Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2007 What if Highland Park was absorbed/annexed into Detroit Previous Next
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Exmotowner
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Post Number: 237
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Guys this may have been beaten to death before. If so please humor me. Should/could Detroit annex Highland park? I know that Highland park is in bad shape too, but what would be the pro's and con's of this idea? Could/would it make Highland Park better or make Detroit worse. Right now Highland park is basically Wayne county's problem right? Just been mulling this idea over and was wondering what the concenses be?
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Spiritofdetroit
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Username: Spiritofdetroit

Post Number: 399
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It should be consolidated. Extremely inefficient to have separate services, separate government, etc. 2 of everything. It really should become a part of Detroit proper
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6nois
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Post Number: 161
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:42 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think it would be good for Detroit to annex Highland Park, on the condition that the state pays for some massive amounts of work that need to be done in H.P. because of its basically missing city government and services. It would be a burden for the challenged city of Detroit to take this on with out some help from the state. And without that help I doubt things would change in Highland Park it would just be adding another bad neighborhood to the city.
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Crew
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Post Number: 1227
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:44 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Unfortunately, the state is in no position to help anyone financially.
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Toog05
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Post Number: 137
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:46 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So the conclusion is not now, but maybe in the future when it becomes financially feasible.
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6nois
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Post Number: 163
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Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:49 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would agree toog.
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Exmotowner
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Post Number: 238
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:54 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hamtramik is still viable and doing ok right? Are those the only two "cities" within detroit?

And you guys are right. The state is in no shape to help, nor the federal goverment for that matter till we get out of Iraq and start minding things at home (like Detroit)! We can go re-build 2 countrys and cant help our own when we need to!
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Jjaba
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Post Number: 5238
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Top ten reasons for Detroit to Annex Highland Park.

10. Great library.
9. Excellent police dept. and top schools.
8. Wonderful performing arts venue.
7. Huge Ford and Chrysler offices and plants.
6. Manchester Yards on the streetcar lines.
5. Sanders Hot Fudge on Oakman BLVD.
4. Ex-cell-O office and factory.
3. Great shopping district including Sears Store.
2. Davison Ditch, America's first expressway.
1. Lowell Boileau lives there.

Detroit, go for it.

jjaba, Westsider.
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6nois
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Post Number: 164
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 1:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hamtramck is doing fine. It has it problems, but no where near the issues of Highland Park. I don't think there is any reason to make Hamtramck a part of Detroit. Yes, those are the only two cities in Detroit.
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Dustin89
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Post Number: 4
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Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 4:51 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The only issues that I can think of that may arise with Detroit annexing Highland Park are a loss of community identity and history, and the reverse of what you guys are saying: instead of looking at it as Detroit taking on the added stress of Highland Park's problems, it could also be seen as Highland Park assuming Detroit's problems and perhaps stunting future growth, as it would now be directly affected by every Detroit crisis-financial and otherwise.
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Supersport
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Post Number: 11504
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Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 5:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is my understanding that if Highland Park were to be annexed, Hamtramck would have to be as well. Something to the effect that no city can exist within the boundaries of Detroit without sharing a boundary with another city, another city aside from Detroit. Can't recall where I read that, or perhaps where I heard that, so somebody please correct me if this is untrue.
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Ray1936
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Post Number: 1341
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 5:04 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How 'bout Highland Park annexing Detroit??? :-)
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Professorscott
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Post Number: 290
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 5:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, in Michigan, there is no way for a city to annex another city. Cities can only annex townships, under certain circumstances. The state would have to change a law somewhere in order for this to happen. (...and good luck with that!)

I have never heard of the thing to which Supersport refers.

Not to mention: how would such an annexation benefit Detroit, since Detroit would have to agree to such a thing?
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Detroitnerd
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Username: Detroitnerd

Post Number: 835
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 5:16 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Speaking of redundancies, we could get rid of one of the redundant ward-heeler mayors. Take your pick: Kilpatrick or Blackwell.
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Ro_resident
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Post Number: 218
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 5:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

One city cannot annex another city under the Michigan Constitution.

However, cities can consolidate. It has to be done under criteria established by the Michigan Boundary Commission, voting by the two (or more) communities, among other criteria.

Farmington and Farmington Hills are currently investigating whether to incorporate into a single city called "Farmington".

I had not heard anything about Hamtramck being required to consolidate if HP does. That would seem to be a violation of the Home Rule Act.

Who knows if Detroit would even want to take over HP at this point. It would be an expensive proposition at this point.
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Professorscott
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Post Number: 291
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Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 6:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Ro_resident for the clarification.

Ontario has, over the past fifteen years or so, required communities to consolidate, for economic reasons. So for instance every community in the former Kent County is now officially dissolved, and all of them and the former County are now the "Municipality of Chatham-Kent".

This idea generates quite a bit of heat and smoke, however, when one attempts to quietly discuss whether such an idea would benefit the nearly bankrupt state of Michigan and its many hundreds of nearly bankrupt communities. I bet ten cents at least one flame follows this post, on this thread.
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5394
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Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 7:19 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, the real question is why would Detroit want to consolidate with Highland Park?

BTW, does anyone know what services Highland Park contracts out to Detroit, if any? I'm wondering how many Highland Parker's already use some Detroit services (i.e. fire, police, library, trash collection...)
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Psip
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Post Number: 1828
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 7:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Highland Park has one crown jewel. That is its own water system. It was built by Henry Ford. I have heard it has never operated at full capacity.
Warren would LOVE to get that part of it.
http://hpfolks.com/articles_20 04/HPF_articles_2004/got_water _2004/index.html
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Eric_w
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Username: Eric_w

Post Number: 133
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 9:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba
My dad worked a Ex-Cello & later I worked in that building 14310 Hamilton which houses Helm Incorporated now. One part on the complex used to be the old trolley barns. That's a real jewel!!!!
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Detroitrulez
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Username: Detroitrulez

Post Number: 242
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 9:56 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hamtramck is doing fine??!!?? jeezus christ, how long have you folks lived here...two years? do you not know about ham-town's fiscal difficulties over the past decade? It is astounding at times.
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5396
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Friday, April 20, 2007 - 10:30 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hamtown is doing much better than HP, fiscally, if even its just recently come out of receivership. HP is still in receivership.
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Lowell
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Post Number: 3810
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 12:11 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How about West Bloomfield or Grosse Pointe annexing Highland Park, places with money and no burdens?

Why should Detroit which, like HP, is stuck caring for just about all the poor, homeless, ex-felons, disabled and other challenged people and carrying that load for the rest of the communities in the metropolis want to take on HP's burdens too?

Poor HP is left to fend for herself.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 5246
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 12:44 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Under Lowell's proposal, Highland Park will be renamed:

South Bloomfield or West Pointe.

They would Michigan's first city clearly in two distinct parts.

With West Bloomfield, HP gets learned teachers, new synagogues, a mikva, a Jewish Community Center, classically trained black violinists, and wonderful bakeries.

With Grosse Pointe, HP gets boating lessons, high tea and scones, debutante parties, and dudes playing basketball wearing no socks.

Both are very good options, except for the continual breaks for silent auctions and testimonial dinners every other night.

jjaba, LOL.
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Jjaba
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Post Number: 5247
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 12:46 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Now if Hazel Park merged with Highland Park, you'd have Hazel Highland Parktucky, with a new hockey rink.

jjaba.
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Danny
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Post Number: 5838
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 12:51 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Annexing Highland Park to Detroit would be a good ideal, but the problem is Detroit may have to deal the an extra 3 million dollar budget deficit and more vacant buildings in its ghettohoods.
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Milwaukee
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Post Number: 1251
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 1:09 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I believe its a bad idea. Highland Park has a great long history and it would be a shame for it to just become a legend. Highland Park is its own town with its own history. They should keep the two cities seperate. Plus Detroit's got enough problems. Annexing Highland Park won't make things any easier for the city.

(Message edited by milwaukee on April 21, 2007)
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Milwaukee
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Post Number: 1252
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 1:18 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

To be honest, the future for Highland Park is bleak. The civic center was shut down completely. Are there even police left? 16,000 residents down from 52,000. 64% unemployment rate, 39% of residents living in poverty, average commute time is over 30 minutes. As soon as those who have jobs who have that commute can move, they will. People are getting out and fast. There's no hope in that town. It's a ghost town.

(Message edited by milwaukee on April 21, 2007)
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Milwaukee
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Post Number: 1253
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 1:20 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It's also a rather dumb city. Only 63 percent of residents have a high school degree, while 6.1 percent have college degree's. If you're smart, you aren't living in Highland Park.

I probably sound like a negative ass, but things are BAD for that town.
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Spiritofdetroit
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Username: Spiritofdetroit

Post Number: 401
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 3:08 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ummm,so completely disregard your first post?? As I do many of yours already...
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Lmichigan
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Post Number: 5401
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 3:42 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was wondering that, too. If its future is bleak, and you really care about it, than you'd want it to be joined with a larger city, who's fiscal situation is not good, itself, but a whole hell of a lot better than Highland Park's. BTW, unlike Hamtramck, Highland Park, being right on Woodward and in Detroit's North End, it's really been tied to Detroit from the beginning, historically and culturally. It's another Detroit neighborhood. The idea that the city needs to be saved just because its an independent neighborhood within Detroit is wasteful.
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Rfban
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Post Number: 61
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 6:13 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't understand why people think that just because a municipality is annexed it has lose its culture? No, why?
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Lmichigan
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Post Number: 5402
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 6:44 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Highland Park would almost definitely fade into just being another neighborhood. For an annexed/consolidated community to keep its character is has to have a distinct character at the time of annexation. IMO, HP is almost physically identical to Detroit in built and connection, same size blocks, similar housing...
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Luckycar
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Post Number: 14
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 7:16 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Milwaukee,you state that the ave. commute time in H.P. is 30 minutes?I think I could run across H.P. in 25!30 minutes to where?Just a thought.
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Exmotowner
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Post Number: 245
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 8:30 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, I dont think Highland park would not necessarily have to loose its identity or history. It would just become highland park the neighborhood (that used to be a great city). I dont see any reason for Gross Pointe or W. Bloomfield to want to anex HP though. My idea and original thought was to Save Highland Park because it does have such great history. It obviously will continue to exist no matter what, but if Detroit gets back on its feet and becomes the great city it was and we all hope will become again, I do believe if and when the D is doing good it should annex it if it can. I dont understand this thing about not being able to do it legally in Michigan. W. Bloomfield annexed part of Walled lake from Drake to Haggerty.
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Milwaukee
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Post Number: 1254
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 10:52 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Spiritofdetroit, you don't have to disregard that post or any of my other posts. My argument is why would an already poor city take on more debt, crime, and poverty?

Lmichigan, that's the problem, Highland Park if annexed will just become a neighborhood. One more crappy, run-down, dangerous neighborhood. It would just add to Detroit's list of problems. Detroit is in no condition to take on huge problem like Highland Park. Highland Park has a better chance being managed by the state. Now the state isn't perfect, but its in much better condition to take on a problem like Highland Park.

I do believe that its annexation would equal a loss of history. It would be a final demoralizing blow for that great little city. Once the generation of people who lived there dies off, then it will be all but forgotten.

Luckycar, check out the American factfinder. It has stats on every town and city in America. Included in there is the average commute time. I would assume most in Highland Park who work, travel north to work at low pay service jobs in Oakland County where the economy is better.

Here's a link to Highland Park stats.
http://factfinder.census.gov/s ervlet/SAFFFacts?_event=Search &geo_id=&_geoContext=&_street= &_county=Highland+Park&_cityTo wn=Highland+Park&_state=04000U S26&_zip=&_lang=en&_sse=on&pct xt=fph&pgsl=010&show_2003_tab= &redirect=Y
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Urbanize
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Post Number: 963
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 11:32 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There's still a Sears store in Highland Park????
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Rhymeswithrawk
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Post Number: 671
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 11:35 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No way.
It would help Highland Park, but Detroit does not need more burned out buildings and run-down homes. That place is worse than just about any section in Detroit. Even Woodward has bombed-out shells of buildings that look like the aftermath of 1967.
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Dustin89
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 11:43 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There was an editorial in either the News or Free Press about a year back supporting a consolidation/annexation of Highland Park into Detroit, and I haven't heard much of this idea since. Highland Park doesn't have much to make it a draw for future residents. Detroit does have downtown, several colleges, and many cultural/entertainment entities that make it appealing. But Detroit is already struggling just to provide its own citizens with city services, and adding more semi-populated land to the city with abandonment and crime problems is not going to help anybody. If Highland Park is going to survive or even bounce back, I suspect it will happen with the city being independent, and some serious business investment.
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Bulletmagnet
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Post Number: 321
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 12:41 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jjaba, lets not forget while taking in the cities' exuberance to count the out-of-sync stop lights at every Woodward intersection (as to not run over any of the teeming throng). Number 1.5 would have to be H.P. resident Stephen Goodfellow, as an asset for Detroit.


Bulletmagnet
Proudly Eastside

(Message edited by Bulletmagnet on April 21, 2007)
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Mcp001
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Post Number: 2573
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 12:47 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If the concept of "larger is better", as espoused by Granholm, et al is the magic cure-all that people seem to be looking for, than why are the services offered by the City of Detroit not exactly drawing the praise from its own residents (i.e. street lighting, refuse pickup, police services, etc.)?
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Lmichigan
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Post Number: 5404
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 5:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

First off, as bad a state as Detroit is in, Highland Park is in even worse trouble. As great a town as HP may have been, it doesn't have the history that will, and is, saving large swaths of Detroit. HP had a population of 427 in 1900, and just 4,120 people in 1910, meaning most of it was constructed from 1910 to 1930. Nice, old housing, but nothing you're not going to find in Palmer Park.

Secondly and lastly, consolidation isn't some Granholm idea, it's something that's been tried in countless states by peoples of various political leanings, so you can stop with the stupid politicking.

HP is going to need a rapid transit line up Woodward to offer the citizens more choices in jobs outside the city, and possibly a consolidation with Detroit to give the independent neighborhood a fighting chance.

(Message edited by lmichigan on April 21, 2007)
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Jman
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 5:25 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Most of the construction and population came when Henry Ford offered $5.00 per day.
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Neilr
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Post Number: 493
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 5:25 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Nice, old housing, but nothing you're not going to find in Palmer Park.


Lmichigan, on that point I disagree. To me, Highland Park has the largest, best preserved stock of Craftsman houses and California bungalows that are to be found in the metro area. They are concentrated in the two historic districts in the city. If you have not seen them, I recommend that you put them on your "must see" list.
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Lmichigan
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 5:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Fair point, though, I guess it shows my bias as I'm not a big fan of bungalows. My only point was that unlike Hamtramck, which has always had a very strong ethnic base to tie the city together, Highland Park's history mirrored much of Detroit's history after the boom of the auto. I mean, even the street grid pretty much continues through from one side of the city to the next. Hamtramck, on the other hand, has narrower blocks, more alleys...etc. I just don't see Highland Park disappearing more than it already has if it consolidates with Detroit. Perhaps, during its younger years this would have been an issue, but, as optimistic as I try to be, to me, HP as it once existed, doesn't exist anymore. And, that's even more so than a lot of Detroit.

I'm just wondering how much further the population has to fall before people realize that this tiny enclave was unviable (i.e. a tax base unable to support a city government) YEARS ago? This isn't like Detroit where there are still multiple viable nodes of activity that can be connected to energize a revitalization. HP can't stand on its own, anymore. It's best chance is becoming a Detroit neighborhood, perhaps, with an agreement for limited self-rule, so that it, perhaps, can become one of those nodes/zones with access to all of Detroit's grant knowledge.
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Jjaba
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Post Number: 5248
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 5:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The American Bungalow and the Arts and Crafts movement provided a style of homes from 1905-25. Millions were built in the USA.

The Medbury-Grove Lawn Residential Neighborhood of Highland Park is on the National Register of Historic Places and worthy of a visit.
Homes here were built 1914-24 along Eason, Moss, and Puritan Avenues, from Woodward to Hamilton Ave. The closer to Woodward, the larger the homes.

Notable homes are:

Henry Kohner at 179 Eason Ave., bungalow, 1919.
Fremont Barrett at 55 Puritan Ave., Craftsman, 1915.
Leonard B. Willeke, 39 Moss Ave., 1920.

Other period revivial styles are also in the district.

Henry Ford engaged Albert Kahn to build the world's largest auto factory in Highland Park, 1909-1920. Everybody knows those famous movies of the first automobile assembly line, with finished cars coming out the building along Manchester Avenue.

The Chrysler World Headquarters was also in Highland Park, along Oakland Avenue, east of Woodward Ave.

With a huge need for housing, the importation of immigrants from Europe, Mexico, and the Middle East, Highland Park grew rapidly in all directions. We should be reminded that the term "boarder" was used back then to mean a worker who slept on a closet door, a boarder, above the floor on two kitchen chairs.

Prior to 1904, Highland Park was a vast 3 sq. miles of farms and woods.

jjaba, Lessons in History.
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Lmichigan
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Post Number: 5407
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 6:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And, before all of that, the tiny settlement was first settled sometime in the early 1800's on a prominent ridge, from which the city takes its name. Two former judges Woodward and Witherell, both attempted failed settlements on the ridge, in 1825 and 1836, respectively. Woodward named his planned village "Woodwardville" (no ego, here. lol).

By 1873, the tiny settlement was granted a post office under the name of Whitewood, and after many closings and reopenings, the settlement was incorporated as the Village of Highland Park in 1889. The rest, as they say, is history.

Jjaba, do you happen to know what township Highland Pak belonged to? In fact, does anyone know where I can find some historic maps of the townships Detroit ate up in its sprawl?
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Milwaukee
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Username: Milwaukee

Post Number: 1259
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 6:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Nice, old housing, but nothing you're not going to find in Palmer Park."

I agree it is nice housing and that the homes aren't spectacular mansions, but that doesn't make it any less significant than Palmer Woods.

We went through Highland Park last week and it was quite depressing and horrible.

I would like to say that maybe the homes aren't significant, but look at those spectacular apartment buildings. They will never build that style or quality of building again. Those apartment buildings are a great asset to the city.

Why don't you like bungalows? They're wonderful solid and functional but also classy and sophisticated structures.
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Jjaba
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Post Number: 5251
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 7:09 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bungalows get their name from Bangalore, India. The style evolved through the British into Calif. and spread acorss the USA like wildfire.

Sears and other companies made kits and sent them by rail.

Carpenters used native materials and Asian accents depending upon their tastes.

Besides Highland Park, Mich. or Berwyn, Illinois, where in Detroit do you like the bungalows?

Highland Park Postoffice, AKA Detroit 03, Michigan is a great WPA model from the 1930s.

jjaba.
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Lmichigan
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Post Number: 5408
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Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 7:51 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Milwaukee,

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying Highland Park doesn't have a good housing stock, but using that to try and justify that that means that it deserves to be independent, duplicating services that could be provided surrounding Detroit, just isn't enough for me.

Let's just put it this way using the census numbers of 2000:

- Population: 16,746 (and shrinking)

- 33% of households make less than $10,000 a year, and nearly 59% make less than $25,000 a year

- Median Household Income: $17,737

- Median family Income: $26,484

- Families below poverty line: 32.1%

- Individuals below poverty line: 38.3%

This would be MUCH less of a burden on a Detroit administration as it is to a Highland Park administration. With those numbers (which continue to shrink by the month), and little to no hope of attracting anything near middle class residents, there is no possible way, save for razing the whole city and marketing it towards industry, that Highland Park could ever dig itself out of its whole, emergency financial manager, or not.

To me, some type of consolidation, is long overdue for a storied city that really deserves another chance.
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6nois
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Username: 6nois

Post Number: 165
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 - 11:13 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You can find a ton of bunglows in Bay City, MI, where most of them were made by the Aladdin Co. Overall besides money there is no reason why Highland Park is it's own city. As for Hamtramck its has had troubles, yes but there is alot going for it. Including the fact that is listed as one of the hippest neighborhoods in the country for the music scene. Highland Park is just a shell of what was once great.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 5253
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 12:53 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba will have to check out the Aladdin Co. areas of Bay City, Michigan.

Thanks.
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Milwaukee
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Username: Milwaukee

Post Number: 1260
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 1:05 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey Jjaba, you've got to check out Shorewood, Wisconsin. It's an old streetcar suburb of Milwaukee. Most of the homes there are bungalows.

I know Chicago has a famous bungalow belt also. I assume you'll find any and every type of bungalow in Chicago.

Lmichigan,

I agree with you about what a dire state its in and adding it to Detroit would lessen its financial woes, but don't you think renovating or repopulating Highland Park will be at the end of Detroit's huge agenda.

I can't help but think that once annexed, it would quickly fall on a list of to do's for Detroit. Detroit doesn't have the time or money to take on and try and improve poor old Highland Park. Detroit is just trying to survive right now, they don't need or probably want to take on this extra burden.

Highland Park will just fade away and become just another run down and blown out part of Detroit, no more important to the city than any of its other scarred praries.

All that being said, I have no realistic idea as to how Highland Park is ever going to pull itself up. I just sure as heck know that it won't be Detroit pulling it up in the near future.
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 4161
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 1:10 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jjaba, at least if Highland Park were incorporated into Detroit, it would be sort of a 50-50 split.... half would go to the Eastside, half to the Westside. Can't get much more equitable that that! :-)

And another thing Jjaba... "Westside" gives a hit on spell checker error, whereas "Eastside" does not! :-)
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Digitaldom
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Username: Digitaldom

Post Number: 619
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 1:13 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was always curious why those cities have not become part of Detroit. I mean I can understand them still being called a neighborhood or persay.. But having a city within a city was always curious in my mind.. Why did Detroit Wrap around them?

I know chicago has neighborhoods or districts named.. as does New york.. But do they have cities within cities.. Please explain bc honestly I want to know.. because honestly I don't know..

Does anyone have a detailed history on How detroit grew? I knew there were alot of annexations in the past.. But why didn't highland park and ham.. follow suit? Any one know.. I am really curious about this subject! :-)
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Digitaldom
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Username: Digitaldom

Post Number: 620
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 1:33 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

found this quite interesting.. I history of annex of detroit map.. check this out..!

http://www.detroit1701.org/Ann exation%20Map.html
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5409
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 2:03 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Milwaukee,

You keep bringing up the point that HP would become 'just another rundown neighborhood of Detroit.' Would you mind telling me how that is substantially different than what it is, today, and that's "another rundown independent neighborhood of Detroit?"

Seriously, I'm confused as to why you're holding onto it keeping its status as an independent neighborhood as if that makes, or has made, much of a difference. If anything, that it remains independent permanently handicaps it. If even it would be completely forgotten about under Detroit rule (and it wouldn't as a prominent commercial strip on Woodward), at least it wouldn't have to worry about paying bills that it shouldn't be paying, anyway. Essentially, dissolving the city government would give those that care about the community better avenues, and more time, to empower the community.

At the current time, and for the forseeable future, HP government serve no other purpose than to mitigate loss every fiscal year. Imagine if those same elected officials and city officers used the time they currently are in trying to figure out what they are going to have to cut, every year, to figure out how to lure business, alleviate poverty...

A consolidated HP-Detroit would give the neighborhood of Highland Park once hell of a strong neighborhood association.

I can't even imagine the state of some currently viable neighborhoods in Detroit if they were independent entities having to worry about a shrinking population and tax base, every year. Actually, I can. They'd probably look a lot like Highland Park.
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5410
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 2:11 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Digital,

Houston, Indianapolis, and Los Angeles are three cities, off the top of my head, that I know surround independent enclaves.

I suspect Highland Park was incorporated because of the Ford Plant, and Ford wanting to wield power/influence over a smaller community (i.e. being able to manipulate the local government into having lower taxes by threatening to leave the community if they didn't), as opposed be beholden to the monster that was/is Detroit government. I'm just speculating, but it's really the only thing I can think of seeing as how the city practically didn't exist before the Ford Plant. It seems very likely it had to do with getting lower taxes.

HP Ford Assembly was completed in 1909, HP incorporates just 9 years later as Detroit begins to go on a serious land-grabbing spree.

Same can be said for Hamtramck. In 1914, the Dodge Plant is completed. The city is incorporated in 1922 to protect its assets. (i.e. Dodge Plant).
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 293
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 2:17 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The facts are:

Detroit would gain nothing by annexing HP.

It would be politically difficult to accomplish such a thing.

Michigan does not have any leadership at all, and will not insist on communities combining to become more efficient.

Therefore, HP will remain independent whether it makes any sense or not.
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Digitaldom
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Username: Digitaldom

Post Number: 621
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 2:26 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes L-michigan that makes complete sense.. it's exactly what I have read as well... I agree with you completely..

I know I heard from several people that those areas have MANY business.. yet outside of them.. Detroit borders they have not bc of high taxes...

Detroit is in that sort of problem that everyone knows about... I will start another post the will pose a very interesting concept...
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5411
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 2:49 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Professorscott,

Detroit would get an instant 16,000 new tax payers, if even still a shrinking city, the population loss, so far, is estimated as far less than the exodus of the last census for HP. There are areas of the city, I'd bet, are losing population faster.

Also, a Detroit-Highland Park consolidation would be one of the more easy ones in the city, if not the most easy, so, I'm not so sure I buy that particular reason. I agree with your last line, but out of different reasoning, mainly, simple laziness.

(Message edited by lmichigan on April 22, 2007)
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Urbanize
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Username: Urbanize

Post Number: 975
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 8:06 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with the both of you, more so PS. Although true Lmich that they will be 16,000 new taxpayers, you must take several things into consideration that roughly about 100,000 to 1 Million dollars in tax revenue. One, you must provide civil service for those people. That's all the money gone right there. However, take into account that you have people leaving from HP and other parts of the city. 16,000 people added to the pop. will not balance things out at all anyway you put it considering that you have 100,000 people leaving yearly and the fact that your income from HP is mostly Lower Class wealth.

Also, PS pointed out that Detroit will gain nothing from HP. He's right. We would gain more from mreging with Hamtramack than HP (Urban Density, Decent 1930s style neighborhoods, more fire departments and police station) Although in reality, wouldn't help either way because Detroit would still have to pay for those stations. Higland Park from what I can see is nothing but a wasteland with Colonials slowly falling to pieces and/or burning down weekly. the city does not need their troubles on it's hands until we can solve our own.
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Exmotowner
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Username: Exmotowner

Post Number: 246
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 8:38 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think if Detroit is to really make a come back HP has to be addresed seriously. If not it would be a huge ulcer right in the middle of viable neighborhoods. Not sure about some of the other borders but from what I hear its the buildings in Palmer park right along 6 mile that are the worst. The poverty and crime in highland park most definetly affects Detroit.
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6nois
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Username: 6nois

Post Number: 168
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 22, 2007 - 10:47 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The more I think about, I think the burden of merging is outweighed by the benifits of having control over Highland Park which can help refuel neighborhoods in Detroit that are close to H.P. As exmotowner pointed out it is an ulcer that feeds off the fringes.
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Solotraveler
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Username: Solotraveler

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Monday, April 23, 2007 - 7:27 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The only way to help Detroit, Highland Park and Hamtramck is for Wayne County to go from local government to a regional government. Better yet, turn Metropolitan Detroit into a regional government. Make Macomb and Oakland County Bourghs of Metro Detroit. It would give Metro Detroit prestige with a population of 4,500,000 people. It would help change the politics in this city and downtown Detroit would thrive. All would benefit. Libraries, Universties, Public Schools, Parks and Public Utilities. It would also bring new business's. A good example of regional government is Toronto.

(Message edited by SoloTraveler on April 23, 2007)
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Danny
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Username: Danny

Post Number: 5841
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Monday, April 23, 2007 - 7:39 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't think so Solotraveler. Making Detroit into a regional government takes a whole tax base to change immediately not to mention to prevent folks playing RACE CARDS with regional politics.
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Trainman
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Username: Trainman

Post Number: 386
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2007 - 10:33 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There was a very strong effort to merge Detroit and Livonia.

It was called DARTA and this effort succeeded by the elimination of SMART.

DARTA supporters got exactly what they wanted because they hurt the African Americans and the low income to get new rail and freeways. They came to our city hall with no bibles.
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Scs100
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Username: Scs100

Post Number: 983
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2007 - 10:37 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What does that have to do with merging Highland Park and Detroit? Stick to the mass transit threads with that crap.
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Urbanize
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Username: Urbanize

Post Number: 1108
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2007 - 10:38 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

LOL, check the recent post in the Mass Transit thread Scs.

Ok, back on topic.
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Scs100
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Username: Scs100

Post Number: 984
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Saturday, May 05, 2007 - 10:45 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I saw that. Didn't really pay attention to it since he says that crap all the time.
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Paulmcall
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Username: Paulmcall

Post Number: 113
Registered: 05-2004
Posted on Sunday, May 06, 2007 - 2:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How many of those 16,000 have anything to tax???
Just what the city of Detroit needs is more people to take care of that can't take care of themselves.
The state is bailing them out now. Leave well enough alone.
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Swiburn
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Username: Swiburn

Post Number: 123
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 08, 2007 - 8:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

DId people get distracted here by other unrelated comments? You can only annex townships in Michigan, not cities, and nowadays that is hard enough to do.
So speculating about joining cities is kind of besides the point. And we aren't going to make any Canadian style "Cambridge" or "Lambton Shores" metropolises, either.
This area doesn't seem to do any regional cooperation, perhaps due to racial prejudices.
Things will drift along until perhaps there's some vote on changing the state law on annexations.
It's hard enough for school districts to consolidate to save money-too much sentimentality gets in the way of facts.
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5484
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, May 08, 2007 - 8:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No, it's not. Cities can consolidate. This is not about convention annexation. And, under special cases, cities can swap land with other cities. It's extremely hard for city-to-city annexations to occur, but the laws, here, do leave a loophole at the end of an expiration of a 425 Agreement.
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 339
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 08, 2007 - 11:42 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Can", okay. Has it ever happened? Ever, even once, in the entire history of Michigan?

Even if so, I'm not convinced it's a good idea, much less that it's possible.

Swiburn, reducing the number of tiny municipalities would be a very efficient thing to do; but we're idiots, so we won't do it.
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3rdworldcity
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Username: 3rdworldcity

Post Number: 620
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, May 09, 2007 - 1:32 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"What if Highland Park were absorbed/annexed into Detroit?"

Property values would decline.

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