county, Pennsylvania, on the very first U.S. Census in 1790 (they arrived from England in 1717).
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Leoqueen
Member
Username: Leoqueen

Post Number: 956
Registered: 07-2004
Posted From: 69.221.36.169
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 12:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks, Ray....I have subscribed for so long to Ancestry.com with automatic fee deduction that I forgot about the fees. I also go to the Mormon site, http://www.familysearch.org/, which is free, but their search perimeters are not as vast as Ancestry. Still, Chris, you might have some luck with peripheral searches at this site. I have lost much sleep by staying up all night going to these places! I really love Familysearch.org, because it was there I was able to find out the correct names and marriage dates of my paternal great-great grandparents, who were born as slaves in Alabama circa 1850! This discovery was made at 4:30 one morning....I let out a WHOOP that woke my whole house!
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 210
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 2:18 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Heh, heh, heh....how I know that feeling, Leoqueen! Been there, done that, as they say.

I guess we should mention that the LDS site (www.familysearch.com) does have the 1880 U.S. Census indexed and on line FOR FREE. The original images are not there, but the transcribed data is.
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Susanarosa
Member
Username: Susanarosa

Post Number: 690
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 208.39.170.90
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 3:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks to Leoqueen and Ray I have just wasted my entire lunch hour finding family members on family search.

Great stuff. Unfortunately I can't get any further than my great-grandparents (on both sides) though.
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Jimaz
Member
Username: Jimaz

Post Number: 69
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 68.2.191.57
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 3:30 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A dear aunt traced our Michigan lineage all the way back to a foot soldier in the American Revolution. The disappointment was that his unit seemed fixated only on what kind of booze they'd find each day. <sigh>
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 211
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 6:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jimaz, there always seems to be good news/bad news when researching ancestors. I was always told that great grandpop Lt. B.H.Downing was at the Battle of Gettysburg. His 1908 obituary (which I have) repeats that fact. Then I studied the movement of his unit, the 49th PA Volunteers. Well, turns out he was at Gettysburg on July 1-3, 1863, all right, but his regiment was kept in reserve near Little Round Top and never saw action.

On the other hand, probably lucky for me......
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Livernoisyard
Member
Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 103
Registered: 10-2004
Posted From: 69.242.223.42
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 6:40 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It could have been worse, Ray. He might have come from a long line of feeble-minded cretins...
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Susanarosa
Member
Username: Susanarosa

Post Number: 692
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 208.39.170.90
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 6:42 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I just found out that my great grandfather has appeared to have children with three different women...
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Crew
Member
Username: Crew

Post Number: 805
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 146.9.52.18
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 6:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Scandalous!
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Jimaz
Member
Username: Jimaz

Post Number: 70
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 68.2.191.57
Posted on Saturday, January 21, 2006 - 10:05 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sometimes the skeletons in the family closet can be colorful. I think my parents were embarrassed to reveal our "carny" relatives in Michigan. Turns out one of them manufactured carnival highstrikers under the "Mooremade" brand. Patrons would whack highstrikers with a heavy mallet to ring a bell at the top to win a prize. I later learned of all the ingenious ways highstrikers could be rigged to cheat patrons. By today's standards, cons like that seem laughably innocent.

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