Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2006 Younger folks like houses with character Previous Next
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Bvos
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Username: Bvos

Post Number: 1473
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 66.238.170.40
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 10:57 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

According to this Freep article, younger folks like houses with character.

As Gen Xers this is true for my wife and I. I know this applies to many on this board here. Sounds like it will be an interesting series (I'd say good, but little reporting from the Freep or Snews seems to cut it at the "good" category).

http://freep.com/apps/pbcs.dll /article?AID=/20060602/BUSINES S04/606020349
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The_aram
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Username: The_aram

Post Number: 4908
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 68.41.124.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 11:52 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

They also love empty lots they can buy on eBay.
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 454
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 11:58 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

They also like older houses over new houses but the building industry can't build those.
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Pffft
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Username: Pffft

Post Number: 988
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.34.51.20
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:17 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How is Generation X more "ethnically diverse" than other generations?

Scratching my head.
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Gravitymachine
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Username: Gravitymachine

Post Number: 1087
Registered: 05-2005
Posted From: 198.208.159.18
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:22 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

how about some of that "new urbanism" take place in an urban environment instead of a former corn field for a change.

build it in the city jerks!
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Atl_runner
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Username: Atl_runner

Post Number: 1915
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 198.151.12.10
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:24 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

For many of us, it's less about the size of the home and the land it sits on, and more about the architecture and unique features the home offers.




That's for you Ndavies.

I could have written that whole article. It pretty much validates everthing I know to be true in regards to homes and the wants and needs of many in my age range.
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 457
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:24 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Pffft, yeah I didn't get that one either. MAYBE you could say more "ethnically tolerant", maybe.

Of course they do say that white folks are becoming a smaller slice of the pie across America and will eventually be a minority.
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Mw2gs
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Username: Mw2gs

Post Number: 197
Registered: 03-2005
Posted From: 68.77.160.204
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:25 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Think Highland Park!!!!!!!!!!
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Commodore64
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Username: Commodore64

Post Number: 216
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 66.73.225.162
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Neotraditional (or Neo Urban) is ugly to me. Real homes are made with bricks. Who wants to paint that every 5 years?
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Bvos
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Username: Bvos

Post Number: 1480
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 66.238.170.40
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:29 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

New Urbanism uses brick.

A properly painted home only needs to be painted every 15-30 years.
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Atl_runner
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Username: Atl_runner

Post Number: 1916
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 198.151.12.10
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:30 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

neotraditional is made with brick as well. Just not the ones you see in the picture. It's not just about the look of the house, but of the feel of the whole neighboorhood in which it's being built.
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 458
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:33 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

For many of us, it's less about the size of the home and the land it sits on, and more about the architecture and unique features the home offers.



I'd say the land is pretty damn important (location, location, location). They should have said the AMOUNT of land that it sits on.

Alt_runner, seriously, I think that article is full of it. Young people want old houses in established areas. They do NOT want to live in anything new on the suburban fringe even 1%, (unless they are Republican).


quote:

how about some of that "new urbanism" take place in an urban environment instead of a former corn field for a change.

build it in the city jerks!



Gravitymachine, it's better that developers build dense and "urban" on the fringe that to build sprawling McMansions on 1/2 acre lots. I mean, come on. What if the Detroit suburbs had been built with New Urbanism in mind? We'd have a denser Metro more suited to mass transit and a host of other benefits. I applaud the developers for building dense, even if it's out on the fringe.
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Tayshaun22
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Username: Tayshaun22

Post Number: 205
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 69.14.101.116
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:41 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What's exactly wrong with a 1/2 acre lot? You've got to look at it from the other side. Maybe those parents want room for their kids to play catch, football, and other activities. Maybe they want some peace and quiet. You can't have that living in a DENSE city.
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Mackinaw
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Username: Mackinaw

Post Number: 1642
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 71.144.81.93
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:45 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You can always find inner-city areas with larger lots though. Most cities have something like Indian Village or Rosedale Park, but Detroit in general has a little more elbow room than east coast cities.
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Pffft
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Username: Pffft

Post Number: 989
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.34.51.20
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 12:47 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Eastside,

"Ethnically tolerant" -- yeah that would be more precise.
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 461
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:02 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Maybe those parents want room for their kids to play catch, football, and other activities. Maybe they want some peace and quiet. You can't have that living in a DENSE city.



Tayshaun22, Have you ever been to Belle Isle? or Central Park?

The difference is not the size of the play area. In fact large urban parks are certainly larger than any suburban yard. What you "can't have that living in a DENSE city" is total privacy and separation from your neighbors. That is the true goal of suburban spaces. To separate people from other people. To dissolve the sense of community and maximize the sense of privacy.
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Burnsie
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Username: Burnsie

Post Number: 433
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 35.12.20.66
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:05 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Commodore64 wrote, "Real homes are made with bricks."

Huh? So an 18th century Colonial house, a 19th century farmhouse and a 1920's bungalow aren't "real" because they have wooden siding?
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Mackinaw
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Username: Mackinaw

Post Number: 1646
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 71.144.81.93
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:08 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'd also like to give a plug to homes made out of stucco...
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Esd
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Username: Esd

Post Number: 22
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 160.109.103.190
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:17 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Eastsidedog, perhaps you will one day learn that not everyone chooses to live the "urban" lifestyle you seem so intent on cramming down everyone's throat and if people choose to live in the suburbs it's okay.
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Eric_c
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Username: Eric_c

Post Number: 762
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 68.76.202.10
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:20 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No, it's not!

You obviously need more cramming! :-)
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Esd
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Username: Esd

Post Number: 23
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 160.109.103.190
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:23 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Then bend over.
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Eric_c
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Username: Eric_c

Post Number: 763
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 68.76.202.10
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:31 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh, no.

You said "throat" the first time. You can't go back now.
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Lexdetroitman_07
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Username: Lexdetroitman_07

Post Number: 23
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 74.131.204.36
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As a member of generation Y, I like the design of newer housing projects inside city limits that have easy access to the CBD, as well as a good view of the city. The suburbs are nice, but the city would be a great place for me to live.

Lexdetroitman_07
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Danindc
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Username: Danindc

Post Number: 1508
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 67.100.158.10
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

What's exactly wrong with a 1/2 acre lot? You've got to look at it from the other side. Maybe those parents want room for their kids to play catch, football, and other activities. Maybe they want some peace and quiet. You can't have that living in a DENSE city.




Not true at all! A block from my house is a beautiful city park that takes up two entire city blocks. Never mind all the basketball courts, roller hockey rinks, baseball and football fields, and volleyball courts within walking distance. More yard than you could ever hope to buy in the burbs!

And aside from the occasional fire engine, it's pretty darn quiet too. My neighborhood is definitely quieter than that of my folks, who have an Interstate freeway in their backyard. I think some of the suburban xenophobes would be surprised at how quiet and private a patio or porch can be in the big bad evil dense city.

The difference is, many of the urbanites on this forum have lived in the suburbs at one point or another. How many of the suburban-"don't-cram-me-into-a -city"-ites have ever lived in the city?
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Esd
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Username: Esd

Post Number: 24
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 160.109.103.190
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:36 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

tease!
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Deputy_mayor_2026
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Username: Deputy_mayor_2026

Post Number: 61
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Aram can't let anything go, can he?
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The_aram
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Username: The_aram

Post Number: 4911
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 68.41.124.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 1:59 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Aram can't let anything go, can he?




Aren't you supposed to be in class right now?
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Deputy_mayor_2026
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Username: Deputy_mayor_2026

Post Number: 63
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:05 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey buddy, I am not in high school anymore. You can end all the bullshit about how I am some dumb kid.
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The_aram
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Username: The_aram

Post Number: 4912
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 68.41.124.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Where did I say you were dumb?
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Deputy_mayor_2026
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Username: Deputy_mayor_2026

Post Number: 65
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You inferred it.
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Susanarosa
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Username: Susanarosa

Post Number: 860
Registered: 11-2003
Posted From: 208.39.170.90
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:22 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Heya Deputy, Just cause you graduated from high school doesn't mean you're still not a kid to the rest of us.
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Deputy_mayor_2026
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Username: Deputy_mayor_2026

Post Number: 67
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:25 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't mind being a kid. I just don't like being treated like a dumb and naive kid. Sure the older Dyessers have more experience than I do, but they do not have to judge people on this board like MCM, Lex, and I just bcause we are younger.
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Fury13
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Username: Fury13

Post Number: 1095
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 69.222.11.226
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:25 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Deputymayor, I think you want to say: "You implied it." YOU, on the other hand, inferred a meaning from Aram's remarks.

Now THIS one frosts me:

"Ethnically tolerant" -- yeah that would be more precise.

That's such BS. The Boomer generation PIONEERED ethnic tolerance. It ORIGINATED with us, children.

(Damn, I am such an angry dog lately.)
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Pffft
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Username: Pffft

Post Number: 990
Registered: 12-2003
Posted From: 12.34.51.20
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:27 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Actually I agree with you, Fury...

I meant that phrase would be more precise in terms of what the writer was struggling to say.

I don't agree with what she was trying to say, it's typical Gen X pomposity, as if they invented racial tolerance.
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Fury13
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Username: Fury13

Post Number: 1096
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 69.222.11.226
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:27 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And for the record, lots of folks from my generation prefer natural wood trim, hardwood floors, wainscoating, coved ceilings, wet plaster, brick work, etc. -- all hallmarks of the craftsmanship of a bygone era.

The WWII generation bought the cookie-cutter suburban homes, in droves.
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Deputy_mayor_2026
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Username: Deputy_mayor_2026

Post Number: 68
Registered: 04-2006
Posted From: 64.12.116.204
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:28 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Fury13, I inferred it, not Aram.
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 462
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:47 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Eastsidedog, perhaps you will one day learn that not everyone chooses to live the "urban" lifestyle you seem so intent on cramming down everyone's throat and if people choose to live in the suburbs it's okay.



Wait a sec. I thought everyone "chooses to live the "urban" lifestyle [I] seem so intent on cramming down everyone's throat." So they don't and it's okay to live in the suburbs? Gotcha. Sorta...

On the other hand, I was just saying that the reason's people often cite for living in the suburbs seem a bit skewed. Beneath the thin veneer of suburban-lifestlye-justificati on lie many behaviors which perpetuate the severe problems of modern American society - oil-dependence, severe economic segregation, techological alienation, rampant consumerism, intolerance and poverty.

Big Cities on the other hand tend to encourage a mixture of incomes and uses, city densities encourage mass transit, sense of community and tolerance is essential (since we live close together we have to get along), and less of a focus on home gadgetry (Jacuzzi's, Big Screen TVs, Radar Dish's, uber-large kitchen's - what's going on in the neighborhood can often be more interesting than what's on 1000 channels of cable.)

Sorry. I just think big cities are better than suburbs. Suburbs have always been around and their is nothing wrong with a few suburbs around a city for people who want more privacy, more house for the money and don't mind a longer commute (this was basically how it was way back when). But suburbs have morphed into a totally different animal, especially in metro Detroit. 3 out of 4 Metro Detroiters live in the suburbs. Most of the jobs are in the suburbs, with most folks commuting suburb to suburb with insufficient transportation systems to get them there. Detroit freeways are built to whisk people in and out of downtown. But now many people commute from western suburbs to eastern suburbs. It seems to me that it would be better for everyone to rebuild the city and use the existing infrastructure rather than scrap the city and build and all new one between Oakland and Macomb counties.

To much of anything is bad for you, and too much suburbs (and too little city) has definitely been bad for Metro Detroit.
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Atl_runner
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Username: Atl_runner

Post Number: 1917
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 198.151.12.10
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 2:56 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm not sure the city vs suburbs was being argued here until it was brought up. New Urbanism does not have to be in the suburbs. In other words, I think Jefferson village would have made a great spot to go total New Urbanism. I regret that they chose not to.
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Esd
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Username: Esd

Post Number: 28
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 160.109.103.190
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 3:02 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Quote: "On the other hand, I was just saying that the reason's people often cite for living in the suburbs seem a bit skewed. Beneath the thin veneer of suburban-lifestlye-justificati on lie many behaviors which perpetuate the severe problems of modern American society - oil-dependence, severe economic segregation, techological alienation, rampant consumerism, intolerance and poverty."

All this from living in the suburbs, no wonder why they leave such a bad taste in your mouth. Seems that you may be intolerant of those that choose to live a lifestyle that you do not agree with.
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Lexdetroitman_07
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Username: Lexdetroitman_07

Post Number: 34
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 74.131.204.36
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 3:04 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Suburbs are just fine with me, but experiencing the city firsthand on a daily basis is a great experience.

Lexdetroitman_07
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Rosedaleken
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Username: Rosedaleken

Post Number: 173
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 68.43.122.151
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 3:27 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"high-quality architecture with high-tech touches"

Crappy homes in closer proximity are stil crappy.
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Fishtoes2000
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Username: Fishtoes2000

Post Number: 101
Registered: 06-2005
Posted From: 69.14.26.135
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 3:28 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

Commodore64 wrote, "Real homes are made with bricks."



Commodores sang, "She's a brick -- house!"
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 463
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 3:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

All this from living in the suburbs, no wonder why they leave such a bad taste in your mouth. Seems that you may be intolerant of those that choose to live a lifestyle that you do not agree with.



No Esd, I'm not really intolerant at all. I have lots of friends who live in the inner suburbs (and in the city). I don't dislike people for their decisions, it hardly ever comes up really. But that doesn't change how I feel personally. Really the suburbs aren't the problem in Metro Detroit anymore, it's the exurbs (and the extreme product of suburbanization: gated communities) that are the real problem.

The old Detroit suburbs have more in common with Detroit than the shiny new exurbs. They have similar problems. The exurbs now threaten the health and vibrance of the older inner ring suburbs.

A bunch of my friends from college grew up in Sterling Heights and hated it. They now live in Ferndale, which is like the city to them. But I grew up in Ferndale in the 80's and 90's and I always thought it was lame and suburban. Boy was I wrong... it can be so much more boring and lame...
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 464
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 3:56 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

I'm not sure the city vs suburbs was being argued here until it was brought up. New Urbanism does not have to be in the suburbs.



Agreed Alt_runner. But it's hard to talk about housing decisions and not talk about location. The article totally misses the mark and gives the idea that affluent gen Xers predominantly want to by new houses in new subdivisions (like "Cherry Hill Village" in Canton) which is far from the truth. Maybe the late 30's gen Xers with families, but most everyone I know in their late 20's early 30's wants to live/buy in the city or near it.
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Esd
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Username: Esd

Post Number: 29
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 160.109.103.190
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 3:59 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Quote: "Really the suburbs aren't the problem in Metro Detroit anymore, it's the exurbs (and the extreme product of suburbanization: gated communities) that are the real problem."

Explain to me how the exurbs are the problem for Detroit when almost every other large city in the nation are sorrounded by suburbs and exurbs yet the downtown areas and the cities themselves are thriving?
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Hamtramck_steve
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Username: Hamtramck_steve

Post Number: 2983
Registered: 10-2003
Posted From: 136.181.195.17
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 4:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Different state laws. Michigan has probably the pre-eminent set of Home Rule laws in the nation, allowing every group of 5 farmers to create their own fiefdom.
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 465
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 68.20.140.8
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 4:11 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Esd, uh... because Metro Detroit has little population growth and those cities have booming populations? Those cities are building exurbs for new people. No one would complain about exurbs outside the old suburbs if their was an economic and population boom in Metro Detroit.

The types of housing described in the article, like Cherry Hill Village, really benefit Metro Detroit and Michigan by creating more efficient compact growth, using less land and resources, and maintaining some semblance of density and community.

Didn't you hear? McMansions and strip malls aren't cool anymore.
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Valkyrias
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Username: Valkyrias

Post Number: 261
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 69.47.103.87
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 4:17 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

ugh, those houses and neighborhoods are just as bad, if not worse, than the cookie cutter, boring beige neighborhoods. they are trying to be something they are not (an older looking neighborhood with varied architecture to the houses) and it's painfully obvious. a friend of mine lives in a new subdivision full of these houses right outside columbus. it's located on an old farm. and i'll admit the houses are cute, but let's call a spade a spade. it's still urban sprawl at it's absolute worst.
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Mackinaw
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Username: Mackinaw

Post Number: 1656
Registered: 02-2005
Posted From: 71.144.81.93
Posted on Friday, June 02, 2006 - 4:23 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The truth of the matter is, the modern, post-1950s and especially post-1970s take on suburbs and suburban life creates an outcome which is inefficient from a land-use perspective, and irresponsible, especially when you look at a place like metro Detroit, which builds new and outwards 'just because,' even though population is not increasing.

Danindc's post at 12:35 was pure gold. I have also told folks on this forum that the suburbs certainly do not have a monopoly on 'green space,' 'peace and quiet,' etc. It's really a cop-out when people cite this sort of crap and then move to low-density subdivisions. I say, if you really want some freakin' green space, take a trip up to the UP and hike the national forests.

Now, studies also have shown that living in a traditional urban neighborhood is generally good for your health. You are less sedantary in these settings because you can walk to do everyday tasks--and because you normally have a sidewalk to walk on.
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Dillpicklesoup
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Username: Dillpicklesoup

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2006
Posted From: 64.7.187.81
Posted on Saturday, June 03, 2006 - 7:44 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'll take a lakefront home with 4 X 6 construction, Anderson windows, and double insulation- I did own a 3 story english tudor in lovely royal oak- I could always count on something drastically going wrong with it-
If you buy an older home with character- make sure that you have a barrel of money for repairs-
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Pdtpuck
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Username: Pdtpuck

Post Number: 37
Registered: 01-2006
Posted From: 208.251.168.194
Posted on Sunday, June 04, 2006 - 3:04 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

When I attended the International Builders' Show in January, one of the overriding themes was to build homes more relevant to the interests of potential buyers.



well, no schitt!

I thought being in business was to cater to people who don't want to buy what you have to offer!

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