Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2007 Not an empty nester anymore Previous Next
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Yelloweyes
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Username: Yelloweyes

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 8:29 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have been living in the city since 2000. I have lived in downtown Lofts and a house for the past few years. It has been great, but now comes family. My wife and I are forced with the question that many forumers might face, Do we move because of schools?
Private schools are expensive. DPS has way to many issues for us to even consider. For the cost of a private school it would be cheaper to move.

Who else faces this issue? What will happen to all of Detroit's new empty nesters in the upcoming decade? Will they stay or move out?
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Fnemecek
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Username: Fnemecek

Post Number: 2350
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 8:49 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

I have been living in the city since 2000. I have lived in downtown Lofts and a house for the past few years. It has been great, but now comes family. My wife and I are forced with the question that many forumers might face, Do we move because of schools?


How long do you have until your eldest child starts school?
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Granmontrules
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Username: Granmontrules

Post Number: 13
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 8:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

YOu don't have to leave because of schools. There are still many excellent schools. We have our children in DPS schools...and yes shockingly enough we are white. I would suggest you look at Burton Academy. It is diverse and great atmosphere for kids. Not all DPS schools are bad. You have to do your homework and talk to parents. I remember Crains did a "Living in the D" story recently (maybe October) and they had a booklet in there of top DPS schools. You just have to look. PEople are staying over 1/3 of the children in teh city are in charter or private schools now. Of our friends we are the only ones who have kids in DPS. Other than a few friends who are at Cass, Renaissance, or School of Arts.

Good luck and do your research with an open mind.
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Detroit_stylin
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Username: Detroit_stylin

Post Number: 3739
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 9:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Granmont
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Mpow
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Username: Mpow

Post Number: 235
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 9:23 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with grandmont too
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Yelloweyes
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Username: Yelloweyes

Post Number: 5
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 9:25 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We will be keeping an open mind. Race is not an issue, but rather diversity and culture. We prefer the school NOT be a majority of one race (white or black).

We have a good five years.

Burton Academy is located near Tiger Stadium I believe....and is a charter.
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Enduro
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Username: Enduro

Post Number: 50
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 11:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I live across from the Burton Academy (former Ben Franklin) and all the kids seem really well behaved and have never been an issue (a couple parents could use some finishing school what with the beeping and rare beer bottle).
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Smogboy
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Username: Smogboy

Post Number: 4438
Registered: 11-2004
Posted on Saturday, February 03, 2007 - 11:40 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bravo for the wonderful intelligent response, Yelloweyes.
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Mikeg
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Username: Mikeg

Post Number: 531
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 12:20 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Bravo for the wonderful intelligent response...



Seems to me that it contains a massive contradiction. On one hand, "Race is not an issue" but on the other, they prefer that the school NOT contain more than 50% of either black or white children.

If race is truly not an issue, it should not matter whether black or white students form a plurality or majority of the student body.

I would be more concerned about a school's focus on academics and results and whether they have a high level of expectation of their students.
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Sticks
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Username: Sticks

Post Number: 200
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 12:30 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

We prefer the school NOT be a majority of one race (white or black).


Is a plurality ok then?

:-)
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Detroitplanner
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Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 927
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 12:40 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

YE try Trinity or Friends schools. Both may be religious but they are open to all. I'm sure neither are cheap, but its an option.

Burton at one time used to not have a majority of anyone. I'm pretty sure they are not still at Cass and MLK though, so I am unsure of what the make-up is now.

In the grand scheme of things it is more important that at least one of the parents is involved with the child's education than any other issue. Good parents lead to good schools.

(Message edited by Detroitplanner on February 04, 2007)
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Jtw
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Username: Jtw

Post Number: 112
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 2:17 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mikeg, it seems to me that saying "race is not an issue" makes race an issue.

20 years ago or so, my parents moved to farmington from the NW side so that i could go to public school. with the dismal state that DPS is still in, how can anyone still be recommending that Yelloweyes have his children attend DPS?

it's a tough call to suggest moving right now (with the advantageous housing market for buyers) versus sticking it out for 5 years to see the improvements in DPS. i wish i had an answer.
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Gsgeorge
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Username: Gsgeorge

Post Number: 100
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 3:21 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think yelloweyes put it that way only because Granmont was the first one to say:

quote:

We have our children in DPS schools...and yes shockingly enough we are white.

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Granmontrules
Member
Username: Granmontrules

Post Number: 15
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 6:54 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think race is an issue with many people (esp white) - black people have been putting their children in mostly white schools for years. When I went to HS over 20 years ago - there was one black family (now I hear there are more) - it wasn't an issue for them. Why should it be an issue now? Do something different break that unwritten rule and start something that should be started in Detroit again - INTEGRATION. You shouldn't have to send your kids to schools where you don't feel safe, however, there are many DPS schools that are good and safe with excellent teachers that would gladly welcome more diversity into their classroom.
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Chuckles
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Username: Chuckles

Post Number: 15
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 7:32 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My 2c FWIW...

It is really about Parenting more than anything else.

That said...

Look for a school with a good academic rating, ask around...

chuckles
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Jjw
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Username: Jjw

Post Number: 247
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 8:00 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

public education is an issue in every major city in this country. It is not just a Detroit issue nor is it a black-white-yellow-brown issue. With the "No Child Left Behind" act, parents can place their children in schools that are meeting with success and maintaining standards. In Baltimore City, there are a number of such schools available--both public and charter that offer a good, taxed-paid education. Many parents of all colors in the city are opting to place their children in these schools regardless if they are in the neighborhood or not. Do some investigating and choose a school that you feel is right for your child. I am sure the city of Detroit has such schools available. There is one such school in my neighborhood that now has children from the county enrolled in it due to its progressive work. Above all else, be involved in your child's school. I will say in a down-note that the city of Baltimore has few options for middle-school age students and many parents leave or enroll their children in private school during those years.
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 405
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 2:24 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think that because Detroit is such a large school system that that actually works to the advantage of students. Yelloweyes, think of it this way: within DPS there are many opportunities that can't be granted on the other side of Eight Mile. DPS has the ability to have schools at different levels that specialize in whatever your child may be interested in from Cass Tech to the new arts school. Certainly there are schools that are not where you might want to send your child, but also within DPS there are many schools from which to choose with a rather wide selection of specialties. There are more schools in DPS compared with being just in a small suburban school district where your option might only be able to choose within the 3 high schools within that district. The best schools in Detroit are just as competitive with suburban ones, but offer even more options. But whatever you do decide to do, don't move to the suburbs and then decide that you want to send your kid(s) to private school after all. That is my biggest pet peeve on this issue.
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Mackcreative
Member
Username: Mackcreative

Post Number: 22
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 4:03 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yelloweyes, we went through the same issues with our daughter starting school. I called up a lot of schools and asked for a visit/tour. Some of the schools thought I was crazy, but getting inside during school hours, seeing teacher/student interaction is crucial, DPS wouldn't let me in the actual classrooms, but you can still learn a lot just walking around and observing children being disciplined. In Detroit, there are a variety of options with DPS, beyond that try the free charter schools, and don't rule out private schools--most have financial aid, scholarships, tuition breaks for multiple children, or installment financing. A lot of things are probably easier in the suburbs, but not necessarily better, look at the stats at some of those schools, yuck. We pay for private school because we believe in the future of Detroit, we like our quality of life here, but I'm not quite comfortable with DPS, hopefully someday, sigh.
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Yelloweyes
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Username: Yelloweyes

Post Number: 12
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 4:40 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mackcreative:
If you don't mind me asking. Which private did you decide and how has your experience been so far?
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Ravine
Member
Username: Ravine

Post Number: 606
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 4:49 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It feels good to see that some of you are responding positively to new DY poster Yelloweyes' request for feedback. It does not feel so good to see how some of you INSTANTLY jumped all over the perceived opportunity to find fault, nit-pick and smart-assedly challenge a person who is merely seeking feedback, a person who seems to bear no malice, hostility, or animus toward anyone in particular or general. Oh, wait. I said that it doesn't feel so good. I meant to say that it is fucking tiresome.
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Mackcreative
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Username: Mackcreative

Post Number: 23
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 4:51 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

She goes to the Detroit Waldorf School, it has been great, we're very happy with the school, small diverse class.
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Detroit_stylin
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Username: Detroit_stylin

Post Number: 3745
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 4:55 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ravine are u ok?

<<<Laffin
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Firstandten
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Username: Firstandten

Post Number: 71
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 5:17 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

yelloweyes if you want to stay public you can navigate thru DPS schools of choice and find a educationally good and safe school. There are hidden gems throughout the district but you may need to do some driving.
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Bob_cosgrove
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Username: Bob_cosgrove

Post Number: 458
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 6:00 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Two of my three children attended Burton Internaitonal School (Burton Academy) then on Cass south of Warren. This was in the 1980's and they received an excellent education and continued on to Cass Technical High School and Wayne State University.

My son if a chemical engineer with Jeep in Toledo and my daughter teaches Art and Cermanics in the Westland School System.

So, unless things have really changed in the past 20 years, I can recommend Burton highly.

Bob Cosgrove
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Neilr
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Username: Neilr

Post Number: 444
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 6:44 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Brigid Schulte, in today's Washington Post, could be talking about the climate in many Detroit Public Schools.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ wp-dyn/content/article/2007/02 /02/AR2007020201468.html
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Yelloweyes
Member
Username: Yelloweyes

Post Number: 15
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, February 04, 2007 - 8:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The Washington Post article is very inspiring for us urban-resettlers (as someone once called me). I am not concerned with test scores of a school. If parents are actively involved with their childs learning the school choice is somewhat secondary. It would like our children to attend a diverse school without paying $8 -$10,000 a year for private school. It would be nice if DPS was more diverse. Southwest Detroit maybe the most diverse area of the city and therefore the schools are diverse. I live and work on the eastside.
I agree with the article about the resegregation of schools. It's a tragedy.
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 421
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, February 05, 2007 - 8:12 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ravine, I second your thoughts. This is one of the most upbeat, carefully thought out, and interesting threads that I have seen in a long time on DetroitYES!
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Gannon
Member
Username: Gannon

Post Number: 8251
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 9:57 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Do you have to settle to REsettle?


Never compromise.


Start a homeschool.
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Swingline
Member
Username: Swingline

Post Number: 703
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 10:51 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yellow, don't let the schools issue force you to move. You have lots of time to plan, and the DPS can provide you with options. Don't feed the charter school beast though. (By the way, Burton International is not a charter school. It is a DPS school.) Charter schools are financially strangling the DPS.

Friends School and the Detroit Waldorf School have been around for a long time and many have posted on the forum about positive experiences there. The two private schools and the various parochial schools in Detroit all offer tuition assistance in one form or another. Most of these programs do top out at 50% to 75% of the tuition. So if you qualify for the assistance, at a minimum, you'll still be looking at $3000 to $4000 per year.
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Andylinn
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Username: Andylinn

Post Number: 310
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 12:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

the kids in my family (now aged 20-29) tried almost every city dweller school option, and all options proved fruitful... here's what we tried...

-Public School (in the 70s)
-Waldorf (in the 80s/early 90s)
-Catholic School (90s)
-Homeschooling (90s-2000s)

I'd be happy to discuss ANY of these options... They all work in my opinion... All four of the kids in my family went to a University (one to Madonna, three to U-M)

in my opinion, there is no reason to leave detroit because of schools.

(Message edited by andylinn on February 06, 2007)
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Yelloweyes
Member
Username: Yelloweyes

Post Number: 23
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 12:45 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You all have provided some insightful thoughts of education options as a city resident. Education is just one of those thorns in the side (as is city income tax) that makes moving out the easy way out.
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Danindc
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Username: Danindc

Post Number: 2123
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 3:32 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for sharing that article, Neilr. I found it kind of interesting, because despite the worries of the white middle class, Alexandria still has damn good schools. It's just that there are a lot of wealthy people who can afford to send their kids to private school.

I'm currently single, but I have no desire to ever raise kids in the suburbs. I've thought about how I would manage to put kids through school, and frankly, people like you give me hope. I really would like to put my kids through public school in the city, despite all the overblown generalizations of DC public schools, considering that I came from a crappy school system and turned out fine (I think). More power to those of you staying in Detroit to raise your families.
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Beavis1981
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Username: Beavis1981

Post Number: 157
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 3:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't know why everybody thinks suburban schools are that much better. A lot of oakland county districts only manage about 50-70% graduation rate.
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Detourdetroit
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Username: Detourdetroit

Post Number: 261
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 4:11 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

detourdetroit got (often times) better teaching at Cass Tech in the early 1990s than at an Ivy League college. detour's brother and sister got placed out of several college courses at U of M by attending Renaissance in the mid 1990s. detour liked making doughnuts in Home Economics at Lundington Middle School on NW side in the late 1980s. Public education is embattled in every major American City. It's a tragedy.
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Docmo
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Username: Docmo

Post Number: 217
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 5:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nit-picking here. Yelloweyes, you and your wife are not an empty nesters. You will be once your children have moved out of your Detroit home.
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Nyburgher
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Username: Nyburgher

Post Number: 25
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 06, 2007 - 8:24 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diversity of choices for schools would be one major benefit of living in a high density area.

One great advantage of living in a place like Manhattan or the more dense parts of NYC is that it's easy to have a big choice of schools in a small area. Magnet schools like Stuyvesant and Bronx Science have been a big reason to live in NY for years. But now, I think there is a charter school explosion. Places like Harlem have a lot of different little schools and it's easy to have choice because there are a lot of people in a small area. You can't do that in a suburb.

Detroit should come up with a few magnet schools of extreme quality and make them for residents only. Check out the old show called Fame.
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New2theeastside
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Username: New2theeastside

Post Number: 29
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 3:50 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nyburgher

Quote:
Detroit should come up with a few magnet schools of extreme quality and make them for residents only. Check out the old show called Fame.


While not elem schools, Detroit does have a host of top quality middle and high school magnet programs. I am a product of Hally Middle, there is also Bates(top 5 middle in the state), and Bagley. Everyone know about the big 3 high schools: Renaissance, Cass, and King.

I am proud to say I am a product of DPS and it hasn't been that long ago since I was there. Every large city has public school problems, Detroit is no different. There are very good, top tier schools in the City of Detroit.
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Nyburgher
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Username: Nyburgher

Post Number: 33
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 07, 2007 - 6:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry, didn't mean to insult anyone, I don't know Detroit at all. Anyway, expanding that kind of choice is important.NY's system is very uneven and there are a lot of bad schools but there are a lot of great one too.

People do move to NY to get their kids into certain schools.

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