Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 Anybody been on the Ford Rouge tour? Previous Next
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Xphillipjrx
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Username: Xphillipjrx

Post Number: 119
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.75.240.133
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 4:16 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I remember taking a field trip to see the Ford Rouge complex. We saw molten steel, the Mustang assembly line and I remember I got really dirty. Is there still a tour available and have any of you been on it recently?
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Sknutson
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Username: Sknutson

Post Number: 511
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 67.114.23.202
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 4:25 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was on it last summer. Never was on the earlier one. No more viewing of molten steel; a nice tour of the new state of the art truck plant (building F-150's).

Be sure to book a tour early enough in the day to see assembly.
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Psip
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Username: Psip

Post Number: 1067
Registered: 04-2005
Posted From: 69.246.13.131
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 4:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think we should let Jjaba answer this question.
In 3...2...1...
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Everydayislikesunday
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Username: Everydayislikesunday

Post Number: 232
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 68.41.153.99
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 12:25 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Surprisingly, I liked this tour. I went on the tour without having any interest in seeing it at all (I work at The Henry Ford, and it was "strongly suggested"). I actually walked away from the experience having enjoyed the tour, even though I wasnt initially interested in the production aspect of the tour. This new tour (opened in May of 2004) is a 5 part tour of the final assembly area of the Dearborn Truck Plant (one of the videos you will see before you enter the assembly area will show you all of the things that happen before that). The tours are running 6 days a week now from 930 to 230. Beginning on April 16th, they tours will return to 7 days.

If you're interested in booking a tour, I would recommend a weekday morning tour. It takes about two and a half hours to see the entire thing, but you can stay as long as you like (last bus leaves at 515pm). There is a shift change that occurs in the afternoon, but since it is apparently on a rotating schedule is hard to predict. The Henry Ford never guarantees production (i believe jjaba saw a no production day, and was less than thrilled), and they will not exchange or refund, so keep that in mind. There is also a list of scheduled Ford holidays on the website which will be non production days.

Here's the website in case you're interested.
http://www.thehenryford.org/ro uge/default.asp
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Detroit1969
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Username: Detroit1969

Post Number: 33
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 69.212.41.150
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 1:11 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Having toured both plants, I'd say the old factory was more impressive. It was really something, a colossal place that grew by accretion, full of little details and history. The new tour is designed to hype Ford's green initiatives.
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Motorcitymayor2026
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Username: Motorcitymayor2026

Post Number: 668
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 24.231.189.137
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 1:55 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jjaba!!!
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3569
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 1:54 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba had the world's worst industrial tour at the Ford Rouge since the invention of an assembly line.

The basic rule of having an assembly line moving is the flaw in the program. The Ford Museum refunded jjaba and friends' money and reinvited us to return for free. Ain't likely.

All the pop crap with the movies and the shows should be replaced with more plants, more touring, and the hiring of really skilled and knowledgable docents. Touring should only occur when a plant is running. PERIOD.

jjaba asked a simple question as he walked through a quiet, idle factory catwalk, so far from the "action" (if there was any), they had to install tv cameras.

jjaba's question is simple. We are at Ford's Rouge where an entire car was produced from raw materials to a moving vehicle. "Today, what percentage of this Ford 150 Truck, down there is produced here at The Rouge?"

After letters, phone calls, emails, and a dozen semi-skilled fumbling mumbling staff, nobody can tell me. Maybe everydayislikesunday can tell us. Good luck.

jjaba and his guests were nonplussed with this nonsense. He had gone to The Rouge as a schoolboy for many years and it was incredible. We saw the glass plant, engine plane, forge, molten iron, stamping, tires production, and always final assembly. We were given a nice map of The Rouge and could draw the line we traversed. The docents were great and they kept us between the yellow lines, and hands out of the bins. Amazing place, Mr Henry.

jjaba, but don't get me started.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3570
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 2:05 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba's question is, "Anybody got an industrial tour, autos or otherwise, worth going to?"

jjaba went on an all-day tour of GM Lansing. The morning was at Body Shop, where we rode in a little tram on the factory floor and saw bodies of Grand-Ams being built (the one with the sparks flying and cinders hitting you.) The afternoon was at Final Assembly, watching two lines of Grand-Ams rolling side by side. It was incredible.

The docents were skilled, we could talk to workers on the line or in breakrooms, and we were given materials about production.

jjaba also had a nice tour of Final Assembly of Lincolns at Wixom. Ofcourse, that factory is shuttered. The tours were run by retirees of the plant and was well done also.

In each example, we were given a specific reservation and individual letter where and when to show up.

jjaba had a private tour at Manchester, Michigan where they make door panels for GM. We learned all about plastics and given a sociology lesson about Mexican workers who live in Jackson working in an outsourcing minimum wage operation. This was also an excellent experience.

jjaba.
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Everydayislikesunday
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Username: Everydayislikesunday

Post Number: 233
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 68.41.153.99
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 6:13 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I understand your frustration with the lack of knowlegeable docents, jjaba. I asked who the architectural firm was that designed the Truck Plant(not the Glass Plant). They told me very confidentally, "Albert Kahn". One slight problem -- Kahn died almost 60 years before it was built. I won't be back in the office until Wed (home opener on Monday), but I'm sure I can get the answers to your question(s).

I have also heard someone say that a mustang plant near Atlanta gives production tours. I would be interested to know what other tours are offered and how the compare.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3574
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 7:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mustangs are now made at the plant on Hank the Deuce Drive, near Atlanta? jjaba thought they made Tauras and Sables. It is an excellent Ford facility. Good products, good working conditions, jobs for life, etc. If management can give them some cars to build that sells, they are an excellent plant.

Everydayislikesunday, thanks for cleaning that Rouge tour up. It is in great need of help. In its present form, it is a sham, and a shame. Glad you heard that Albert Kahn built the new plant with sedum roof. That's a laugher!
Maybe Ford should forgo the tax credits for hiring the chronically unemployed and get somebody in there who knows something. There are probably industrial history majors who would thrive in a job like that.

Yes, was percentage of the pieces of the trucks are made at the Rouge? You'd be the 12th person to tackle my question. Your Director sure as hell doesn't know.

jjaba, tells it like it tis.
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The_rock
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Username: The_rock

Post Number: 1101
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 68.42.251.225
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 7:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I back you jjaba on your concern that we went to a tour of an advertised working assembly plant, but there was no one working and there was no assembly. It was as quite as a confessional.(Not sure that's a proper analogy for you to fully appreciate.)
I did not ask for a refund because FMC was in financial trouble and I did not want to push them over the edge. And sure enough, today's paper( Business section) reports that young Billy Ford's compensation is DOWN about 40% to a pultry $13.3 million. So I feel good about not seeking reimbursement of my tour fee. (You gotta admit at least we got a nice bus ride out of it).

But, as I understand Jewish tradition, in the Tefilah Zaka on Erev Yom Kippur ( this Sept?), there is a prayer recited wherein you extend COMPLETE forgivness to all who may have harmed you. So come back this summer, I will pop for the tour, we will pick a date when there is actual assembly, lots of noise, no strikes, no sit-downs,not even a coffee break, and we can give Ford ANOTHER chance.
Dwight Gooden got another chance ( maybe even 4 chances) We should let Billy have one more himself.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3577
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 8:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba will be back on the Rouge Plant tour when everydayislikesunday takes jjaba, The Rock, et. al. and PETE ROSE in inducted into the Hall of Fame.

As for Yom Kippur, jjaba will keep your suggestions in mind.

jjaba has been to confessional at the Vatican. Remember, he was raised in St. Brigit's Parish on the Westside. The Rock is right. It is as quiet as downtown Detroit on a Monday night.

jjaba, what a lovely bus ride in Dearborn.
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Dan_cluley
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Username: Dan_cluley

Post Number: 7
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 207.179.99.160
Posted on Sunday, April 09, 2006 - 4:14 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jjaba, I toured the Lansing Assembly plant back in 1985, and am glad, as they began demolishion about two weeks ago. The body plant is closed as well, and is supposed to come down later this year. I have heard of tours at the new Lansing plant (Cadillac CTS/STX/STS)but haven't had the chance to see it yet.
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East_detroit
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Username: East_detroit

Post Number: 568
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 69.212.169.194
Posted on Sunday, April 09, 2006 - 8:45 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mustangs are made in Flat Rock, Michigan.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3581
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 3:56 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the info. about Lansing and the Flat Rock Ford Plant. Amazing, they are still selling Mustangs.

jjaba.
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Jerome81
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Username: Jerome81

Post Number: 963
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 64.142.86.133
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 4:04 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mustangs are only made in Flat Rock. The Atlanta assembly, I believe, is one of the Ford facilities slated to close.
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Karl
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Username: Karl

Post Number: 1929
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 68.230.22.99
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 4:31 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I took my first Rouge tour in 1960 (iron ore carriers, molten steel, rolling mill, stamping plant, glass, etc etc then finally Galaxies) It was noisy, dirty & fabulous. I toured it many times in years following (I think last tour they were making Mustangs) going through whenever friends/relatives came to town and wanted to take the tour. No cameras were allowed even in the earliest days. One eerie memory: on every tour, regardless of whether school group, tourists, Scouts or whoever, there was always a group of Japanese businessmen, all in dark suits, silently & seriously touring, looking, watching along with whatever boisterous group I happened to be with. It seems in those days one couldn't give away a Japanese car in the USA for they were junk. I remember thinking "how great that these Japanese guys could finish whatever business they were in Detroit doing so that they could come on this fun tour." oops.

In approx 1967 I got to tour Cadillac's Clark Street plant (where all Caddys were born in those days) and was pulled off the tour by a supt who was a family friend who took me on what he referred to as "a real tour" and it was - we went high up on catwalks, thru trap doors that said "Do Not Enter - High Voltage" and other sorts of fun for a boy.

For those of you that remember the "Circle Theatre" at Disneyland (or whatever it was called) where they had the movie all around you, and it was a tour thru the US and some of the industries that were throughout America, it always bugged me that the auto industry was ignored - and what better subject for a 360-degree camera system than the Ford assembly plant, with multi-colored fenders, doors, hoods and other assorted auto parts dangling & moving all around, with parts miraculously converging on a car with the same color - it was like being inside of a watch, but better. I never tired of going - and have often thought that those tours handed our Japanese friends everything they needed to improve their lousy cars so that they could turn around and sell them to us. Yes, I know it wasn't as simple as that, but those were the days when Detroit/Dearborn/Michigan held all the cards when it came to cars.
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Aarne_frobom
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Username: Aarne_frobom

Post Number: 17
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 162.108.2.222
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 11:08 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I went on the new Ford Rouge Plant "tour" with the Society for Industrial Archeology tour of Detroit last fall. This was nothing like the real tour of the plant I remember as a kid from around 1967. As has been pointed out above, back then you got a tour of the whole plant. The memories I have from the sixties tour are of how everything in the steel mill was hot to the touch, even the stair rails; and of the front fenders coming to join the rest of the carbody, having been painted on a separate line. Then I understood why sixties Fords' front fenders were often a slightly different color from the rest of the car, something I have never seen an antique-car restorer duplicate. Of course, the steel mill is now under separate ownership. (The SIA tour returned to the Rouge by boat, and it was fun to see the steel-mill guards react to a boatload of camera-wielding tourists cruise through their plant on the public waterway).

At the new plant tour, you see a small museum with a summarized history of the plant. There is a second-story overlook of the plant, from which much of downriver is visible. The whole thing has been farmed out to a P.R. firm, and is highly sanitized. The actual plant tour is a self-guided walk on a balcony over the truck-cab final assembly line. You can go at your own pace, but you don't get to see much of the whole process of assembling a truck.

Also there was no one to ask why there was a long row of trucks parked at the end of the line, receiving individual work. I would like to think there were being modified to meet some special order, and not getting last-minute repairs of defects.

The tour is worth doing, especially if you're a fan of corporate P.R. You get to see the "green" roof, of which much has been made in the announcements of the company. One thing that hasn't changed: you'll still feel a little like a geek for staring at the workers, just like the clueless middle-class tourists of the Rouge that Diego River painted into his DIA mural in 1932.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3586
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 5:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Aarne, your desciptions are incredible. You tell it like it was and like it tis. Karl, the same.

jjaba had Rouge tours in the 1940s and 1950s.
School group tours. Those memories linger awright.

jjaba thinks the queue of Ford 150s at the end of the line are for factory defects on inspection. Sounds like the hospital inspections/repairs.

jjaba, thanks for the memories and the boat experience.
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Psip
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Username: Psip

Post Number: 1070
Registered: 04-2005
Posted From: 69.246.13.131
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 11:42 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Psip went on tours of:
Dodge Main 60's
Ford Rouge 70's
Opal in Belgium 70's
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3590
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 12:00 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba's tours are:
Ford Rouge, 1940, 1950s.
Ford F-150 Rouge disaster tour, 2000s.
Cadillac, Clark Street, 1950, 1960s.
GM Lansing, 1990s
Ford Cork, Ireland, 1970s.
Ford Wixom, 2000s.
Jeep, Toledo, 1990s.
Outsource door panel shop, Manchester, Mich. 1990s.
Louisville Slugger, Louisville, KY. 2000s.
Hershey's, Hershey, Pa. 1990s.
Wonder Brerad, Grand River Ave., 1940s.
Tillamook Cheese, Oregon, 2000s.
Boise Cascade Mill, Emmett, Idaho, 1970s.
Simplot Potatoes, Heyburn, Idaho, 1980s.
jjaba.
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Aarne_frobom
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Username: Aarne_frobom

Post Number: 18
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 162.108.2.222
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 11:54 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Boy, there is a serious plant-tour addict. I notice you didn't mention the Kellogg's cereal-plant tour, another case where the actual plant tour has been replaced by a sanitized replica/museum. The company says this is for reasons of security, but whether they don't want competitors or customers to know what really goes into Froot Loops is unsaid.

The Society for Industrial Archeology 2005 Detroit tour included the Budd stamping plant, a gorgeous facility in a mix of old buildings, and New Center Stamping, producing short-run and replacement parts on old dies in an old GM stamping plant. It was a real treat to see this process up close. Everyone sees the results of metal stamping every day, but even in Detroit few get to see it without being hired to actually feed the presses by hand. Or unless they watch the eminem movie, which was photographed at New Center Stamping.

Last fall's tour was the second time the SIA toured Detroit, precisely 25 years after the last tour. Of the sites seen in 1980, most were gone in 2005:
Cadillac Clark Street
Detroit Edison downriver plant
Chrysler glass plant on Wyoming

The new GM plant at Lansing is occasionally opened for tours on one Saturday a year, during the "Be A Tourist In Your Home Town" promotion, probably coming up again in a few weeks. The line is not working during this event. As with the new Rouge overlook, only the final body assembly line is available, but it makes an interesting contrast with Ford's Dearborn Truck plant. The Lansing plant uses powered dollies for each car, not a chain assembly line.
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Mikeydbn
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Username: Mikeydbn

Post Number: 311
Registered: 04-2004
Posted From: 35.11.191.18
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 12:18 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jjaba hasn't been on the Jiffy Mix factory tour?
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3592
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 3:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No jiffy Mix tour yet.

Yes, jjaba went on Kelloggs tour, 1960s.
Sad to hear it has changed.

Another truly awful tour is Tabasco Sauce, Avery Island, Louisiana. We drove 3 hrs. from New Orleans through some wonderful scenery but the destination was pathetic for an industrial tour.

Can you post the SIA information? jjaba has heard about them. The Soc. of Architectural Historians has also toured Detroit auto plant ruins.

jjaba has done some personal baseball archeology by hisself and with SABRE. He's seen the sites of Sportsmans Park in St, Louis, Braves Field in Boston, League Park in Cleveland, Fairview Park in Detroit. It is interesting. There are guidebooks giving wonderful details.

jjaba.
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Karl
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Username: Karl

Post Number: 1938
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 4:43 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Does Jjaba agree that after seeing how Tabasco is made (seems like it was aged for years in barrels with 3" salt on top, oozes thru when ready??) it might be classified "borderline toxic waste?" Been on that tour. In the middle of the swamps & bayous - quaint, but definitely not the Rouge Complex.....

Have not been on either of these, but friends recently told me that they toured the Corvette Plant and Toyota Plant on the same trip (both in/near Louisville KY?) and while they enjoyed the Vette plant, said the Toyota plant was truly amazing, more automation than any they had ever been on previously - and these folks tour everything.
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Aarne_frobom
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Username: Aarne_frobom

Post Number: 19
Registered: 10-2005
Posted From: 162.108.2.222
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 5:31 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The Society for Industrial Archeology web site is at sia@mtu.edu

Or write SIA at
Department of Social Sciences
Michigan Technological University
1400 Townsend Drive
Houghton, MI 49931-1295

You get 4 16-page newsletters a year with news and bibliographies of industrial sites, and their research journal of papers on old industries. The Society is aimed at historians of industry, labor, engineering and economics; museum curators and archeologists; preservationists and redevelopers; and anybody who foams at the mouth over old structures and technologies.

The guys who run the historic-preservation program at MTU do a bang-up job of editing the newsletter.

I consider the dues to be cheap at $35/year, or $40 for the whole family. (If you can get your wife and kids to visit iron foundries and coke ovens. I came to the Detroit tour alone, but made the family view the Piquette Avenue plant en route to the taqueria on Bagley last week, telling them, "Look carefully at this building. This is where the world changed.") The SIA tour held a dinner in the 3rd-floor museum in this plant.
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56packman
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Username: 56packman

Post Number: 190
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 129.9.163.234
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 5:53 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Back in '68 my cub scout troupe and I went on the tour of the Velvet peanut butter factory in (far away) Livonia, where we learned the secret of how the "Goober and Grape" peanut butter and jelly product was placed in the jar with it's perfectly vertical "stripes" we each got a jar to take home. My Den mother used to load the whole pack in her '55 Buick Century and schlep us to Cranbrook, the Franklin Cider mill, the Detroit children's museum. Aarne--you must know my Fox theatre pals who are in the SIA
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Hornwrecker
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Username: Hornwrecker

Post Number: 1035
Registered: 04-2005
Posted From: 216.203.223.115
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 5:56 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://www.sia-web.org/
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3596
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 7:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Many thanks for the SIA info. jjaba will join them.

jjaba eats cherry bon bons. In all his touring of chocolate factories, nobody has ever allowed jjaba to see how the cherry gets in the bon bon.
Will SIA help jjaba with this one?

56packman, from jjaba's back porch, we could smell the Shedd's and Velvet peanut butter factories on Livernois growing up. Detroit wasn't only cars ya know.

jjaba adds breweries and wineries to his list.
In Spain, they open a bung hole and let you swill right from the keg. Chicago candy bar factories were fun to watch.

Just remember that it was Henry Ford's visit of Swift and Armour in Chicago that turned on his headlight about assembly lines. Piquette Avenue is important, but...

jjaba, tells it like it tis.
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Aiw
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Username: Aiw

Post Number: 5457
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 64.228.196.197
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 7:36 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Karl, the Corvette plant is in Blowling Green, KY, and Toyota is likely the Elizabethtown, KY plant.
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The_rock
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Username: The_rock

Post Number: 1108
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 68.42.251.225
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 8:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a law suit for Kowalski Sausage Company many moons ago. I had to go to the plant to interview a worker on the line and I saw how sausages are made. Once was enough.
It's like chocolate ice cream. "Everyone loves it, you just don't want to see how it's made."
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 3600
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 67.160.138.107
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 4:43 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Two things you don't want to see made.
Laws and sausage.

jjaba.
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Everydayislikesunday
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Username: Everydayislikesunday

Post Number: 238
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 68.41.153.99
Posted on Tuesday, April 18, 2006 - 6:48 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba -- this is the response that I received from the Floor Supervisor at the Ford Rouge Factor Tour.

"The answer to your question is 100 % of the F-150 parts come from outside sources.

I am very sorry that it took so long to get an answer for you. We like to make sure we are dead right when we answer these questions. On Thursday of last week I phoned your office and told them to tell you the answer. I guess you never got the message. I apologize once again.

Thanks again for being so patient."

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