Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 Detroit: Status symbol no-more Previous Next
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Mike
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Username: Mike

Post Number: 610
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 66.227.165.194
Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 8:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://yahoo.businessweek.com/ autos/content/may2006/bw200605 25_134613.htm

Good read, "what have you done for me lately"
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Ray1936
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Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 591
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Thursday, May 25, 2006 - 11:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Writer Ed Wallace hits on a point that brings back memories, being among the old farts of posters on DetroitYES. Starting in the late forties, each new car year brought huge excitement. What would the new models look like? What features would they have? Styling was the main thing, coming off of the dinosaur tanks of the late 30s and post war 40s. The 1949 Ford was radically different from the '48, and most of the big 3 bragged of their styling.

That mindset lasted all through the fifties. Around the early sixties, the "thrill was gone" for the most part. Probably the only biggie in the sixties was Lee Iacocca's Mustang and some of the Pontiac models. But from, oh, 1965 on, new model introductions had become pretty much a ho-hum thing.

Then, of course, in the seventies the big three made a lot of sub-quality vehicles and they laughed at the introduction of the cars from the Land of the Rising Sun. Two big mistakes.

But the fifties were great. Had a '51 Ford tudor, a '55 Ford convertible, then got married and got a '58 Ford Station Wagon. Loved each one of those, more so than any car that I've had since.

I'm rambling. But I'm old. Ignore me. :-)
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Ray
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Username: Ray

Post Number: 702
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 68.42.220.37
Posted on Friday, May 26, 2006 - 12:41 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Very interesting.
So, we have 4.5 million people, a border, a signficant global industry (whether or not a status symbol), a lot of engineering talent, a ton infrastructure including one slightly used downtown with a lot of potential.

What do we do?

This city is like the ultimate Harvard Business School case study.
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Danny
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Username: Danny

Post Number: 4189
Registered: 02-2004
Posted From: 141.217.173.151
Posted on Friday, May 26, 2006 - 8:44 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

GM may lost it status, but its stocks are now worth $1.39 a share.
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Focusonthed
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Username: Focusonthed

Post Number: 183
Registered: 02-2006
Posted From: 209.220.229.254
Posted on Friday, May 26, 2006 - 10:48 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

...OR $27.90 as of yesterday
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Jsmyers
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Username: Jsmyers

Post Number: 1729
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 209.131.7.68
Posted on Friday, May 26, 2006 - 11:16 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Finally read the whole thing.

Great article. The word he didn't use is commodity.

Most cars have become commodities, which is why they either have to made with as little labor input (money wise) as possible.

I bet that this is the one thing that few in the big three ever thought could happen 40 years ago.

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