Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 Passport plan to keep Canadians at home Previous Next
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 390
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 9:49 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

50% of Canadians polled said they will make fewer trips to the United States or stop going across the border all together if the US implements its passport plan.

I wonder what percentage of the Metro Detroit economy is made up of the products purchased and services used by Canadians? It looks like that portion of the economy is going to be cut in half.



ID plan to keep Canadians home

Windsor Star
Published: Monday, May 29, 2006

One-half of Canadians would either travel less to the United States or never go again if the Americans made it mandatory to show a passport or other identification at the border, a new poll suggests.

The Leger Marketing survey indicated 33 per cent of Canadians would go south less often, while 17 per cent would no longer go at all and 39 per cent would go just as often.

The poll of 1,500 Canadians was conducted May 16-21 and distributed to The Canadian Press.

It is considered accurate within 2.6 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

The U.S. government originally planned to require all travellers by sea or air to provide a passport or new high-tech identification cards at the end of this year, and for land crossings by the end of 2007.

But on May 17, the U.S. Senate voted to push back the Jan. 1, 2008, deadline.

Under an amendment that still has to pass the House of Representatives and receive presidential approval to become law, the deadline would be extended to June 1, 2009.

Ken Oplinger, president of the Bellingham Chamber of Commerce in the state of Washington, says the tougher measures would hurt not only tourism, but also trade, especially at major crossings in Buffalo and Detroit.

"In both places, when cars back up for a significant period of time at those bridges across the border, the trucks get caught as well," Oplinger said in an interview.

"If we have cars backed up because there are delays at the border with people who don't have proper ID, trade is going to take a hit as well."

The Windsor Star 2006
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Goat
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Username: Goat

Post Number: 8500
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.71.57.39
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:29 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Keep those damn Canadiens home!
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 767
Registered: 10-2004
Posted From: 69.242.223.42
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:34 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I doubt that requiring passports would deter Mexicans, especially illegal aliens.
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Aiw
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Username: Aiw

Post Number: 5568
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 209.216.150.127
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:38 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The worst part about the plan is that it is very isolationist.

The plan IMO isn't to keep Canadians or Mexicans out, but rather to keep Americans at home, and to discourage international travel. I read somewhere that less than 20% of Americans even have a passport.
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Smogboy
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Username: Smogboy

Post Number: 2791
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 69.47.100.44
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:39 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Would Detroiters feel any less about going to Canada if they had to pony up for a passport to visit Canada??
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 391
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:59 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Certainly, Detroiters will be less likely to go to Canada if a passport is required. At this point Canada has not announced whether a passport will be required to enter Canada, however US citizens will need a passport to re-enter the US. This is an American law -- the law in Canada has not been changed.

Hopefully the war on terrorism will not turn into a war on tourism....
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Naturalsister
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Username: Naturalsister

Post Number: 671
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.30.158.46
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:05 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This would certainly have an adverse affect on tourism. A large demographic of this region would find passports costly and bothersome to obtain.

On both sides of the border.

later - naturalsister
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Smogboy
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Username: Smogboy

Post Number: 2794
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 69.47.100.44
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:07 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OOoooo man, I can see how many folks are gonna be up in arms when they go OVER to Windsor from here, whether it's the casino, the strip clubs, the weekend jaunt to Toronto or whatever and then get smacked around at their own border for not having a passport. How many Americans even know about the re-entry law??

I've had my passport for years and have always kept it with me when going to Canada even though all I've had to use was the barest pieces of ID. I wonder how many of the supposed 80% of Americans (going off of Aiw's stats above) who don't have a passport will pony up the cash to go get one now just to go to our friendly neighbors' land.
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Naturalsister
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Username: Naturalsister

Post Number: 673
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 68.30.158.46
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:17 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had a passport since I was 11 (40 on New Years Eve this year) and I can count on one hand how many of my friends and associates also have them.

The bulk of the people I'm talking about are college-educated, homeowners, auto leasees, white and blue collar people who are very likely the ones pouring dollars into the local economy on many different levels.

For some reason, having a passport is not the mindset that I run across on the regular.

later - naturalsister
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Warriorfan
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Username: Warriorfan

Post Number: 378
Registered: 08-2005
Posted From: 68.43.81.191
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:26 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is it that much of an effort to get a passport? I think it took me all of 15 minutes at the Post Office to fill out the form and get my picture taken (they can do that for you at the post office now). A few weeks later your passport will arrive by mail. I wasn't even planning on leaving the country when I got mine, I just wanted one so that I would have it in case I ever needed it.

Let's be honest, the most impoverished people in the Metro Detroit area probably aren't taking trips to Canada. The Americans crossing the border are heading to the casino or the bars/clubs or for some other form of entertainment. These people can afford passports, I'm willing to bet that the vast majority of Americans crossing the border can afford a passport but will bitch about it because they are too lazy to go get one.
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Pacypacy_
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Username: Pacypacy_

Post Number: 56
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 24.192.166.67
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:35 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Fine and dandy. Keep those funny coins on the other side of the boarder. I bet the Red Wings wish that the Edmonton Oilers would have stayed home. :-)
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Aiw
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Username: Aiw

Post Number: 5569
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 209.216.150.127
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 11:48 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

These figures are from 2003, but I doubt that much has changed:

http://www.gyford.com/phil/wri ting/2003/01/31/how_many_ameri ca.php
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Fnemecek
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Username: Fnemecek

Post Number: 1690
Registered: 12-2004
Posted From: 69.212.51.175
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 12:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Hopefully the war on terrorism will not turn into a war on tourism....



Requiring folks to show a valid passport is hardly a "war on tourism". It takes about 15 minutes to fill out an application for a passport and only a couple of seconds to show it to the guy at the border.

A "war" requires just a wee bit more than that.
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Lilpup
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Username: Lilpup

Post Number: 1058
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 69.130.18.100
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 12:12 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My sister-in-law's parents were from Canada. She has many relatives still in Ontario, where they even hold a family reunion every year. But now my brother would have to pony up $522 for six passports to take the kids along (and kids' passports are only good for five years).

Once again screwed by stupid, biased Federal policy.
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 392
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 12:24 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Fnemecek, apparently you do not enjoy a good pun.

It only takes 15 minutes to fill out an application if you have all the necessary documentation handy. How many Americans/Canadians (outside Windsor/Detroit) keep their birth certificates handy?

My mother, a Canadian by birth and an American by blood, has been working on her US passport application for several months now. Since she was born in Canada, she needs to obtain my grandfather's birth certificate from Detroit, a copy of my parents marriage records from Windsor, a copy of her own long form certified birth certificate from Toronto, and have my grandfather swear an affidavit that must be drafted and notarized. Oh, and she has to spend 15 minutes filling out her passport application.

Right now, for a family of 4 from Windsor to go to a Tigers game they need to pay for:
- price of tickets
- parking or tunnel bus fare
- price of snacks, etc. at the game
As of 2008, you can tack on $400 for passports and $70 for passport photos. Guess who is driving to Toronto?

(Message edited by upinottawa on May 29, 2006)
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Sknutson
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Username: Sknutson

Post Number: 586
Registered: 03-2004
Posted From: 64.139.1.36
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 1:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'd feel so much more secure, being better protected from those Canadian terrorists.
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Detourdetroit
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Username: Detourdetroit

Post Number: 211
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 70.236.145.157
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 1:22 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We went to Canada for the weekend. Toronto was amazing and doing so many things we should be doing here in D-Land. But I won't rant about that...

What made us extra sad to be Americans was the border experience. While I understand at least the rhetoric of the "War on Terror" spiel and the idea that our borders must be secure, and therefore filled with overly stern, badass customs agents, blah blah, would it absolutely kill them to smile and say "Welcome Home..." (after giving up our passports and birth certs, and seeing in plain sight that we don't fit a racist profile)???

The difference between going and coming is palpable and somewhat depressing...
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 3808
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 24.11.154.56
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 4:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The whole "It only takes 15 minutes" argument is a gross oversimplication, at best. This resurgence of nationalistic "Fortress America" is going to bite us in the ass...again.
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Cynknight
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Username: Cynknight

Post Number: 69
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 69.208.37.143
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 5:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Maybe the real battle in all this is to get the price of getting a passport reduced. For adults, at least it's good for ten years (I'm on my third passport which expires in two years).

If the cost of kids passports could be reduced (or eliminated), do you think that would be good enough? I personally have no problem affording a passport - but understand there are many who can't afford it.
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Ray1936
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Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 599
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 207.200.116.139
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 5:14 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As noted, getting a passport is no big thing, but our open border with Canada has been too long a tradition to change.

Watch for this plan to eventually end up in the Congress' shitcan. You heard it here first.

I can't imagine my yearly trip to Detroit without a slab of ribs from the Tunnel BBQ.
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Naturalsister
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Username: Naturalsister

Post Number: 675
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 70.8.73.2
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 5:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Right,

It's just not that simple, nor affordable for many.

later - naturalsister
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Johnnny5
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Username: Johnnny5

Post Number: 267
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 71.227.95.4
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 6:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I can see this law hurting Canadian border cities and businesses much more so than our own. Many places in Windsor rely on the large amount of Americans traveling there. Especially places like the casinos, bars, shops and restaurants. While some American business's will notice the difference, I don't see it affecting Detroit or Port Huron as badly. They both have a huge metro area to rely on for customers. Many of Canada's border cities are basically suburbs of their American neighbors, without the easy cross border traffic they will be in trouble.
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 2186
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 4.229.72.27
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 7:13 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

With the Candian dollar approaching the value of the American dollar, it will dampen future cross border bargain shoppers coming to the USA.
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S_marshall
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Username: S_marshall

Post Number: 36
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 70.28.83.215
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 8:27 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I only wish Canadian passports were good for 10 years. They're good for only five, and seem like they are more of a hassle to get here than they are in the US. I have one because I went to the UK two years ago, yet right now, I get waved right through US customs when driving over the Ambassador Bridge or Peace Bridge at Buffalo, even without checking ID. So much for security anyway.
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30th_street
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Username: 30th_street

Post Number: 24
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 205.188.116.137
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:12 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So the folks that are balking at obtaiing a passport, I suppose they also balk at $100 gym shoes, buying the next generation coolest ever than ever obsolete in 6 months video game system or maybe it will be the folks that would have to put on hold that cell phone they are going to buy their 9 year old. Just get the passport.
Why do they cost so much anyway?
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Lilpup
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Username: Lilpup

Post Number: 1059
Registered: 06-2004
Posted From: 69.130.18.100
Posted on Monday, May 29, 2006 - 10:49 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

FYI my brother's family has none of that - not even cable tv

my sister-in-law is one who daily tracks every penny they spend so they stay right side up
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Smogboy
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Username: Smogboy

Post Number: 2804
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 69.47.100.44
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 2:18 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Now here's a question for Americans & Canadians alike who cross the border on a semi-regular basis... where do you get hassled more? The US side or the Canadian side??

As it is now it seems I get hassled much more coming BACK home to the US. They know I've got US plates, a Michigan driver's licnese and all of the fancy paperwork that says I belong here and yet they still give me more grief. It makes me wonder whether the US even wants their own people back at times! If I were a Windsorite, would it even be worth my while to even come to the Detroit side if I was getting hassled that much?
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Deputy_mayor_2026
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Username: Deputy_mayor_2026

Post Number: 56
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 205.188.116.137
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 2:23 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What is the cost for an adult passport?
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Smogboy
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Username: Smogboy

Post Number: 2808
Registered: 11-2004
Posted From: 69.47.100.44
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 2:34 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here are the prices on obtaining passports...
http://travel.state.gov/passpo rt/get/fees/fees_837.html

They have different levels for obtaining new passports, renewing, and age categories.

I also know of services where they can obtain a legal passport for you immediately as well. They somehow have courier services and all sorts of safeguards but it's a small fortune depending on the amount of rush time you give them.
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Deputy_mayor_2026
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Username: Deputy_mayor_2026

Post Number: 57
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 205.188.116.137
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 2:36 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks.
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Aiw
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Username: Aiw

Post Number: 5571
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.71.64.28
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 7:10 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Smogboy, 100% more hassle on the US side.
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Compn
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Username: Compn

Post Number: 62
Registered: 04-2004
Posted From: 65.29.121.215
Posted on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 - 7:36 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

canadian passport fees: http://www.ppt.gc.ca/can/fees. aspx?lang=e

Document Adults Children
16 or over -- 3 to 15-- Under 3
24-page passport $87 $37 $22
48-page passport $92 $39 $24

only get hassled at usa side. canada side is 100x more inviting.

btw has anyone seen more canada plates since the dollar is getting near even exchange rate now? i havent noticed any upswing in ontario plates... maybe its a more popular shopping area in new york?

(Message edited by compn on May 30, 2006)
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Jerome81
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Username: Jerome81

Post Number: 1007
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 64.142.86.133
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 4:08 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think its silly. Won't change much for the better IMHO. Only make more hassle.

FYI the last 3 times I've been to canada over the past 3 years I haven't even been asked for my drivers license, much less my birth certificate. Every time its been "citizenship", "where you going","where you come from", "tobacco/alcohol/firearms", "good day".

If that's what most people's experiences are now, what good is a passport gonna do? None.

I don't really care either way. I don't have one now. They're kinda pricey but a good idea to have anyway. I should get one. I just don't think its necessary when going to or coming from Canada, and to be honest, I think it creates more of a friendly atmosphere and brotherhood between the nations. We are all a little Canadian and a little American.

And I can remember as just a wee kid (15 years ago) that the US border agents were always more business like and less friendly than the Canadians, and they asked more questions. I don't think anything has changed in as long as I can remember. My view, more people would rather sneak into the US illegally or to do harm than would go from the US into Canada. And if US border security elsewhere (such as the airports) is stiffer than Canadian border security, we're doing a lot of the screening for them in the first place. If a bit less friendly experience and more probing questions mean a criminal is stopped, I can deal with it.
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Cafe
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Username: Cafe

Post Number: 1260
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 84.162.60.80
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 6:54 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Y'all are funny. You need a passport to travel to any country. The EU has made it possible for citizens of the participating countries to freely move with in the EU countries, but that is fairly new. I miss the stamps. You still have to keep your passort on you when you are out of your own country. The US passport people are easy when compaired to the Moraccan passport authority. The U.S. is starting to require what the rest of the world has required for a long time. I guess we are catching up.
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Itsjeff
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Username: Itsjeff

Post Number: 5990
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 69.242.213.167
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 7:15 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If it would help keep AIW out, then I fully support mandatory passports. And blood tests.
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Ramcharger
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Username: Ramcharger

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 68.42.78.175
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 8:45 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"It takes about 15 minutes to fill out an application for a passport and only a couple of seconds to show it to the guy at the border."

The last time I returned from Canada I handed my passport to the border guard and he spent the next 10 minutes flipping through it, examining and questioning me about every visa and every overseas trip I've made over the last six years. If they do that to everybody, crossing the border will take hours.
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 395
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 9:39 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cafe, I would hardly say that the United States is catching up. The EU security perimeter approach is the way of the future. The current US/Canada non-passport entry was one of the most progressive border crossing systems in the world only to be passed by the EU several years ago.

Moving to a passport only entry between Canada and the United States is the opposite of what the two states should be doing. The United States and Canada should be developing a security perimeter approach that places increased scrutiny on those entering North American and reduces (to some degree) scrutiny on those who are validly in North America.

I think that enhanced driver's licences along the lines of the REAL ID Act that include place of birth would be a more than sufficient improvement on the current system. Most people carrying a driver's licence most of the time, few carry around their passports. Passport only entries will significantly reduce spontaneous trips across the border.
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 396
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 9:40 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Itsjeff, your plan won't work: Aiw has a passport - I remember that he went to Paris last year. :-)
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Itsjeff
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Username: Itsjeff

Post Number: 5993
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 208.27.111.125
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 9:42 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Curses.
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Aiw
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Username: Aiw

Post Number: 5574
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 64.228.198.239
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 5:28 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That's right, it's too late.... :-)

Also the problem with the US CBP agents is that they treat everyone as if you are a criminal. Endless questioning and hassles.

In the last year I have been though customs in England 3 times, France, Switzerland, Canada and the US. Guess which one of those is the biggest hassle to deal with?

Cafe you are too funny to say the US is "catching up". As some one who's inside the EU, you can honestly say that the USA's system is better?!?!?
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 399
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 5:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Last summer I visited France, Germany, Austria, and Italy. I went through customs once in Paris and again back in Montreal. During the second week of our trip we stayed in a Bavarian town about an hour south of Munich. We thought nothing of heading over to Innsbruck, Austria for lunch -- no customs, no delays, no hassles.

Now the US is planning to have Canadians carry passports to catch an afternoon ballgame in Detroit and planning to have Americans carry passports to go to Casino Windsor for a couple of hours.

Catching up? I'd suggest it is more like falling behind.
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Aiw
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Username: Aiw

Post Number: 5576
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 64.228.211.172
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 9:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

An interesting article in Maclean's this week, (For our American friends, Maclean's is the Canadian version of Time or Newsweek) about the border. I looked online, but the article isn't availabe.

In the article it claimed passport ownership levels of 24% for Americans vs. 40% for Canadians.
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 2214
Registered: 08-2004
Posted From: 4.229.105.86
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 9:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

US Customs folks have always been jerks, even before 9/11. And they're like that both at the airport and at the border crossings.

Are these folks naturally unpleasant, or do they take a class in it? What a way for first time foreign visitors to experience American hospitality.
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Blitz
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Username: Blitz

Post Number: 178
Registered: 09-2004
Posted From: 72.139.243.118
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 9:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

American customs officers go way overboard, I was just going to the Tigers game on Sunday and was harassed with a bunch of irrelevant questions, had to explain why I didn't have the tickets on me (was picking them up at will call), and then had to get my trunk searched.
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Upinottawa
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Username: Upinottawa

Post Number: 401
Registered: 09-2005
Posted From: 198.103.184.76
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 9:56 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Blitz, that's what happens when you avoid the tunnel bus. :-)

However, getting your car's trunk searched is better than getting your trunk searched when you get off the tunnel bus....
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Southwestmap
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Username: Southwestmap

Post Number: 483
Registered: 01-2005
Posted From: 64.79.90.206
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 10:09 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Customs Officer Green at the Bridge is really terrible: posturing, vaguely threatening people with his power, overly talkative and boastful when he does his inspection interviews. You should fear getting in his line because it's slower by half than the other lines. I once went in the office to complain about him. It was funny because I was so incensed at his behaviour that I never thought about how everyone in there would be cold and nasty to me. I do give the supervisor credit though. He was pleasant. But Green's cowboy antics continue.
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Blitz
Member
Username: Blitz

Post Number: 179
Registered: 09-2004
Posted From: 72.139.243.118
Posted on Thursday, June 01, 2006 - 10:37 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, this was actually my first time not taking the tunnel bus to a game (I avoided it because I knew it would be really crowded and hot).

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