Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 Americans Flee Cities For Cheap Homes, Open Spaces Previous Next
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Thecarl
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Username: Thecarl

Post Number: 711
Registered: 04-2005
Posted From: 69.14.30.175
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 11:52 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Americans are leaving the nation's big cities in search of cheaper homes and open spaces farther out.

Nearly every large metropolitan area had more people move out than move in from 2000 to 2004, with a few exceptions in the South and Southwest, according to a report being released Thursday by the Census Bureau.

Northeasterners are moving South and West. West Coast residents are moving inland. Midwesterners are chasing better job markets. And just about everywhere, people are escaping to the outer suburbs, also known as exurbs.

"It's a case of middle class flight, a flight for housing affordability," said William Frey, a demographer at the Brookings Institution, a Washington think tank. "But it's not just white middle class flight, it's Hispanics and blacks, too."

The Census Bureau measured domestic migration - people moving within the United States - from 1990 to 2000, and from 2000 to 2004. The report provides the number of people moving into and out of each state and the 25 largest metropolitan areas.

The states that attracted the most new residents: Florida, Arizona and Nevada. The states that lost the most: New York, California and Illinois.

Among the 25 largest metropolitan areas, 18 had more people move out than move in from 2000 to 2004. New York, Los Angeles and Chicago -- the three biggest metropolitan areas -- lost the most residents to domestic moves. The New York metropolitan area had a net loss of more than 210,000 residents a year from 2000 to 2004.

more at http://www.clickondetroit.com/ money/8851489/detail.html
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Goat
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Username: Goat

Post Number: 8341
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.71.59.252
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 1:04 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Baby boomers looking to get out of the rat race while Gen X'ers are coming back.

This is just the same old, same old whereas each generation does the opposite of their parents.
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Lilpup
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Username: Lilpup

Post Number: 945
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 69.129.146.186
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 1:11 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's the list the AP had
negative numbers indicate losses

Check out San Francisco - could that be a typo for 2000-2004?

Metropolitan Area 1990 to 2000 2000 to 2004

Atlanta 58,131 31,026

Baltimore -5,292 -222

Boston -20,356 -41,851

Chicago -57,216 -63,249

Cincinnati 2,586 -2,239

Cleveland -11,643 -12,306

Dallas-Fort Worth 25,450 17,119

Denver 19,203 -3,103

Detroit -24,466 -26,696

Houston 10,058 12,212

Los Angeles -180,025 -117,780

Miami 2,768 -5,745

Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn. 7,609 -3,053

New York -190,939 -211,014

Philadelphia -27,739 -8,647

Phoenix 42,832 48,598

Pittsburgh -8,840 -5,720

Portland, Ore. 17,388 8,350

Riverside, Calif. 18,981 81,460

San Diego -13,766 -14,797

San Francisco -21,587 -60,984

Seattle 9,147 -7,793

St. Louis -6,730 -2,966

Tampa-St. Petersburg, Fla. 17,645 36,395

Washington -12,386 -4,124

------

Source: Census Bureau
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Track75
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Username: Track75

Post Number: 2319
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 12.75.19.57
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 1:45 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

SF 2000 - 2004 ===> dotcom/tech crash.
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Andylinn
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Username: Andylinn

Post Number: 19
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 68.40.195.233
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 2:13 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

the move to the exurbs disturbs me, because it's subsidized by established communities... we detroiters/ferndalians/whateve r are paying to set up new roads/electrical systems/water pipes... and we're paying ALOT of money... to make OUR community worse... this doesn't please me at all. I can work with the suburbs, and I think we should... but the exurbs MUST go. I have no use for them...
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Ndavies
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Username: Ndavies

Post Number: 1745
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 129.9.163.233
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 4:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Isn't this more a result of families getting smaller than people actually moving out? The number of people per houshold has been dropping for the last 50 years. Many more unmarried singles, Dinks and single kid families than there were when I was young.
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 259
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 69.220.142.7
Posted on Thursday, April 20, 2006 - 6:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Isn't this more a result of families getting smaller than people actually moving out? The number of people per houshold has been dropping for the last 50 years. Many more unmarried singles, Dinks and single kid families than there were when I was young.



Ndavies, in many other metros, YES, urban households are shrinking. But in Detroit there's still way more households leaving than moving in.

I find Exurbia highly disturbing for the same reasons Andylinn does. Hopefully it will slow down, but it likely will not stop any time soon. Granholm's fix it first policy for roads is a start to slowing sprawl down. The city also needs to stop piping water out to the new growth areas. Let the developers build their own water system and their own roads and their own schools if they want to build on the fringe. As I've repeated many times, without population growth, urban sprawl is just reckless, destructive growth. We're just decreasing the overall density of the metro area which is horribly inefficient.

Interesting note about SF. Man the crash hit hard there.

Actually, regarding DINKs and single child families, Ndavies most of my friends are only children or one of two. Us Gen Xers were born in the middle of a recession (mid/late 70's). I think that may be part of the reason why folks are having less kids now (at least in MI).
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Detroitplanner
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Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 4
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 152.163.100.8
Posted on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 1:57 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This stuff has been going on since the begining of civilization. Growing cities is nothing new. What is new are the complicated transportation systems that can move tons of people and good thoughout the city and connecting to others.

Here are the fundemental problems:
1) Taxes are cheap in townships especially rural townships.

2) People have an independant source of travel, the automobile. It is clear that in this area that this is king, with 97 percent of all trips taken using this mode. Next comes walking at two percent, finally transit at one.

3) Detroit does not offer anything to most people who live in the suburbs. Most who live out there, work out there, most hate to pay taxes, they can rationalize, "I can come to Detroit, use the people mover they (Detroiters) subsidize, see the redwings, lions, or tigers play in places they subsidize, pee on buildings without getting hassled, break into old buildings, bust some windows, rip the hell out of the riverwalk with my skateboard, and not get into trouble. Why should I pay extra taxes and insurance, when I can do all that stuff anyways? Remember, folks in Ferndale, the Pointes, Warren, many downriver suburbs, all live closer to downtown than those living out in Old Redford. They have the same geographic access to the city, and they don't pay for it.

Detroit needs to come up with things they can provide that are better than the suburbs. Look at all of those folks paying a pittance in property taxes for their stylish new digs. They get it. They vote with their pocketbook the same way those who come into the city and use everything and don't pay for it do. It makes sense for them to live in the City.

I do however take offense to the guy with the $20,000 fish tanks paying less in taxes than I do, having grown up in the city, bought a home in the city, and working to improve it.

Detroit needs to get its schools into shape. It needs more neighborhood attractions (parks, places to hang out or buy stuff). The majority of the City residents do not live within 4 miles of downtown. They need walkable areas, they need to feel safe again.

Detroit needs a bold leader. It needs a Martin Luther King or a Winston Churchill. It does not need to waste so much time bickering about what others have on their plate while we have got steak. Only problem with our steak is that there is no sizzle to it.

We need to reflect on the positive momentum as well. We need to remember what Detroit was like not only 40 years ago, but 10, 5 years ago. We have to measure our successes against a baseline that is realistic, and that would be ten years ago. yes we have lots of new stores thoughout the city, this is a plus. However, we have crappy garbage pick-up and no one enforcing ordinances. We have a lot of new homes, and new jobs downtown. Some of these jobs are the result od musical buildings, leaving the old state buildings empty, but some like Compuware are new, and a real feather. We have more places to eat then ten years ago, with a much better selection. We are honoring our own heritiage with statues of Cadillac, escaping slaves, and the union. We have expanding art and science museums, but closed zoos and aquariums. Hudson's, for some a symbol of past glory is now gone; a building so huge that cutting it into lofts would result into 1,000 square foot units that are 10 feet wide and 100 feet long, with maybe one or two windows tops. However, we now have hope that we can get a piece of the Rock to land on the structure and help with the new downtown.

We also have a better waterfront than we did. We can thanks Coleman, Dennis, Kwame, Jennifer, and even Big John for all contributing to this. It takes time, it take team building it takes collaboration, oh, and it also takes General Motors to finally turn that pigs ear of a building into a silk purse and want to link it into the waterfont and the rest of downtown. Bravo GM.

Finally we don't have NBD anymore, but we have Chase and they are handing out free ice cream. As a boy I'd take the bus to flag day with my mom, brother and sister, and Vernors would be in Kennedy Square handing out free ice cream. That was 30 years ago and getting that was something so special I still remember it. Now I work toil downtown working long hours in hopes I can revive the old girl. On Monday I'm going to get free ice cream again at that same spot. Its now Campus Martius and Vernors has been replaced by Mickey Mouse, but the ice cream is free, ane I will have one and celebrate all that is good, and all that still need to be done in Detroit.
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Detroitplanner
Member
Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 5
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 152.163.100.8
Posted on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 2:03 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

what the heck is a feather? sorry folks I'm new at this, and it is late. I need to lean to edit BEFORE posting!

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