Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 High-stakes transit talks in Lansing Previous Next
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Detroitman
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Username: Detroitman

Post Number: 945
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 216.78.51.198
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 7:00 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Momentum shift

High-stakes transit talks in Lansing

by Keith Schneider
3/29/2006
http://www.metrotimes.com/edit orial/story.asp?id=9045

Here's another article that is related to the first one.
Back track

Fifty years after the Motor City rode the rails

by Michael Jackman
3/29/2006
http://www.metrotimes.com/edit orial/story.asp?id=9040
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Dougw
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Username: Dougw

Post Number: 1048
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 136.1.1.33
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 3:43 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

(from the first article)

quote:

The spotlights in downtown Detroit had just been turned off. It was three days past the big Super Bowl XL weekend and Roger Penske, the host committee chairman, addressed a genuinely impassioned crowd of executives at a packed Marriott luncheon. He told his business peers that he was devoted to "continuing the momentum" of Detroit's revival, and he described his enthusiasm for what he believed should be the city's next big project: constructing a modern rapid transit system.

"I'm here to tell you today that I'm ready to join the effort," Penske said. "Right here and right now."

Since 1981, when San Diego built the new light rail line that started its remarkable downtown resurgence, 39 other cities have opened new streetcar, light rail and commuter rail systems in the United States. Jobs, housing, businesses and economic opportunity blossomed. And every city that built a new rapid transit system, and in the 40 more cities that are planning to build one, a leader stepped forward as the principal advocate. Minneapolis' two-year-old Hiawatha line wouldn't have been built without independent Gov. Jesse Ventura's advocacy. Denver's new 154-mile rapid transit system turned on the support of Joe Blake, the conservative chief of the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

It is not known whether Penske's public challenge was followed by private advocacy for rapid transit with the Democratic governor or Republican leaders. But for the first time in generations, Detroit and the state appear to actually be drawing closer, instead of running desperately away from a commitment to join the rest of the country by pursuing new transit lines.

Negotiations between Gov. Jennifer Granholm's administration and Republican legislative leaders have been under way since February over a bill that would give local governments the authority to raise money for new transit systems, a requirement to secure hundreds of millions of dollars in federal engineering and construction funds.

Detroit's city government, according to one of Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick's top aides, now views improving its bus lines and building a regional rapid transit system as top priorities for economic development. ...



Three cheers for Roger Penske!! :-) This region really does need a uniting figure such as Mr. Penske to make a good transit plan happen.

From reading the latter part of the article, it might be good if he could put a headlock on House Speaker Craig DeRoche as well...
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 270
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 6:29 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hopefully common sense wins over political games on this one. Michiganders have been paying to build rapid transit systems in other states for too long. It is time that Michigan taps into this federal money instead of paying to improve the quality of life of competing regions.

Also, considering the massive federal deficit, one can only guess how long this money will continue to be available.
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Eric
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Username: Eric

Post Number: 390
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 35.11.210.161
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 9:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'd love to see that headlock of DeRoche. Transit needs an adovacate like Penske, Republican shitheads like DeRoche will be more willing to cooperate; if a very respected person with a strong business background supports it.

(Message edited by eric on March 29, 2006)
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Alexei289
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Username: Alexei289

Post Number: 1087
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.61.183.223
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 10:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

... that guy is cancer to this region as much as the clownsil is....
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Mikeg
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Username: Mikeg

Post Number: 35
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 69.136.155.244
Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 - 10:38 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Getting a new mass transit system built is one thing, operating it successfully is quite another.

Given the track record of our current bus systems, I wouldn't want to see one dime of Federal, State or local tax dollars spent until there is evidence that that it would be operated for the benefit of the commuters instead of the managers, contractors and employees of the transit system.

Immediate reorganization of the two existing bus systems into one that is convenient, reliable, clean and safe would go a long way towards building local (and outstate) public support for mass transit in SE Michigan.
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Fishtoes2000
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Username: Fishtoes2000

Post Number: 88
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 69.14.26.135
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 12:07 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

From an operating or customer perspective, is there a benefit to Detroit having its own bus service? (Or should I start a new thread?)
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Bob
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Username: Bob

Post Number: 883
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 11:24 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Can you imagine if DeVos is elected governor how Metro Detroit will be treated, this transit bill is only the tip of the iceberg.
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Danindc
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Username: Danindc

Post Number: 1375
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.100.158.10
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 11:52 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay, what if DeVos is elected? He's a successful businessman, right? It doesn't take a lot of acumen to realize that Michigan's economy is headed right down the crapper. The old ways of doing things just don't work anymore.

If anything, I think DeVos might be better suited to increase spending on transit, and finally get something up and running in Detroit, if not a statewide rail system. Granholm has been hindered by idiot Republicans like Craig DeRoche, and it doesn't help that her main argument for improving cities is to make them "cool". DeVos, I think, would be able to establish a business-case, and explain to members of his own party how investments in transit would improve Michigan's economic competitiveness, as they have in other states.

Just my $.02.
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Jsmyers
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Username: Jsmyers

Post Number: 1514
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 209.131.7.68
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 12:59 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thats what you might think Dan.

But unfortunately many Michigan Republican's (not all) are more concerned about certain types of economic profit, and idealogical purity (in their eyes) than they are concerned with real improvements in the state's economy.

For example: The desire to repeal the SBT without a replacement revenue source when the size of our state government is in line with reality.

In this case, the ideology is that taxes are bad.

In the transit case, the ideology is that government shouldn't be involved in the service, especially Detroit government. Roads still pay for themselves in many polotician's eyes.

However, I'm confident that this attitude is turning the corner.
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Bob
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Username: Bob

Post Number: 884
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 1:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And the fact that DeVos is an egangelical Christian, and has shown this through his major funding of pro-school voucher fight, being a MAJOR contributor to the Republican party worries me that he will be more concerned of being right than what the people want (ala George W.). He is definitely a spoiled rich kid that is out of touch with reality.

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