Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 Residents wary of region's future. Previous Next
Top of pageBottom of page

Darwinism
Member
Username: Darwinism

Post Number: 484
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 69.221.3.73
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 1:04 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pb cs.dll/article?AID=/20060423/O PINION03/604230346/1271

More population loss ? Please ..... somebody ..... stop the exodus.
Top of pageBottom of page

Bob
Member
Username: Bob

Post Number: 935
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 205.188.116.137
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 1:21 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The exodus will stop when the jobs come back....plain and simple. People say this is a great place to live, but due to the economy, job losses, and Metro Detroit's reliance on the auto industry, people do not see any choice but to leave to where there are jobs. How to bring the jobs back is the million dollar question that we have debated lots on many threads here. I don't think any one person has all the answers, but we all need to get on board as a region and fix this problem, just like Edsel Ford said in the article.
Top of pageBottom of page

Lilpup
Member
Username: Lilpup

Post Number: 951
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 1:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Metro Detroit's reliance on the auto industry"

The need to rediversify Detroit business is paramount.

Are there any programs out there tailored to help the smaller existing auto industry suppliers convert to other products and industries? It's not like a drop in demand for stoves is what caused Detroit stove manufacturers to disappear.
Top of pageBottom of page

Ron
Member
Username: Ron

Post Number: 57
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 66.174.79.233
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 2:13 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bob, I agree. Does anyone involved in the private sector (preferably someone involved in emerging technologies/industries)(and preferably someone in a decision-making position) know the specific factors that business looks at when deciding where to locate? Is it an issue of chance, such as where you are from (Wasn't Ford originally from Detroit?), or is it an issue of a geographic area having the requisite natural resources, or is it the "business climate?"

Why did the dot.com/high-tech industry settle in the Bay area?

I have a hunch that it is a variety of factors, some of it based on chance, some not. But one of the factors that is probably an issue is quality of life-type issues. If so, then we are in trouble. Why would an outside company look to locate in SE MI, provided the type of issues we have here? (Again, if this is one of the factors that they look at).

It is kind of like the chicken and egg: we have to improve on the regional issues in order to attract jobs; but we need jobs in order to improve on our regional issues.

One thing, however, is certain: we must start right now, on an individual level, improving upon the perception of Detroit by outsiders. For instance, when I travel and tell people I'm from Detroit, they always take two steps back, and ask something stupid, like: "How many shootouts have you seen?" While I may have seen one or two in my time, I'm not going to tell them that; it would simply reinforce their pre-conceived, negative impression of Detroit. This is something we all can do now, on an individual basis.

Lilpup, I don't know of any programs like that, but I'm sure something must exist. I think part of the problem is that no one knows what the new industry will be. If we have manufacturers simply change what they are manufacturing, will this help? Or do we need to diversify into non-manufacturing industries? I certainly don't have the answers.
Top of pageBottom of page

Ltorivia485
Member
Username: Ltorivia485

Post Number: 2598
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 199.74.87.98
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 2:21 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It doesn't help that Detroit is one of the poorest cities in the country. It also doesn't help that Detroit has a bad "crime" reputation. It's not safe (nor wise) to relocate business here if the population as a whole is illiterate and undereducated.
Top of pageBottom of page

56packman
Member
Username: 56packman

Post Number: 216
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 24.208.234.52
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 2:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The tool and die and small OE part manufacturers have the same problem making parts for___________ that they have being an automotive supplier. Overseas (asian) competitors labor costs are a fraction of what they are here,there is no pesky EPA "getting in your busness" there, and skilled labor isn't getting any easier to hire/train . It's rough for the manufacturing sector, they don't have many friends these days.
Top of pageBottom of page

Danny
Member
Username: Danny

Post Number: 4017
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 198.111.165.162
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 4:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

More jobs means more boomtown population. Detroit did it before in the 1910 and it will do it again in 2010.
Top of pageBottom of page

Livernoisyard
Member
Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 504
Registered: 10-2004
Posted From: 69.242.223.42
Posted on Sunday, April 23, 2006 - 7:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In 1910, it made perfect sense to locate factories in the larger cities. People didn't own cars then, and the roads were dirt (including mud), gravel, cinders, bricks, and very little pavement--which was often cheaply built macadam. Even in Detroit, the suburbs of Highland Park and Dearborn were already "sprawling" before 1925.

It doesn't make much sense to locate factories in a city anymore. NIMBY is still one obstacle; cleaning up the pollution from former factories could also cost millions sometimes, just for one small site. Notice that the new car plants for Toyota, Hyundai, and Honda avoided locating in or near larger communities in the South.

The "build it and they will come" seems to work for the factories attracting the people. Investors who own and locate factories are clever. They would literally try to get a community to build their plants for them and give them tax abatements, if they can get away with that. Let's see what Detroit bribes Rock with...

Detroit just doesn't have the means to pull it off--attracting business. It's a beggar and beggars don't call many shots.

(Message edited by LivernoisYard on April 23, 2006)
Top of pageBottom of page

Danny
Member
Username: Danny

Post Number: 4021
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 141.217.174.229
Posted on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 9:22 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Then I'm going to call some Centuarians from the planet Centurus at the Alpha Centuari Tri-Solar System for some help of brining their colony to Detroit here in planet Earth so they boost our ecomony with their powerful socialist religious union workers.

Where did I hid that interndimentional portal device That I made contact with them 15 years ago?
Top of pageBottom of page

Meadows
Member
Username: Meadows

Post Number: 46
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 67.77.203.20
Posted on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 1:54 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

For instance, when I travel and tell people I'm from Detroit, they always take two steps back, and ask something stupid, like: "How many shootouts have you seen?" While I may have seen one or two in my time, I'm not going to tell them that; it would simply reinforce their pre-conceived, negative impression of Detroit.




So the solution to erasing people's negative impressions of Detroit is for Detroiters to lie to their face?
Top of pageBottom of page

Ron
Member
Username: Ron

Post Number: 59
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 66.174.92.166
Posted on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 2:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is not an issue of lying. It is an issue of damage control. I don't know if you have ever heard the adage that "what happens in the family stays in the family." Basically, while we may have our problems in the Detroit region, it is not as bad a place to live as many outsiders think, and at any rate, it is not for them to be concerned about unless they will do something to assist us in repairing our image.

What I prefer to do is highlight the positive things about the city, rather than focus on one or two bad experiences that only serves to reinforce others' pre-conceptions. So, while you may see it as lying, I see it as focusing their attention on our strengths rather than our weaknesses.
Top of pageBottom of page

Meadows
Member
Username: Meadows

Post Number: 47
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 67.77.253.114
Posted on Monday, April 24, 2006 - 4:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So a person isn't entitled to ask a question "unless they will do something to assist us in repairing our image"? Interesting.

At any rate, I certainly understand accentuating the positives. However, if someone asks you a question and you respond with something other the truth, then yes I see that as lying regardless of the good reason. IMHO, it'd be more diplomatic to decline to answer and/or change the subject.

Add Your Message Here
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.