Discuss Detroit Ľ Archives - Beginning January 2007 Ľ Wayne State Students ę Previous Next Ľ
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Fareastsider
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Username: Fareastsider

Post Number: 149
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 3:59 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Who on here is a Wayne State student? I am in the Geography/Urban Studies program myself.

(Message edited by fareastsider on February 26, 2007)
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Chitaku
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Username: Chitaku

Post Number: 1205
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:01 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

media arts/film
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Saabdriver1986
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Username: Saabdriver1986

Post Number: 386
Registered: 04-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:03 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

business and slavic studies (concentration polish) double major
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2643
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:05 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

I am in the geography program myself.
...media arts/film


And the Jeopardy question for $100 under 'W' is: Which WSU studies areas lead to unemployment or selling insurance?
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Chitaku
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Username: Chitaku

Post Number: 1206
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:08 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

the one where you work at Wal-mart
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Hans57
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Username: Hans57

Post Number: 31
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:11 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm also in the geography department, yeah I don't really have a choice but to pursue a masters in urban planning.

Are you speaking from experience livernois?
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Yelloweyes
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Username: Yelloweyes

Post Number: 90
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:15 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Quote:
"And the Jeopardy question for $100 under 'W' is"

Jeopardy doesn't have questions...they provide the answer...then the contestant provides the question.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2644
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:20 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Are you speaking from experience livernois?


Just look around at the job openings for their grads in various fields. I know a Commie Sci grad from UM-Dearborn, working at a convenience store for $7/hr, who graduated almost three years ago and never yet was interviewed in that area.

Do you really believe those softer areas have hot employment prospects? I really can't tell you...
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Everydayislikesunday
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Username: Everydayislikesunday

Post Number: 306
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:20 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

art history/history here.
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Jt1
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Username: Jt1

Post Number: 8396
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:22 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:


And the Jeopardy question for $100 under 'W' is: Which WSU studies areas lead to unemployment or selling insurance?



Or technical writing.
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Everydayislikesunday
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Username: Everydayislikesunday

Post Number: 307
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:22 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

oh, and i believe art history falls under that "future unemployment" umbrella.
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Traxus
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Username: Traxus

Post Number: 65
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:23 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Another

Media Arts/Film
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Jt1
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Username: Jt1

Post Number: 8397
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:27 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:


Just look around at the job openings for their grads in various fields. I know a Commie Sci grad from UM-Dearborn, working at a convenience store for $7/hr, who graduated almost three years ago and never yet was interviewed in that area.

Do you really believe those softer areas have hot employment prospects? I really can't tell you...



Is that indicative of the field or the State? There are many fields that have many jobs open ....in other states.

Why any new grad that is not rooted here with family obligations stays in this state is beyond me.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2645
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:36 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It may not be a good time for jobs later this year anyway, as Greenspan is today predicting a recession starting this year, helped by a falling US dollar and a collapse of the real estate market.

Maybe staying in school studying something constructive might be the way to go if jobs openings decrease.
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Patrick
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Username: Patrick

Post Number: 4093
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 4:54 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Library and Information Science
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Jt1
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Username: Jt1

Post Number: 8400
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:02 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dewey decimal system rocks!
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Track75
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Username: Track75

Post Number: 2501
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:10 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This thread is obviously anecdotal but it corresponds nicely with the news stories about a dearth of US-native students going into engineering or the hard sciences.

Where are the MEs/EEs/CEs, the Physics or Chemistry majors?

Is this why Michigan and the US are short of business-creators and long on self-actualization? Should I feel bad when I read about the difficulties recent grads are having finding good jobs? Am I turning into a grumpy old man or what?
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Dabirch
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Username: Dabirch

Post Number: 2102
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:14 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Am I turning into a grumpy old man or what?



Don't worry, I got your first drink covered at the next club meeting.
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Dannaroo
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Username: Dannaroo

Post Number: 35
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:14 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm at Wayne working on my masters in suburban planning.
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Jt1
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Username: Jt1

Post Number: 8401
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:15 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Where are the MEs/EEs/CEs, the Physics or Chemistry majors?



Part of the problem lies with the way that corporate America uses those majors. How many are middle maangers, administrators, project managers, technical writers, estimators, etc.

Many, many companies in this country shift engineers to other less technical positions as opposed to developing their engineering talent.

Engineers are also much less specialized than they used to be. How many BSE grads take the PE exam within 5 years of being out compared to years ago. The field is forcning people to have broader responsibilities and it is really hurting the ability of a company to develop and maintain expertise.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2646
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:29 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Does WSU turn out many engineers at the same level of expertise and numbers as the higher Tier colleges. US News & World Report lists WSU as a fourth-tier college, whereas other tech colleges nearby are Tier 1 through 2.

Might WSU be a college of last resort for engineering if admissions to MSU/UM were denied?

My dos centavos: EE from UW. CHem E and Accounting afterwards there.

(Message edited by LivernoisYard on February 26, 2007)
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Patrick
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Username: Patrick

Post Number: 4095
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:30 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am unsure about the lack of "tech" majors here. I will probably leave MI after graduation anyways. And no, I don't plan on having the door slam me in the ass thank you. I already gave the "tech" side a shot and it isnt for me.
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Track75
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Username: Track75

Post Number: 2502
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:34 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Don't worry, I got your first drink covered at the next club meeting.

Beam and a draft, thank you.

I was having beers and playing euchre at a small-town Elks club recently. I felt strangely at-home.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2647
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:40 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Does anybody play Sheepshead around Detroit? Many HS kids in Wisconsin, particularly the Milwaukee area played that game during lunch for money way back when. Euchre (a similar game) was the popular game in Madison and the rest of WI.
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Detroitstar
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Username: Detroitstar

Post Number: 505
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 5:54 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Social Work student here. Transferred from MSU.
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Detroit_stylin
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Username: Detroit_stylin

Post Number: 3882
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:07 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Graduate program candidate African American Studies Fall 2007
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Spitcoff
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Username: Spitcoff

Post Number: 84
Registered: 03-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:23 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

grad student physical education / health
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Thejesus
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Username: Thejesus

Post Number: 656
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:29 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

WSU Law School here
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Mackinaw
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Username: Mackinaw

Post Number: 2465
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:30 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Spent a year there recently. I'll let you know if I end up at law school there.

Majors: Econ/History.

This region needs more people with liberal arts specialties; it's these people, with cultural awareness, who will be interested in the city and in preserving what's left of it. A certain amount of high-tech people is good to have, but the hard sciences/engineering people seem to lack cultural awareness and appreciation. BROAD. SWEEPING. GENERALIZATION. Forgive me, I know it's not the case for everyone. But I take the engineering students at UM. Most of them are whiz-kids from the suburbs anyway. They go to North Campus everyday, and are surrounded by buildings and parking lots that resemble the office parks that most of them will be employed in after graduation. How many engineering/high-tech firms are located in the downtowns of midwestern cities specifically Detroit? Detroit has EDS (but its in the Ren Cen fortress easily accessed from I75). Our hopes for city proper hinge on the creative class, whatever that means, and I would not get flustered over the fact that 'not enough' people are taking hard science or engineering majors, Track75. Besides, tons of engineers in this region work for auto/auto-related firms in white collar capacities. Even white collar jobs are fleeting, clearly.
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Thejesus
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Username: Thejesus

Post Number: 657
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:30 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"I'm at Wayne working on my masters in suburban planning."

I loled
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Detroit_stylin
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Username: Detroit_stylin

Post Number: 3883
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:35 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

suburban planning...talk about an oxymoron...
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Bussey
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Username: Bussey

Post Number: 488
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:40 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is US News and World Report still in publication? I thought they quit circulating in the eighties. Oh wait, I forgot, Livernois is just still living in them!

LOL

Livernois, reading your posts reminds me of talking to my high school guidance councilor back in the day. "All the jobs that used to be good have gone to Mexico, you'll have to get a degree that matters to earn a living."

Did you ever take any classes that didn't have an instrumental purpose?

There is more to life than making widgets in the most efficient manner.

If young bucks like Fareastsider never pursued Geography or other Commie Sci degrees then things like maps would never be printed. Thereby preventing Limbaugh Losers like yourself from ever finding out where my a** is when I tell you to kiss it!

Don't be so harsh on the colleges that are responsible for starting your precious Tech Programs in the first place.

I myself have a B.A. in History, from WSU, and aside from my Management position I "use" my degree to inform philistines like yourself that the University wasn't always an institution that elevated ones credentials in the marketplace.

Originally established as an institution to refine priests, it served for years as a playground of aristocratic society. It has only recently, in the past 50+ years, become this springboard for those seeking to climb the socioeconomic ladder.

The Tier System you make note of is something that also has only formed in the past 60-50 years and is due to the creation of Tech schools and programs you tout so heavily.

The creation of tech programs and colleges, at Tier One and lower schools, has created a surge in instrumental pedagogy. Schools like Baker, Walsh, Davenport, ITT, and Phoenix have risen offering people jobs not degrees and these get rich quick marketing schemes/degrees detract from the student populations of schools like WSU and even UofM, thereby declining the level of education at all levels.

So thanks for making widgets better your whole life, but in essence you, and those who have followed in your footsteps, have just added to the philistine and Budweiser mentality that has defined this country since the advent of the G.I. Bill and tract housing.

TANKS

(Message edited by bussey on February 26, 2007)
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Wsukid
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Username: Wsukid

Post Number: 160
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:41 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

poli sci and urban studies here.
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Spaceboykelly
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Username: Spaceboykelly

Post Number: 211
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:42 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Everydayislikesunday,

I'm Art History too... [with a studio minor]

Do you use AIM? and/or what is your email address?
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Track75
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Username: Track75

Post Number: 2503
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:45 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mackinaw, spend some time in a high-tech (be it IT, biotech, whatever) region like Silicon Valley or Boston and there is a level of technical acumen that makes it much easier to create a start-up company. There's a technical and entrepreneurial culture that goes beyond "creative class" stereotypes. (BTW, Richard Florida scoops all kinds of occupations into his over-hyped "creative class" bucket, including engineers and scientists)

There will always be people who love and appreciate Detroit from backgrounds of liberal arts, technology and others. What we really need is enough money flowing through this region that those who'd consider living in a $500K loft downtown are here and not in CA or Mass.

And I think your generalization is way off the mark, and not really befitting a true liberal arts education. Then again, I was one of those North Campus types.
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Dabirch
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Username: Dabirch

Post Number: 2103
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:46 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

------------------------------ ------------------------------ --------------------
It may not be a good time for jobs later this year anyway, as Greenspan is today predicting a recession starting this year, helped by a falling US dollar and a collapse of the real estate market.



Clearly you did you even read the article?

quote:

"While, yes, it is possible we can get a recession in the latter months of 2007, most forecasters are not making that judgment and indeed are projecting forward into 2008 ... with some slowdown,"



quote:

The U.S. economy grew at a surprisingly strong 3.5 percent rate in the fourth quarter of 2006, up from a 2 percent rate in the third quarter. A survey released Monday by the National Association for Business Economics showed that experts predict economic growth of 2.7 percent this year, the slowest rate since a 1.6 percent rise in 2002.



quote:

Greenspan also said he has seen no economic spillover effects from the slowdown in the U.S. housing market.

"We are now well into the contraction period and so far we have not had any major, significant spillover effects on the American economy from the contraction in housing," he said

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Detroit_stylin
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Username: Detroit_stylin

Post Number: 3885
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:48 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OMG PLEASE dont mention Davenport again...
the sooner I am done with those consevacrites the better...

MAN I can't wait to get to Wayne State...
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Dabirch
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Username: Dabirch

Post Number: 2104
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:57 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

MAckinaw --

I am sure you were probably still in middle school during the whole dotcom era, but re-investment and growth in the urban cores of San Francisco, Manhattan, Boston, and Seattle was spurred heavily from "technology" money.

Just calling it a "Broad sweeping generalization" does not forgive somebody from uttering such a foolishly broad and sweeping statement.
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Pam
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Username: Pam

Post Number: 1109
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 6:59 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

If young bucks like Fareastsider never pursued Geography or other Commie Sci degrees then things like maps would never be printed. Thereby preventing Limbaugh Losers like yourself from ever finding out where my a** is when I tell you to kiss it!



Bussey might have a future in comedy writing.
(in other words-lol)
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Jrob53
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Username: Jrob53

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 7:17 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

BS Mechanical Engineering - 1978
BFA - Industrial Design - 1981

Worked at Ford for one year until my VW got bashed in for the third time in the most outlying parking lot.

Moved to CO where I was a product designer/engineer for 23 years. Now have offices in CO and MI (Dearborn). Business for me has never been better in MI, and I realize that I'm very fortunate.

Am now editor/publisher of a Web-based publication for mechanical designers and engineers; contributing editor for other technical publications; developer of educational/training materials for technical software vendors, resellers, and customers; design/engineering consultant; part-time snowboard instructor.

It's funny where you end up, because the school you attend is secondary compared to your goals and level of motivation in attaining those goals.

Cliche, but true.
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Mackinaw
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Username: Mackinaw

Post Number: 2468
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 7:20 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Bussey's post. I can study economic efficiency ad nauseum, but I still conclude that efficiency is not what builds the best society with the best quality of life. It's a good organizing principle, but if you take it too far its disastorous. Suburban subdivisions were built with the greatest of efficiency. Is there anything good or beautiful about them, though?


Speaking specifically about Detroit/vicinity, though, one does not hear about too many engineers or computer people who are employed in the city. I mentioned EDS, and I know that a lot of white-collar staff at the AT&T offices on Cass are engineers, but other than that, everyone I know who works in downtown/midtown is a lawyer, corporate high-up (for corporations that are still here--mainly banks), doctor, allied health care professional, professor, city worker, accountant, Detroit Tigers player, or in the service/hospitality industry. But its these groups (skilled professionals) who have the most ability to leave if they please. Yet they are interested enough in the institution that is Detroit to stay and work here.

I am ever-optimistic about development projects in Detroit, but if there's one that I would call a little over-ambitious, it's TechTown. Something tells me that a gritty, old industry setting in 'a city whose time has passed' (as some would have it) will not attract employers and entrepreneurs who are all about new, new, new.

(Message edited by mackinaw on February 26, 2007)
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The_nerd
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Username: The_nerd

Post Number: 407
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 7:38 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Commie-Sci"

LY, that couldn't be further from the truth! There are many "leftists" in the PS departments, but to balance them there are also active right-wingers. In my experience, the professors whose personal politics trump their professionalism tend to be in English departments.

Your "commie-sci" comment does disservice to right-wingers such as Condi and Dick Cheney. Sitting here in law school, not only do I see the history/PS/English types, but there is also a very large number of people with various engineering degrees (some with Ph.D's) from schools ranked higher than Wisconsin. Ever hear of the "Patent Bar"
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Danny
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Username: Danny

Post Number: 5574
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 8:00 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Media arts and studies.

YAY WSU!!!
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Lowell
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Username: Lowell

Post Number: 3704
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 8:28 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good point Jrob, about 'funny where you end up'. What one studies in college and does in life is often quite unrelated. One is best to learn to have broad knowledge and be flexible in this era of fast moving knowledge and business.

I attended WSU grad school with a tuition-free scholarship until I quit school forever to be an artist. Then I drove truck and delivered refrigerators and appliances for seven years. Oh yeah, I had a liberal arts undergrad degree with a major in 'commie sci'. I guess that makes me chopped liver, but I can't help notice that this discussion is not occurring on LY's forum.

WSU is a great school. Its special edge is its setting in heart of Detroit, with all its realism and issues, amid a thriving art community and surrounded by great cultural institutions. This gives WSU the best ~total~ educational environment in the midwest. Even a place as impressive as Ann Arbor looks like a protective hick town by comparison.

Education amid real life issues is, IMO, at least as important as what is learned in the classroom.

As for those who sneer at the study of geography, we need look no further that at the current occupant of the White House to see the trillion dollar consequences the lack of geographical and social science knowledge can bring.
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Bussey
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Username: Bussey

Post Number: 489
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Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 8:48 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bump Lowell.
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Mackinaw
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Username: Mackinaw

Post Number: 2472
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 9:07 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lowell, if Wayne had even 40 percent of its students living on campus, then it would give a total educational environment. You get to know way more people from around the country and world in Ann Arbor, and the more people you meet in these years the better. I love Detroit, and Wayne being in Detroit was my favorite thing about it, but I couldn't do undergraduate work at WSU because it wasn't 'total' enough for me, even with a lot of really good professors.

Wayne could be amazing with three small tweaks:
1) get a critical mass of on-campus students, enough such that it becomes a 24 hour zone with at least a few places that resemble college-town institutions i.e. bars and clubs near campus.
2) hype the freaking sports...get people together...build an arena on campus.
3) Take admissions criteria up just the slightest notch so that Wayne gets on to the top 100 lists where it belongs. Tier 3 just doesn't attract out-of-state students, but you would get an instant boost in midtown population if you get people who don't have the option to commute to go to Wayne. You can only do this by building regional/national respect, even if it is just 'image.' Unfortunately when I shared my ideas with some administrators, they snapped back at me with some rhetoric about "accessibility."
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Detroitplanner
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Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 1024
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 9:08 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

<-- did undergrad at Wayne, co-majored in Geography and Urban Studies. Back then Geography was in Lib Arts and Urban Studies was in the College of Urban, Labor, and Metropolitan Affairs.

Going to Wayne was one of the best experiences I've had. I ended up there after realizing that pursuing my degree in architecture would not make me obtain my goals. The program fit what I wanted to do perfectly.
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Track75
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Username: Track75

Post Number: 2505
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Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 9:13 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A good liberal arts degree is a valuable thing. It is also, today, a relatively rare thing. Some universities just aren't up to the task but more commonly the student doesn't seek out coursework of adequate breadth and rigor. A good liberal arts grad has excellent reasoning and communication skills backed up by broad knowledge.

There's way too much fluff on campus that can be consumed for four years and then claimed to represent a liberal arts education when in fact the grad lacks knowledge, reasoning and communicative ability.

Engineering and science grads may lack a broad academic knowledge base but they've mastered a very rigorous and analytical curriculum.

A couple comments above that mention "making widgets more efficiently" as a way of putting down engineering and business eduction are hopefully just a little internet repartee. If seriously held, they demonstrate a liberal arts education with a rather large void in the area that dealt with technology and business, important facets of modern life that educated people ought to understand better.
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Bussey
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Username: Bussey

Post Number: 490
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Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 10:55 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Vice Versa.

And yes, you did sense a slight amount of sarcasm in my post.
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Pistonian_revolution
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Username: Pistonian_revolution

Post Number: 77
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 11:15 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

im an english/urban studies major.

hey, do any of you geography/urban planners happen to be in my urban planning class with tony brinkman on monday/wednesdays?
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Detroite
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Username: Detroite

Post Number: 7
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 11:49 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Urban Studies & Polish lang.
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Fareastsider
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Username: Fareastsider

Post Number: 153
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 12:14 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

yea im in Brinkmans class as well as another guy who was asking about the planning commission meetings I dont remember his name though
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Wsugrad
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Username: Wsugrad

Post Number: 21
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 12:34 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Go Tartars...I mean WARRIORS!

I love Wayne State. 2 degrees (BA, MA) and 60K debt! More importantly - I moved here when I was 18 - and I grew to LOVE this city.
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Rustic
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Username: Rustic

Post Number: 3080
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 2:34 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When discussing universities one must look at the mission of each school and compare it to its peer group. Michigan residents remain fortunate in having 3 large state R1 universities which nicely compliment each other in their missions: State, UofM and Wayne.

State is an ok general purpose big land grant Ag school with a broad academic program. Many states make do with a single big state school comparable to Michigan State. Michiganders can also opt for two other good complimentary choices.

UofM is in the top 5 or 6 elite state universities nationwide which ain't too shabby. In terms of strict academics it is IMO in the top 2 or 3 with Berkeley and, maybe, Virginia; but these two schools, and a few other very good state schools (Texas, UCLA, and maybe Wisconsin) do a much better job of serving the people of their respective states so I'd rank Michigan overall behind them ... but 5 or 6 nationwide ain't bad for a state like Michigan that has been suffering middle class brain drain for over 40 years.

Wayne is one of the best of the nation's urban commuter R1's in accomplishing its mission. It compares quite favorably to its peer institutions in terms of the breadth of its programs (comps include Illinois Chicago Circle, Cal State SF, City Univ of New York, American University, UT-Dallas, Cleveland State ...), off hand I'd say that only Cincinnati compares favorably to Wayne.

I went to WSU and I am gainfully employed in a profession directly related to my field of undergraduate study. My professional peers typically have super deluxe brand name pedigrees and I ain't complaining one bit about what I got outta Wayne State. Yay Detroit!

(Message edited by rustic on February 27, 2007)
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Mallory
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Username: Mallory

Post Number: 83
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 8:33 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Radio & TV. I went to school with Dave Zoran. I forget what station he works at now.

I'll never forget day one in Radio Production class. Professor Logan. Mean old crotchety prick. Taught Marconi radio he was so old. He looks around the room, starts talking about the class and says...

"Personally, I feel that women do not belong in radio, but the state says I have to teach you."

I kid you not. That was 1982.

Go Tartars!
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Ordinary
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Username: Ordinary

Post Number: 139
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 9:34 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Graduated from Wayne State with a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies. I think that's a fancy name for a General Studies degree. I wanted to get a bachelor's degree so I could show my little brother with the receding hair line and the high forehead. They took all my credits from Macomb and proclaimed me a junior. I enjoyed it a lot. The professors were great. It kind of turned me into a heathen but then again I think a good education is supposed to challenge your beliefs.

Q. How do you get a graduate from the Interdisciplinary Studies program off your porch?

A. Pay him for the pizza!
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Warriorfan
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Username: Warriorfan

Post Number: 661
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 9:42 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Who on here is a Wayne State student? I am in the Geography/Urban Studies program myself.




Is Sauerzopf still teaching Intro Urban Studies? His tests were in essay form and it's not fun to have to write a bunch of mini-essays at 9:30 in the morning when you have a time limit.
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Thejesus
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Username: Thejesus

Post Number: 663
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 9:55 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Do/have all of you Urban Planning majors work for the city for the most part? Are there other lines of work common for people with these majors?
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Mdoyle
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Username: Mdoyle

Post Number: 33
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 10:18 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

undergrad. BFA photography
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Penelopetheduck
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Username: Penelopetheduck

Post Number: 4
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 10:55 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm very, very slowly working a master's in urban planning. I work for a non-profit that runs service learning programs in high schools.
I think the adage about liberal arts degrees being worthless is a myth, or at least a serious misinterpretation. My BA in English didn't set me up with a high-powered job straight out of college, but I don't know many people with technical degrees who got great jobs right after graduation either. I've found that a lot of companies value a specific college degree a lot less than they value experience in the field.
I also know that my degree, and especially the fact that I went to a small liberal arts college that specialized in writing, has help get me good jobs and promotions.
For other urban planning students: Have any of you taken George Galster's classes? I adore him. He's hands-down one of the best professors I've ever had.
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Malcovemagnesia
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Username: Malcovemagnesia

Post Number: 12
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 11:07 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've been so ashamed of my WSU Masters degree (in computer science) that I've never taken it out of the envelope.

Seriously.

And I'm very thankful to be well employed, but this has been due to my work experience before and after finishing my degree. In employment interviews or on the job, the subject of my time at Wayne State has never been broached.

That university has got its work cut out for it, if it ever wants to be thought of as world class.

(Message edited by MalcoveMagnesia on February 27, 2007)
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Arcas
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Username: Arcas

Post Number: 16
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 11:20 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'll sign in too...

Current grad. student.

College of Engineering.
Masters of Science in Alternative Energy Technology.
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Stryker81
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Username: Stryker81

Post Number: 22
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 11:53 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a question for anyone who is in the Urban Planning program. How difficult or selective to get into that program? I will be graduating in the next year and that is a career path I have been thinking about. I have read the requirements for admission and they seem to be very selective. The problem with myself is that I have had a less than stellar academic record in the past (especially at my years at Macomb Community College) although at Wayne I have been able to keep the GPA around the 3.0 mark. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
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Traxus
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Username: Traxus

Post Number: 69
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 12:18 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jobs are going to be hard to come by regardless of your degree. Its sort of depressing, but I sometimes look at my Bachelors (in progress) as a highschool diploma v2.0. Granting me access to the next level of employment (whatever jobs follow the burger joints and line jobs).

I'm still cleaning up my general education garbage though, so maybe I'm just naive.
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Thejesus
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Username: Thejesus

Post Number: 667
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 12:24 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Malcovemagnesia:

Some posters are undoubtedly gonna sh*t on you for your comment above, but what you said has some truth to it...the engineering and computer science programs at WSU are not well respected programs at all...

I have two friends who work as engineers for a prominent automotive supplier in Dearborn which hires most of its engineers and programmers from U of M Dearborn, and my buddy told me that when his supervisor is looking through resumes of entry level graduates, he just tosses the WSU people in the trash because they often require a lot more on -he-job training before they are up to par with grads of other schools...
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Bvos
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Username: Bvos

Post Number: 2113
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 12:32 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm a current MUP student.

The MUP (Masters of Urban Planning) program at Wayne is an outstanding program IMO. UM and MSU might have the programs that make the headlines with their splashy and flashy projects, but often these projects result in the client rolling their eyes after the lights and cameras have left and it gets put on the shelf with the rest of the ridiculously unfeasible projects. EMU also has an MUP program but it's not accredited.

Every WSU student project I've been a part of has resulted in the client (a city, county, regional government, etc.) implementing the vast majority of what the project recommended. WSU's MUP program produces urban planners with a keen ability to get past the hype, look beyond the flavor of the day planning trends, cut the crap and get down to the nuts and bolts of creating real projects for real people with real budgets.

WSU's MUP program is designed for working professionals. I currently work in planning and apply what I learn in my classes on a daily basis. You don't have to be working in the planning field to start the MUP program, but it's highly recommended that you find a planning job within a year of starting the program. The classroom discussions and class projects, because of the working professionals in them, are great because the students and professors are able to pose challenging questions and get challenging responses based on the real world.

No offense to UM, EMU or MSU, but most of the MUP grads I've met from there have a very hard time integrating planning theory with real world scenarios and visa versa (ie. the fact that there are politics, severe budget constraints, etc. in the planning world). They also have a very hard time transitioning from the classroom to the real world and face a steep learning curve when it comes to actually working a real live planning job.

The MUP program at Wayne isn't terribly selective. They're more interested in students who not only can hack graduate level work but also think critically about the multi-disciplinary aspects of planning. I've found that they're willing to put someone on a one semester or one year probationary period if it appears that their professional experience and/or interests line up with the planning field. Some very non-traditional students have done very well in the MUP program, others have struggled with the program and had to drop out. The program currently has students with undergrads in religious studies, English, interior design and other non-traditional backgrounds who are all doing extremely well. Many students had very high undergrad GPAs, others didnít and are doing very well.
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Dannaroo
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Username: Dannaroo

Post Number: 36
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 12:43 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Stryker81:

I am currently in the urban planning program. I don't think its as selective as the requirements make it sound; when it came down to admitting me, I think they placed a lot more emphasis on my previous work experience (and career goals), letters of recommendation, and personal interview.

Before you do make the decision to go to WSU for a graduate degree in Urban Planning, make sure you do your homework and know that this is the type of education you want to focus on. As far as graduate programs in Michigan go, WSU has a very heavy focus on policy (and to a lesser degree economics), MSU seems to focus on the environment, landscape, and ecology, EMU has a large focus on geography and cartography, (IMO, both EMU and MSU have much better GIS programs than WSU), and UofM focuses on architecture/preservation (and has some good options to also study real estate, law, or policy at the same time).
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2648
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 2:00 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Many students had very high undergrad GPAs, others didnít and are doing very well.


Understandable... Massive GPA inflation most everywhere (colleges first, then high schools, etc.) has rendered the GPA systems today generally useless. Back during the late 1960s, college grades were raised to keep poor-performing students from getting onto probation and eventual expulsion from colleges. Year after year, the GPA standards have slipped more and more until the current meaningless metric is what it is now.

Harvard had to finally stop allowing AP scores of 3 or 4--now need 5s there due to the massive "GPA" inflation resulting from the AP scoring also. Yet many schools, including some (most or all?) in MI, still allow AP scores of 3.

(Message edited by LivernoisYard on February 27, 2007)
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Eastsidedog
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Username: Eastsidedog

Post Number: 920
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 2:35 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wayne State Alumni. BFA with concentration in Graphic Design. Gainfully and happily employed for 7 years in my field.

Personally the I think the fight for more math and science in US schools is silly. I heard somewhere that currently Chinese and Indian colleges graduate 5 times more engineering students than US colleges. I would like to think that we can catch up but it seems like that opportunity has passed. I think the US will continue to emerge as the the entertainment capital of the world in the 21st Century. We need more applied art education to further cement our dominance in the entertainment field. But still dumb administrators continue the slash art programs. Idiots!
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2649
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 2:43 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The Chinese annually graduate over 600,000 engineers of various quality. The US engineering colleges graduate about 75,000 per year, of which only 32,000 are Americans. India, whose population now exceeds China, also graduates muchos engineeros, and they speak English--so to speak...

Another factoid, there are more English-speaking Chinese in China than there are Canadians and Americans in the total US and Canadian population.
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Bvos
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Username: Bvos

Post Number: 2114
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 2:52 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dannaroo,

I've found that the EMU program focuses on preservation far more than UM. In fact EMU's MUP program has a National Trust approved track on preservation. UM's program may talk about reusing historic buildings, but rarely is it along preservation lines. It's about making an old building have some modern flair rather than historic rehabilitation as they emphasise at EMU.

EMU's program is also technical focused. It's meant for students to walk into a planning job and be able to start doing site plan reviews from day one. However the theory behind many of the zoning ordinances planners are asked to enforce doesn't seem to be emphasized like it is at WSU.

UM's program is very focused on design (which is why it's part of the school of architecture) which can be good except when design is seen as the only tool in the tool box. Regional development and planning is also a big part of the UM program.

MSU's program is indeed focused on environment, ecology and landscape, but state level policy is becoming a bigger and bigger part of the program as the Land Policy Institute begins to work closer and closer with the program.

Stryker81 I'd definately make sure urban planning is what you want to get into as a profession as Dannaroo said. It's a professional degree program designed for a specific set of jobs rather than a liberal arts style general education. While it can be useful in a number of professions, it's a lot of money to spend if you aren't going to go in the urban planning field.

Penelopetheduck, I haven't had a Galster class yet and unfortunately I likely won't due to my concentration (Managing Regional Growth). However he's the most high profile professor and researcher in the GUP dept. He's a real treasure for WSU and Detroit.
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Fareastsider
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Username: Fareastsider

Post Number: 162
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 3:30 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Go Warriors!


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Christos
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Username: Christos

Post Number: 64
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 4:31 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm a part time student in the MAIR (Master of Arts in Industrial Relations) program. I LOVE it! The professors have been top notch, and I've been told its one of the top 4 labor dept's in the nation (the other four being U of Ill., MSU, Cornell).
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Mountainman
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Username: Mountainman

Post Number: 129
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 4:45 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Question about WSU's grad program in English Lit/Creative Writing. I exploring grad school options right now, and just was seeing what student opinions there were about the program.
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Patrick
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Username: Patrick

Post Number: 4103
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 4:52 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Everyone talks about the massive number of engineering grads in China but what they don't take into account is the poor quality of those degrees.
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Dannaroo
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Username: Dannaroo

Post Number: 38
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 5:07 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Penelopetheduck:

I have a class with Galster this semester. I agree with both you and BVOS that he is definitely a great professor and one of the most knowledgable that I have ever encountered at any level of my education.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2650
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 5:51 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

Everyone talks about the massive number of engineering grads in China but what they don't take into account is the poor quality of those degrees.


The jury is out and there is no verdict on that count. The Chinese could say the very same about the US engineering graduates in a country that routinely ranks in the bottom two or three out of some two dozen industrial countries in both math and physics and most other academics, too...

Take notice that four foreign students on student visas in the US receive engineering degrees at US universities for every three Americans. I have worked with some of these students over the decades and find that they typically rank near the top of their classes in the Engineering College at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I studied both chemical and electrical engineering and found that their superior ranking compared to US natives applies to both engineering fields.

Also, a large percentage of the professors at US engineering institutions are foreigners and have been since the 1970s, probably even earlier.

(Message edited by LivernoisYard on February 27, 2007)
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Jeduncan
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Username: Jeduncan

Post Number: 40
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 8:15 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm in the Geography/Urban Planning program as well...

you do know that next year you'll be able to declare Urban Studies as your major without having to burden yourself with the co-major, right?
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Hans57
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Username: Hans57

Post Number: 32
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 8:24 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, Justin that was my plan for next year. The two majors are almost interchangeable as I understand it.
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Stryker81
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Username: Stryker81

Post Number: 23
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 9:02 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the insight Dannaroo and Bvos, I appreciate it. I have been researching this field and the kind of work it pertains to recently, and I find it to be very interesting. As I mentioned before, I have about a year until I get my bachelors (History), so I have some time to think it over some more. I think it would be useful to start seeing if I can find some sort of job in that field first, being that I am 25 years old and only really have experience in retail. We will see. Thanks again!
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Jeduncan
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Username: Jeduncan

Post Number: 41
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 9:12 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hans, I didn't know you were an urban studies guy. kick ass! Thus far you're 1 of two forumers I know for sure are in one of my classes... the other is in my Planning class, but has not yet identified themselves as being on here.

will mystery person in US/GPH 3530 please step forward?
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Jeduncan
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Username: Jeduncan

Post Number: 42
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 9:13 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

by the way...

what the hell is our mascot?
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Patrick
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Username: Patrick

Post Number: 4109
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 9:38 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kinda sucks that no teacher will let me use them for a reference for a possible internship.
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Craig
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Username: Craig

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 10:00 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

poli sci. I went to Henry Ford for a while and one prof told me to look at liberal arts as aspring board. I sure don"t and probably never will work in politics, but you learn skills that will help you whip past a lot of the people in biz and the hard sciences.
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East_detroit
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Username: East_detroit

Post Number: 990
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 10:13 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

grad student, cognitive science: computer science + cognitive psychology + linguistics
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Lowell
Board Administrator
Username: Lowell

Post Number: 3706
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 1:00 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's your competition kids:

http://www.scottmcleod.org/did youknow.wmv
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Fareastsider
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Username: Fareastsider

Post Number: 164
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 7:58 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am in gph 3530 also alot of people have that and Brinkmans class. I have identified myself, I started the thread.
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Jeduncan
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Username: Jeduncan

Post Number: 43
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 10:30 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

lol okay. Then I'll see you in class.
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Col_kat
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Username: Col_kat

Post Number: 7
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 3:57 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am an engineer that must agree with JT1's comment

"Part of the problem lies with the way that corporate America uses those majors. How many are middle mangers, administrators, project managers, technical writers, estimators, etc."

I am bored out of my mind with corporate america and my job in general. Being apart of the stupid rat race is not what life is suppose to be about. I will be going to Wayne State this fall getting my Masters in Urban Planning.

While I was growing up my parents encouraged me to go to school, get good grades, an pick a major that would pay me well so I could retire and live comfortably on my pension and ssi and my 401k but hell my company has taken the pension away, there probably won't be any ssi. Take on top of that the stupid corporate stuff I have to deal with. I just don't see it as the way anymore. If everybody in America wants to go into the liberal arts let them. Math and science isn't for everybody. Actually I don't think its for most people. Your talents will make away.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2656
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 4:37 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As with any field of employment, there are only so many jobs. If large numbers of students want to be employed in urban planning, there has to be a job market for large numbers of them. Otherwise, unemployment looms...

The BLS has this to say about the field:
quote:

Job Outlook

Employment of urban and regional planners is expected to grow about as fast as average for all occupations through 2014. Employment growth will be driven by the need for State and local governments to provide public services such as regulation of commercial development, the environment, transportation, housing, and land use and development for an expanding population. Nongovernmental initiatives dealing with historic preservation and redevelopment will provide additional openings. Some job openings also will arise from the need to replace experienced planners who transfer to other occupations, retire, or leave the labor force for other reasons. Graduates with a masterís degree from an accredited program should have an advantage in the job market.

Most new jobs for urban and regional planners will be in local government, as planners will be needed to address an array of problems associated with population growth, especially in affluent, rapidly expanding communities. For example, new housing developments require roads, sewer systems, fire stations, schools, libraries, and recreation facilities that must be planned for in the midst of a consideration of budgetary constraints. Small-town chambers of commerce, economic development authorities, and tourism bureaus may hire planners, preferably with some background in marketing and public relations.

The fastest job growth for urban and regional planners will occur in the private sector, primarily in professional, scientific, and technical services. For example, planners may be employed by these firms to help design security measures for a building that meet a desired security level, but that also are subtle and blend in with the surrounding area. However, because the private sector employs fewer than 2 out of 10 urban and regional planners, not as many new jobs will be created in the private sector as in government.


Earnings

Median annual earnings of urban and regional planners were $53,450 in May 2004. The middle 50 percent earned between $41,950 and $67,530. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $33,840, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $82,610. Median annual earnings in local government, the industry employing the largest number of urban and regional planners, were $52,520.


Related Occupations

Urban and regional planners develop plans for the growth of urban, suburban, and rural communities. Others whose work is similar include architects, civil engineers, environmental engineers, landscape architects, and geographers.


Urban planner employment in MI shouldn't amount to much if the states retrenches its public-sector workforce, and Metro Detroit would be even harder pressed with providing jobs for more workers in this field.
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Swbaby12345
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Username: Swbaby12345

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 8:05 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

WSU Pharmacy!
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Christos
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Username: Christos

Post Number: 67
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 8:19 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think our mascot is a late 70's vision of a post-apocalypitic coney island street gang leader.
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Soulsauce
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Username: Soulsauce

Post Number: 186
Registered: 05-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:29 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Masters of Library and Information Science.

Graduated last year, but still taking classes. I'm a sucker for punishment it seems.
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Gertrude
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Username: Gertrude

Post Number: 26
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 2:13 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Proud WSU undergrad majoring in Econ. I think many of the big problems (env, preservation) can be addressed if we start adding in the social costs to total costs and finding mechanisms to address them.

I think true efficiency is when optimal amount produced reflects all the costs and benefits.
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Courtney
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Username: Courtney

Post Number: 122
Registered: 06-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 2:16 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

English.

When I first started there in Winter of 2000, I was forever being looked at as if I had an extra head since I was a transfer from Loyola New Orleans and content with the painful out of state tuition rate.

I'd pay to take another class with Rich Sauerzopf. Even if it was at 8am on a Saturday morning. And even if he pulled another "lets walk" on us. Reuther library to Mariner's church and running back to not be late for our next class in shoes not good for walking was an experience, to say the least.

If anyone gets the chance to take anything with Laura Kline (Slavic dept), Cat Yampell (I think she was working on her doctorate in English when I had her) or Kenneth Jackson (English dept), sign up. They were by far the best of the best.
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Malcovemagnesia
Member
Username: Malcovemagnesia

Post Number: 16
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 3:12 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wow Gertrude. The eloquent utilization of your enlarged lexicon demonstrates you are indeed in college, but could you dumb down those 2 dollar word sentences for me to understand?
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Gertrude
Member
Username: Gertrude

Post Number: 30
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 10:31 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Malcovemagnesia - I'm assuming you are being sarcastic since there really isn't any jargon in that post that wouldn't also show up in a general article. However, I would be glad to recommend a good dictionary if you so need it.

Courtney - Unfortunately, I transfered in all my English credits but I have always loved a good English teacher.
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Dede313
Member
Username: Dede313

Post Number: 14
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 11:17 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I plan on attending WSU next year, majoring in education.Is it expensive? Oh is there any programs for students who want to go into fashion?
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Everydayislikesunday
Member
Username: Everydayislikesunday

Post Number: 309
Registered: 12-2004
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 11:45 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

spaceboykelly: my email is au2625 at wayne.
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Jeduncan
Member
Username: Jeduncan

Post Number: 45
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 04, 2007 - 11:39 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dede313, nah. it's not expensive -- I mean, it's gonna be more than community college, but it's a lot more reasonable than, say, MSU, and UofM. You get a good value for what you pay, too.

and yes. There's a program for fashion design there, I know a few people in it.

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