Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 Memories Previous Next
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Jjw
Member
Username: Jjw

Post Number: 58
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 68.33.56.156
Posted on Friday, March 03, 2006 - 7:17 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is a thought that I hope gets some response. I grew up in Detroit--not the suburbs--went to Catholic schools in the city and graduated from Wayne State. I now live in Baltimore and have been for awhile. I joined the thread because I still hold a lot of interest in the city of Detroit and I am excited about the progress I see happening in the city.
As mentioned, I have been in Baltimore for awhile now. Both cities have a lot in common. I won't get into that but I do wonder about something. It seems to me that many folks in the thread always write about how wonderful things used to be in Detroit and hope that the city can somehow live up to those expectations. Baltimore was no paradise. But, there is a difference that is remarkable. Folks here do not consistently chat about the past. They love the changes that have occured and look forward to more. When we speak about neighborhoods or the CBD, it is never about what used to be there but what it has become. I guess my point is that maybe things were not so wonderful years ago in Detroit. Maybe there were unaddressed issues that have still not been resolved which have an impact on currect development.
I get back to Detroit at least twice a year and every time I go back, I am amazed at the progress. Is the city the same without Hudsons and Tiger Stadium? No---but is it worse--No.
I guess what I am saying is sometimes those memories have to be let go for true progress to occur. I don't know. It sounds like I am ranting. I will leave it at that.
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Leoqueen
Member
Username: Leoqueen

Post Number: 1109
Registered: 07-2004
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Friday, March 03, 2006 - 7:30 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No, you are not ranting. I used to hear my father talk about the 30's in Detroit, when he and his brothers would take the Baker Streetcar to get to the movies, and they could have a good time and only need a total of 50 cents to see the flick, eat candy, and get back home. Were those the good old days?

Sure, he remembered them fondly, but he always reminded me that that was in the past and that THESE [the present] are the good days.

I think you started a great thread, and I am curious as to the respons from the forum.
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Jjaba
Member
Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3212
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Friday, March 03, 2006 - 7:50 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Fond memories do not eliminate current pleasures in Detroit. Things are different for each generation. In jjaba's case, a kid in Detroit 1940s, doesn't have the same pleasures as two generations later in 2006. Tiger Stadium and the street cars were good then, but now we have other treasures to enjoy. jjaba thinks the Baker line was on the "other" side of town".

jjaba, never only look back.
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Jimaz
Member
Username: Jimaz

Post Number: 291
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 68.2.191.57
Posted on Friday, March 03, 2006 - 8:09 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The exhilaration of a burgeoning auto industry must have been very similar to the heady days in Silicon Valley and it lasted so much longer! Memories of growth can translate to anticipation of growth.

Great thread starter, Jjw! Let's plug this right up front:
http://info.detnews.com/histor y/index.cfm
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Hysteria
Member
Username: Hysteria

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Saturday, March 04, 2006 - 1:03 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

History cannot be changed and Detroit contributed to American history in ways that changed all of our lives. Think about WWII. With the largest skilled workforce in the country (world?) at the dawn of the U.S.'s involvement in WWII, Detroit was truly the arsenal of democracy. What other city could have stepped up as Detroit did? The city put the U.S. on the global map with it's industrial muscle, mass production methods, business strategy, etc. Nothing will ever change the role the original big 'D' played in American history. Motown changed music. The automobile changed the face of America forever ... Americans have short memories. That said, nothing lasts forever; however, history cannot be rewritten ... The city has already accomplished, in record time, more than most American cities could ever dream of accomplishing ... New positive memories/experiences are created in Detroit almost daily now, with all of the development activity, that we share with others. I would say this is a great time for the city.
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Jjaba
Member
Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3217
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Saturday, March 04, 2006 - 1:39 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Welcome to The Forum Hysteria. (We also have a Hysteric so beware).

Having waxed eloquently, let jjaba remind you that Mass Production methods were borrowed from Swift Packing House in Chicago. Henry Ford modeled his assembly line after the hog butcher operation of Chicago Stock Yards.

jjaba on the Westside.
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 336
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Saturday, March 04, 2006 - 2:17 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Speaking as an old fart, I can safely say that the older you get, the more you think of the past. A healthy mind remembers all the good times; the warm times; the funny times. The nasty things that might have happened take on a "well, we sure got over THAT hump" feeling. And that's good.

I once heard a phrase that is so true. "Young people talk of the future because they have no past. Old people talk of the past because they have no future."

A little harsh, but I submit it as truth.

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