Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 A loss from Wayne County and Detroit! Previous Next
Top of pageBottom of page

Danny
Member
Username: Danny

Post Number: 3959
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 141.217.174.229
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 9:42 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Recent data from SEMCOG reported that the population of Wayne County is now under 1,989, 000 Million people. In late 2007, Macomb County 840,000 population will surpass Detroit's 872,000 people. What does this means from metropolitan's image?
Top of pageBottom of page

Matt
Member
Username: Matt

Post Number: 1035
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 208.49.95.12
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 10:02 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Um, absolutely nothing because Macomb County is a COUNTY. If you want to look at figures, take Detroit out of Wayne County's totals and they surpass Detroit in population at 1,117,000! *gasp* What does that mean for the metropolitan's image?!
Top of pageBottom of page

Eastsidedog
Member
Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 209
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 1:54 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Detroit increasingly becomes a smaller slice of Metro Detroit while the entire region continues to be saddled with the image of Detroit. It's a lose-lose situation.
Top of pageBottom of page

Mw2gs
Member
Username: Mw2gs

Post Number: 180
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 68.252.3.47
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 3:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The entire region is saddled with the image of the State. Detroit is still and will always be the largest and signature city in the state. You hacks making a point that a county's population is catching up to a single city's population, only shows where you really stand. Oh well....carry on
Top of pageBottom of page

Mountainman
Member
Username: Mountainman

Post Number: 13
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 153.90.170.190
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 3:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Keep jacking up those gas prices, and maybe the sprawl might slow if not stop. Make the suburbanites pay for things they make Detroiters alone pay for. Like the DIA, the infrastructure to get to and from the sporting events, concerts, and work in the city. Maybe you might start reversing those numbers. They are sad to me. Increbibly. Who in their right mind want to live in hillbilly county (aka Macomb)? All the concrete, none of th character. LRT (rail transit) might be a major answer to all of this.
Top of pageBottom of page

Spacemonkey
Member
Username: Spacemonkey

Post Number: 4
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 63.102.87.27
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 3:45 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"All the concrete, none of th character"

That's funny. Detroit IS all concrete. Moreso than the suburbs.

Character?

Um. Yeah.
Top of pageBottom of page

Millingtond
Member
Username: Millingtond

Post Number: 6
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 69.128.233.36
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 6:13 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hmm I drive 150 miles a day to work I live 95 Miles from Detroit and I don't miss all the concrete noise or character (crime) of the city. I like my dirt roads, Small town, Cows in the field across from me and I drive into the city daily. So your moronic approach to rasing the price of gas to stop sprawl well most of us who "sprawled" have this option called a transfer. I can put in a form to move to Saginaw 26 miles or Flint 22 miles and not drive into Detroit at all. Makes no difference to you if I spend my money in the City of Detroit or Flint. By the way the majority of higher paying jobs in the city of Detroit have suburban offices to transfer to.

(Message edited by MillingtonD on April 12, 2006)
Top of pageBottom of page

Deputy
Member
Username: Deputy

Post Number: 89
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 63.115.132.100
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 7:40 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mountainman,
C'mon...there are many reasons one would want to live in Macomb County. First, look at the property tax rates, they are low....extremely low compared to the city. Second, those with children want them to go to quality schools, not many would say the city schools are quality. Also, suburbanites pay plenty for infrastructure, more money comes from the burbs to pay for roads, water and sewers, etc. than from the city.
I would love to move into the city, but with the outrageous tax rates, insurance rates, lack of services, lack of quality schools, there are just too many barriers. If we expect people to move into the city then we should make the city living attractive and economically competitive with the suburban option.
Top of pageBottom of page

Jsmyers
Member
Username: Jsmyers

Post Number: 1599
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 209.131.7.68
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 8:08 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Cows in the field across from me



I laugh my ass off everytime I hear about somebody paying extra for this. It is not the cows. I love cows. I wish my grandfather still had them.

It is the fact that people pay extra for something that their very precense will destroy. The farmer (or owner of the beautiful forest) will see to a developer and what are you left with? The same suburban crap and longer commute.

And Millingtond, I'm not talking about you as an individual. I know nothing about you, you might be the wife of the farmer for all I know. I was just commenting about the general population.

And when oil hits $100/bbl and everyone wants a transfer, there will be no transfer. Just a horribly ineffiecient state with a lot of people that can't afford to get to work. Unless we can get rolling on that transit Mountainman writes of.

The exurbs in Northern Oakland and Macomb or Western Wayne county are not paying their share of the cost of the infrastructure they require. Unfortunately, it is the inner suburbs RO, Ferndale, Dearborn, Roseville, ect that are really getting screwed.
Top of pageBottom of page

Livernoisyard
Member
Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 418
Registered: 10-2004
Posted From: 69.242.223.42
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 8:28 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have friends are relatives living in western WC, southern OC or MC who almost never come into the city of Detroit. They don't work there and obviously wouldn't shop there because Detroit doesn't have many businesses other than party stores, store-front "churches", hairdresser and nail shops, and beauty-parlor supply outlets.

Even Detroiters have to travel to the burbs for any meaningful shopping or employment. Those living in the exoburbs are similar to Detroiters in that respect. So why not simply state that Detroiters are not paying their share?
Top of pageBottom of page

Jsmyers
Member
Username: Jsmyers

Post Number: 1602
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 209.131.7.68
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 8:36 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Even Detroiters have to travel to the burbs for any meaningful shopping or employment. Those living in the exoburbs are similar to Detroiters in that respect. So why not simply state that Detroiters are not paying their share?



????
How do you add 2 + 2 and get blue?
Top of pageBottom of page

Llyn
Member
Username: Llyn

Post Number: 1497
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 68.61.197.206
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 9:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Alright, let's play who pays for what...

DIA - The Founder's Society, and I think the state still kicks in a little. I'm not sure Detroit pays for anything there anymore - they just "own" it. If they contribute anything, it's very little. Meanwhile donors, many of whom are suburbanites, are giving 140 million for improvements and endowment to the DIA. Detroiters pay little, if anything for the DIA.

Infrastructure - if we're talking about freeways, which seems to be the thrust here, then everyone pays. The city of Detroit doesn't pay for "their" interstates and the suburbs don't pay for "theirs",

On the other hand, city streets, water (except main trunk lines I would assume), and sewer are in fact paid for by the local municipality.

Mountainman and Deputy, you need to reverse your opinions and each take the other side when it comes to who pays for what.
:-)

Ahem *clears throat* where have you people been all your lives?

Who pays for mass transit? No one does, and everyone suffers. That includes you suburbanites in both tangible and intangible ways.

Gotta go with mountainman on "all of the concrete and none of the character". Priceless. Unless you're living in Montana or the Maine coast or whatever, you're not really living in someplace scenic and/or wild. McComb county with it's expanding population is the country? Get real.
Top of pageBottom of page

Jsmyers
Member
Username: Jsmyers

Post Number: 1603
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 209.131.7.68
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 9:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Remember that those thing Detoit owns are things that the city sunk a lot of capital into. In some ways that is like paying off your mortgage and not being able to keep your neighbors from sleeping on your porch.
Top of pageBottom of page

Llyn
Member
Username: Llyn

Post Number: 1498
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 68.61.197.206
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 9:14 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

JS, that is very true.

I think there should be some balance to the discussion and the support of others outside the city should be respected and noted. I get tired of the "people are trying to steal Detroit's Jewels" lingo, is all.
Top of pageBottom of page

Jsmyers
Member
Username: Jsmyers

Post Number: 1604
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 209.131.7.68
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 9:19 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don't get me wrong. They should be regionally controlled and financed. And I think the time has long passed to consider getting money from other parts of the region.

It is just one solid way that the "suburbs have been dumping money into Detroit for years" aurguement is full of crap.
Top of pageBottom of page

Mountainman
Member
Username: Mountainman

Post Number: 14
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 69.144.194.110
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 10:52 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Let's face it. Without those cows or farms, there would be no city. Without the city there would be suburbs. With the suburbs there is less and less cows and farms. This seems to a problematice equation. Especially for sprawling suburbs of Detroit.
As for as infrastructure goes. Its quite obvious who pays for the freeways. But they get you to the roads (paid for by the city and its residents) that get you to the game. Without them, you might be walking quite a bit. The DPD are the ones who provide security and traffic control. The city also pays for the traffic lights, and the necessary services for parking to attend these games and events. Residents also pay for the water that you may consume during the course of your stay, as well as the garbage you leave. But, on the up side, Illitch makes you pay for the gravel parking lots.
Meaningful shopping!? Well that's an absurd statement. We're talking about private companies, and lord knows getting them to support any economicly depressed community, let alone one that happens to be a racial minority, is a kin to pulling teeth from an angry wolverine. Good Luck. Detroiters are more often than not paying for their fair. I'm sure you're more likely to find poor urbanites working those low paying positions so the wealthier suburbanites can buy all their pretty things.
As far the discussion over costs for living in either the city or the burbs, well there is both an economic cost and social cost. In the end the social cost can clearly affect the economic cost. Why must the freeways be so heavily subsidized? Why not rail lines, that move people and goods much more efficently.
As for the schools issue. Well, schools can clearly be a community based initiative. Because you, your parents, or their parents decided to cut and run from school system that had problems (small at one time), does not mean that Detroit schools are doomed to failure. We do live a democratic society in which we as residents have a choice as to how a system is run. Throwing you hands up in the air, and declaring "That S%$t is broken", isn't the way to affect any positive change. Millingtond, Llyn, and Deputy you answers are old, tired, and full of the regular bias and ignorance that have created problems Detroit now has today.
Top of pageBottom of page

Llyn
Member
Username: Llyn

Post Number: 1502
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 68.61.197.206
Posted on Thursday, April 13, 2006 - 10:32 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

MM

Respectfully, I didn't give an annswer.
Top of pageBottom of page

Eastsidedog
Member
Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 235
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 12.47.224.7
Posted on Thursday, April 13, 2006 - 6:32 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It seems more and more that 20 years from now we will have a reverse donut effect, a repopulated core, depopulated bedroom community suburbs, and booming bedroom community/office park exurbs. Wow that'll be really wierd like a wall between exurbia and the urban core.

BTW, I like the concrete in the city. It's warmer in the winter. :-)
Top of pageBottom of page

Lmichigan
Member
Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 3522
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.172.95.197
Posted on Thursday, April 13, 2006 - 8:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think something elese that needs to be added to this is that SEMCOG, for the first time, is using adjustments using U.S. Census county estimates which is why you see such a huge "drop" from just last month for Detroit and Wayne County, in particular. I'm not sure how much more accurate that is, if at all. For instance, Detroit is said to be at 872,322 this month, but before the adjustments was said to be 886,311 last month. I'm not sure what to believe anymore beyound the fact that it is clear that outside of the inner city neighborhoods it appears that people are fleeing the city even faster than in the 1990's even with the cry of "revitalization" in the air.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.