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Milwaukee
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Username: Milwaukee

Post Number: 882
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 12:38 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi everybody, I'm beginning to look seriously at colleges. My college planner told me that Detroit Mercy has an architecture program. Architecture is what I plan on studying in college. I don't know too much if anything about the school, but I'm still interested. I don't think I'll have a problem getting in, my grades are good.

Are there any students here? What is the campus like? The neighborhood? Most importantly is the architecture school good?

Thanks for your help.
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 234
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:03 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Milwaukee,

The Dean of the School of Architecture is a fellow named Steve Vogel. Get the University's phone number off the web site (www.udmercy.edu) and ask for him. One thing I know about UDM is the Deans are approachable; he won't mind you calling. Ask for a campus visit.

I know several architects that graduated from U of D (before they added the M) and seem pleased with what they learned.

With regard to the campus, it is about 70 acres and is an actual campus; the buildings do not exist mixed in among the neighborhood like WSU. The neighborhood north of campus is upper middle class and kind of pricey; the neighborhood south of campus is lower middle class and has some urban-neighborhood problems. West and east are kind of in between.

There are dormitories on campus but not much of a "student ghetto" off campus; in fact the off campus business district seems to ignore the existence of the University. (The U of D Coney does a good bit of student business, though. Tell Dino that Professor Scott says hello.)

Though many students ignore this fact, UDM is one of the better transit-service locations in the City. There are four bus lines that pass directly by the campus and another one a block to the south. Having said that, though, if you are going to school anywhere in metro Detroit, best to have a car handy.

Good luck with this - if you post further questions I will try to get you further answers. I know many people at Detroit Mercy.

Professor Scott
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Jasoncw
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Username: Jasoncw

Post Number: 350
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:10 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The three architecture schools in South East Michigan are the University of Michigan, Lawrence Tech, and University of Detroit Mercy. I also think that's the order of their architectural street cred too.

U of M is more theory based, and Lawrence Tech is more "hands on," although both are good all around.

I think Lawrence Tech's undergrad program is integrated into all 4 years while U of M's is a normal 2 year thing. If you went to U of M, you'd be doing gen eds and pre-architecture for your first two years, and then another two years of actual architecture classes. At Lawrence Tech it's mixed together.

Lawrence Tech is a commuter school with a few dorms on it, and from what I saw, it would not be fun to live there at all. The campus is bordered by 10 mile and the freeway, and the campus itself is mostly parking lots with a few clusters of buildings. The program is good, but studying architecture in such an environment is too ironic for me.

Lawrence Tech is also a smaller technical school. If you decided you didn't want to do architecture they might not have the other major you want to do.

U of M's campus is really nice, although it's also big.

I've never been to UDM. From the people who went there I hear that the campus is fine. It is a Christan (Catholic?) university, so there will be some theology classes, and I'd figure that a lot of the people who go there are devout.


If a college advertises "Pre-Architecture," ignore it. Pre-Architecture basically means your math and science and arts and other gen-eds that you can get at any university you go to. Just check the course equivalencey guides to make sure that your classes will transfer to the school that you want to end up at.

And talk to a lot of admissions counselors.


Good luck! :-)
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7even
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Username: 7even

Post Number: 129
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:12 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Currently I am in my 4th year of the architecture program at UDM. I know of a few more 4th years that also visit the forum frequently.

The Campus is nice and compact, so everyone walks to their classes. There is not much to do on or in the area immediately around campus. If you are coming to party do not come to UDM. I donít party, but some people do and they rather drive to a bigger college instead of stay for the frat parties that are just off of campus. Game rooms and intramural sports are about the extent of the entertainment.

The architecture program is very excellent and well organized. It has been ranked high in certain Midwest polls for architecture schools. It has a great mix of math/science and theory. Also, most of the teachers are very intelligent and insightful. I have really enjoyed it and it has also helped me get some decent jobs.

There are a few bad points about UDM.
-the cost, I heard it is the most expensive school in Michigan.
-the food is not very good. It makes you smell and have the shits.
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 3706
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:22 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I got my M.S. from the UDM Business School, and my B.S. from Mercy College (before they merged). Yes it is a Catholic University, but a religion class requirement can be satisfied with a Business Ethics or a Medical Ethics class.

I took the Medical Ethics class because "business ethics" is an oxymoron! :-)
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 236
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:23 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jason,

UDM is owned by two orders of Catholic religious but it is a University and not a Church. Nobody is required to study "theology", and the people I know from there are devout beer drinkers first and foremost. (As, for the record, am I.)
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Barnesfoto
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Username: Barnesfoto

Post Number: 3090
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:27 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

One of the best Architecture Schools in the country:
http://www.sciarc.edu/
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 237
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:28 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

7even,

You eat the University food?! For shame. Hie your ass over to the U of D Coney. The food is cheaper, no more unhealthy than the on-campus crap (and on-campus food is crap everywhere), and tastes good.

I doubt UDM is the most expensive school in Michigan, incidentally. Few pay the rack rate anyhow. Go independent of the 'rents ASAP to get the best financial aid; then every college is roughly equally expensive.

Help our friend out and post Steve Vogel's phone number so he doesn't have to look it up. I don't know the new numbers; I was around U of D when the campus didn't have Centrex and the number was UNiversity 2-1000. (Charles Kent Reaver, the diamond merchant who advertised with the slogan "just dial DIA-MOND" for years, was a neighbor.)
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 3707
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:32 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, those would be the Jesuits and the Sisters of Mercy, although ironically the first president of the combined school in 1990 (Sister Maureen Fay) was a Dominican! (At least I assume "Maureen Fay, OP" meant that.)

Professorscott, is Dan Shoemaker still a professor of Computer Science in the business school? I spent 3 summers at Warnborough and Westminster Colleges in Oxford England (via a UDM summer course program there), and Dr. Shoemaker was there with us.
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7even
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Username: 7even

Post Number: 130
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:37 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Phone number for the School of Architecture is 1-313-993-1532.

Ya, I don't pay full price. I got an alright scholarship. I am also an R.A., so I get free room and board.
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 239
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:44 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Gistok,

Dan has been around UDM (and UD before that) for a long time and is still there. The program is called "Computer Information Systems"; "Computer Science" is taught by the College of Engineering and Science and is a bit different.

And yes, Sister Fay is a Dominican.

7even, which dorm do you assist the residents of?
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7even
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Username: 7even

Post Number: 131
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:49 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Shiple, I get to hang out with the freshmen.
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 241
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:58 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Does the elevator work this week :-)

Back when Detroit had the firestorm every Devil's Night, Shiple was the place to watch the action. Thankfully, that's pretty much behind us now.
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7even
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Username: 7even

Post Number: 132
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 2:00 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Only a handful of people have been stuck in the trusty elevators this year. I opt to take the stairs.

(Message edited by 7even on March 01, 2007)
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6nois
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Username: 6nois

Post Number: 65
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 2:42 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am a freshman at UDM in architecture. The program is great, I have learned alot, and I like the fact that you get to jump into architecture in your first year unlike at U of M. The school is fairly design and art based but has the technical side too. A pretty good mix as far as I am concerned. I really like it. I am thinking of getting a minor in Digital Media Studies. I really can't complain that much, the food isn't great on campus, but you will survive. As for extra stuff to do, once you get into architecture it kinda becomes your life, as I type this from studio right now. Props to the RA I should probably head back to Shiple to sleep.
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Udmphikapbob
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Username: Udmphikapbob

Post Number: 278
Registered: 07-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 8:57 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A couple of positives about the program not yet mentioned: you get a Masters after 5 years, instead of going back for 2 years somewhere else; and also the new Community Development program. Spend some time on the website: www.udmercy.edu

I turned down a full-ride to Lawrence to take a half-tuition scholarship at UDM. I lived on campus for 5 years (West Quad, muthaf**kers!), and as some of the other posters may recognize from my name, I was part of the small Greek scene. I still have a very tight circle of friends from UDM that I would not have formed commuting to LTU.

Campus life is what you make of it - we had fun!

The neighborhood is getting better, but there is nothing as far as a college atmosphere off-campus. Ferndale is a short drive, as is downtown, of course.

The school is very good. You will get a well-rounded, complete education. You will have to take a couple of religion classes, but they are not preachy-types. I had one on "sexuality and love"! You also have the benefit of division I basketball - even though we sucked it hard this season...

Good luck...you'll need it!

Phi Kap Bob - B.Arch '00 / M.Arch '06
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Homer
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Username: Homer

Post Number: 92
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 9:10 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mercy grad here, 1972. Health Management.
Minority arch link below.

http://www.noma.net/local/
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Rsa
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Username: Rsa

Post Number: 1034
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 10:30 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i finished my education in the school of architecture, UDM in 2002. the last time the aia ranked architecture schools in the country (i think it was before 2000), UDM SOA ranked in the top five.

it is an excellent, well rounded program. the classes are much more personal and student oriented: class sizes are never larger than thirty and it will not be unusual to know them by their first name and have their cell number. i enjoyed the education and teachers so much that i stayed another year to get a degree in another field. i also had the opportunity to study and live in france for a summer and italy for another summer, thru the program.

i will give you the same speech that i give everyone thinking about going into architecture: you have to love it. by the time of graduation between 60-75% of the people you entered into the program with will have dropped architecture. it is one of the toughest programs you can take. you will spend days on end in your design studio working on a project. frequently. and when you graduate you will make towards the bottom of the payscale abd be treated thusly (typically). so the rumors of fame, power and wealth that come with an architecture degree are greatly unsubstantiated. but, if you love it, then you get to enjoy most days at work.

the architecture program is one of (if not the) most expensive programs in the state. but don't let that dissuade you; UDM offers many scholarships and reasonable financing plans.

the campus is alright. student life is minimal, with most people leaving campus for majority of their entertainment (ie. downtown). but it is pretty and walkable. you can get around without a car, but it makes life significantly easier if you have one.

my understanding of the architecture schools in michigan are: on a scale of creative/artistic vs. technical, cranbrook (altho not accredtited, it is world renowned) is the most artistic based, UDM, UofM, and larry tech would be the most technically oriented. i have been warned by some people that graduated from UofM's program that it tends to rest on it's laurels and reputation quite a bit. so, in my opinion, UDM has the best program in the state.

UDM also offers two programs in architecture: a bachelors of science in architecture, which is a four year, non-accredited program and the five year accredited master's degree. (altho the last should be considered 6 year, because you don't get a summer off after your second year-due to coop's, etc.)

hope this helps. good luck!
-RSA (rockstarchitect)
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Valkyrias
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Username: Valkyrias

Post Number: 441
Registered: 02-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 10:42 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i was wondering when you were gonna chip in, rsa :-)

i also went to udm, not for architecture though...but perhaps the one thing i can comment on is all the religious and catholic talk going on. if that is an issue for you, i can assure you it shouldn't be. many colleges require you to take some form of religious studies class, and not all the religious studies classes at udm are based in catholicism. and i would guess that most of the people who attend the school are not catholic.

however, if you are looking for a catholic education, you can certainly find it there. that's what i liked about udm, you knew it was catholic, but you weren't really reminded of that on a daily basis, unless it was something you sought out personally.
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Rsa
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Username: Rsa

Post Number: 1036
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 11:29 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

hee hee; valky and i met when i went into that second degree.

i concur about the religious aspect. it is a catholic university, but you wouldn't know it unless you looked for it. but, if you're looking for a more religious based education, they offer that too (service based initiative, alternative spring breaks, masses, etc.).

you are required to take religious classes, but the offerings are quite widely varied. i took film and religion and world religions. the latter i enjoyed quite a bit; i learned quite a bit about religions other than christianity and judaism.
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Hybridy
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Username: Hybridy

Post Number: 75
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 12:38 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey Milwaukee,
Like many others here, I am a fourth year in the School of Architecture at UDM. I looked at University of Minnesota -Twin Cities, UWM, MSOE, and a few others but the architecture program at UDM is probably the best you can get in this region of the country. The 5-year accelerated program really gets into the core of the major right off the bat. The studios all 5 years are great compared with others that start in the third year. The professors are all great. Living on campus can be lame, but there is enough to do close by. Whatever they say bring a car. I'm actually from Hartford, WI so when I got here freshman year without a car I was kinda screwed. I would come take a tour of campus and see the architecture building and studios while they are active. And I can help you rock the interview for a decent scholarship if you're ACT and grades are up there.
Email me with any questions: gehrijac@yahoo.com
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 581
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:22 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

UDM-M. Arch. '06

I would venture a guess that a good majority of the students at UDM receive a scholarship. The school is expensive, but it is really easy to get a $10,000+ a year scholarship. Few people would probably pay the tuition price. I think that it is simply higher so that they can look good by giving out more scholarships. When I originally made my decision to go to the University of Cincinnati during the summer after finishing high school, I called my admissions counselor at UDM and told her. She got me an extra $3,000 a year (Ďincentive grantí) to come to UDM. That definitely swayed my thinking.

UDM is a small school and it sort of has the atmosphere of high school except that you walk between buildings. You will see the same people every day! This has its advantages and disadvantages, but I thought that I should point that out. The school has been traditionally a commuter school for over a hundred years, and still today a majority of the students commute and are from around the Detroit area.

The general curriculum requires that each student take a religion course, a philosophy course and then a third of either religion or philosophy. I am not Catholic and did not find UDM to be oppressive in that regard. The Society of Jesus (Jesuits) is actually a very liberal organization in the church priding itself on education and expending ones knowledge.

The architecture program is very under-rated, but does receive great accolades when noticed. While you will have a masterís degree in five years in the architecture program, it is very condensed because of this. After completing it, it is nice to be done, but that fifth year masters year is very intense with 17 credits per semester at the graduate level! In the fifth year there is both the thesis studio as well as 4 three-credit classes each semester. Assuming that you test out of some of the core classes your freshmen year (AP from high school or whatever), you can sort of work ahead and have fewer classes in grad school.

I was accepted to the University of Michigan (yes as a white male from a middle class family), but even chose UDM over the recognition that I knew a U of M degree would garner. I loved going to Detroit Mercy, met an entirely different genre of people from my suburban life and it gave me the ability to understand Detroit and fall in love with it. Now I work in Charlotte NC and I canít seem to communicate to the people with whom I work just how nice of a city Detroit is. I canít wait to come back at some point!
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 582
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 1:33 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

email:
paulfretz@ls3p.com
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 3712
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 3:02 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

UDM - M.S. Bus '95

Yes, don't worry about having to take a religion class. Like I previously mentioned, a Business or Medical Ethics class was an optional choice. There are many others.

And I have to agree, if you didn't know that it was a Catholic University, you would never have guessed that it was one! Most all professors are lay people of all faiths.
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Saintme
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Username: Saintme

Post Number: 31
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 4:01 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Didn't Jenny from the Block put in some time at UDM? I'm speaking of course of Jennifer Granholm. I didn't attend school there but I thought I remembered seeing her picture up as an alumni when I visited. I may be 100% wrong.
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Crew
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Username: Crew

Post Number: 1127
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 4:40 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I thought she went to UC-Berkeley and Harvard Law but she may have attended UofD (no mercy) back in the day.
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Archinnovator
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Username: Archinnovator

Post Number: 16
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 4:44 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm currently a 4th year architecture student at UDM as well...I fully agree with everything already said about the school. I love the program, and one of it's main draws for me was a greater creative focus than LTU. Like Charlottepaul, I was also accepted to U of M, but their architecture curriculum doesn't begin until your 3rd year if I remember correctly...I couldn't pass up the 5 year program here at UDM. On a different note, it's great to see all the UDM archies responding to prospective students!
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Chow
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Username: Chow

Post Number: 358
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 6:05 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

and i am also a fourth year udm student. the program is strong, even if the university has financial problems. the faculty is great and DO NOT underestimate the exchange programs. The Warsaw program is incredibl.

drunk, drunk, drunk
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 584
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 6:21 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, the faculty of UDM SOA are some of the best known architects/urban planners/urban designers in the Detroit area as well as outside the area. The architecture building is beautiful and well laid out, but unfortunately there are not a lot of resources available for the architect students.
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Milwaukee
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Username: Milwaukee

Post Number: 883
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 6:30 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for all the tips everyone. This is DetroitYes at its best. I'm pretty sure architecture is what I plan on getting into. Obviously, I'll think about it more, but this has genuinely helped.

I understand there isn't too much to do in surrounding neighborhood, but what is it like? Is it nice and safe?
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 586
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 6:36 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is pretty much in a residential neighborhood, but with Livernois on its West side as a main commercial strip.

North-really pretty nice
East-ok (nice middle class homes)
South-ghetto!
West-somewhere between ghetto and ok
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 3713
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 8:14 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just a quick question... has the McNichols Campus been fenced in? It wasn't when I was going there 1990-95, even though they had a guard at the entrance drive.

On the other hand, the Outer Drive Campus (former the Mercy campus, since sold off) was completely fenced in with tall wrought iron fence. One felt totally secure at that campus, while not quite as much at the McNichols campus.
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Livernoisyard
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Username: Livernoisyard

Post Number: 2663
Registered: 10-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 8:43 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Why would a fence make one secure if the bad guys were on the inside, too? If a student can get inside, so can they. Then they got you because the fence is now in the way.

Seems like false security.
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Rbdetsport
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Username: Rbdetsport

Post Number: 239
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 8:46 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

UofM- Design Oriented
UofD- Rounded
LT- Theory Based

That is also my order. I am looking into these schools because I will be studying Architecture in a view years. I dont like LT. UofM is my first choice, while UofD is a very close second.
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Gary
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Username: Gary

Post Number: 218
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 8:54 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There are Checkpoint Charlie style security gates at both the eastern (Fairfield) and western (Livernois)ends of Florence Ave. Florence was once an open city thoroughfare as well as the main drag of the U-D campus. Vehicle and pedestrian traffic flowed freely down that street back in the days when I was growing up in that neighborhood, but times have changed, obviously.
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 3714
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 9:10 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

LY, at Mercy College of Detroit the "BAD GUYS" were kept outside by a 10 foot tall fence that could not be climbed without a ladder. You had to show your school ID to get in passed the continually manned guard at the only entrance/exit way. If you were a student, it seems very unlikely that you were a bad guy.

All the Mercy Students that were transfered to the McNichols campus circa 1990-91 felt a little less secure because of a lack of a TOTAL perimeter fence.

I and many of my fellow classmates discussed this during our transfer, and always left in groups when evening classes ended (since we all had day jobs).

(Message edited by Gistok on March 01, 2007)
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 590
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 9:48 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The fence issue at the McNichols campus is really a big issue and probably does not relate to the intent of this thread. It could really be its own thread. I don't want to get too much into the fence issue because it is an extremely touchy issue for the university and I don't want 'Milwaukee' to be swayed by this issue of security.

Originally the campus was completely open to the neighborhood even with the street grid extending through campus like at the University of Michigan for example. Later the streets through were closed off, entrance booths were established, and now the fence does surround the entire campus, most of it wrought iron. It was a rather big ordeal to get the public right of way (Florence St.) closed off to traffic. Now there are turnstiles for people to walk through that require a residence hall card to access. The fence itself is hardly secure however. Certainly anyone can come onto campus at basically any time of the day. The university does try its hardest to keep the campus safe. They post notices if there is an incident, for example. There are however a few things that they need to add. At the gate booth, all you need to do is wave your hand when you pull up and they pretty much let you in. Also, the lighting is very poor on campus and surrounding it like between campus and the fraternity houses for example. Stuff does happen and has happened to people I know personally.

On the other hand, for a university that has a mission to the urban community, fencing itself off from the neighborhood in which it is located does not send the best image. The university is constantly getting advice that if it truly wants to show its commitment to the community it must take down the fence. There is always rumors that the fence is going to be coming down, but just last year they added another portion to it, so that is not likely to happen.
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Milwaukee
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Username: Milwaukee

Post Number: 884
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 01, 2007 - 11:04 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don't worry, I'm not really worried about security. If this was located in a war zone of a neighborhood, I wouldn't plan on attending the school. But it doesn't sound like it is, it looks pretty close to Palmer Wood's. I'm in the city a lot, and I understand that city life is what it is. Crime happens everywhere and really isn't an issue in my decision making.
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6nois
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Username: 6nois

Post Number: 68
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 4:15 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would like to correct the fact that there is only one entrance on Florence and that is on the Livernois side, the Fairfield side has been closed off. There is another entrance on McNichols that is only open during the day. The fence is a strange thing. I really don't think it needs to be there but if it is removed lighting, and security blue lights need to be more common on campus. Overall I have never felt unsafe on campus or in the surrounding area. South of school isn't great North and East are nice, and West isn't the best but isn't the worst. Did any of you go to the Beaux Arts Ball tonight?
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7even
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Username: 7even

Post Number: 133
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 9:13 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was at the ball and so was Hybirdy.
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 242
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 11:23 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Having been around the campus both in the old days when Florence Avenue went through and there was not a perimeter fence and since the street was closed and the fence erected, I can tell you that the fence has helped make the campus safer. In the old days quite a few people would wander through campus who had no legitimate reason to be there, and there were quite a few car burglaries, thefts out of classrooms and so on.

It's a shame because the neighbors are, for the most part, very nice people. The City does not do a good job controlling the few who aren't.
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Archinnovator
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Username: Archinnovator

Post Number: 18
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 12:40 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

beaux arts was a bust...no bar.
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 595
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 2:14 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

But Professorscott, if the "car burglaries, thefts out of classrooms and so on" still happen, then the fence is just more of an issue of image in the community if that or only a false sense of security. That's where it becomes debateable. Either they need to do a better job securing the school or they might as well just open it all back up.
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 243
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 2:33 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No, those types of incidents went down after the campus was fenced in. They didn't disappear; this is still the big city, but they decreased.

Believe me, it had very little to do with image.
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Hybridy
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Username: Hybridy

Post Number: 76
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Friday, March 02, 2007 - 3:59 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

yea a dry beaux arts
how subpar
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6nois
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Username: 6nois

Post Number: 70
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 12:56 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That it was. Didn't really seem that dry though, or at least not from what I saw.
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Rsa
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Username: Rsa

Post Number: 1037
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 10:48 am: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

dry beaux arts!? blasphemy! back in the day we used to have shuttle busses down to the venue so people could drink...

where was it this year? my favorite locale was in the lobby of the (now closed) david whitney building. it was a gotham/batman theme. very cool...
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6nois
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Username: 6nois

Post Number: 74
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 1:20 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It was on the 32nd floor of the Guardian Building. Not bad, good views, would have been better if the weather would have been nicer.
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Hagglerock
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Username: Hagglerock

Post Number: 412
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 1:45 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I visited my good buddy at UDM a few years ago. We partied at his frat house just outside the fence. I loved how open and friendly the atmosphere was, very different from my experience at U of M. I have nothing but good things to say about UDM and the students.

That same friend was mugged right outside his frat house one year. Somewhere between his house and the big iron fence. Yet I also had a co-worker who was pistol whipped behind Conor O- Niel's in downtown Ann Arbor.

Crime happens everywhere, go figure.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 4935
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 2:09 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

U of D has always had Jewish students who felt totally comfortable in that religious setting. The Univ. is part of a string of colleges like Dayton, Seattle, Portland, Buffalo, Dubuque, San Francisco, New York, Chicago, Milwaukee serving big major city Catholics and others. Each were built in working class areas, some of which have morphed into ghettos while others have been gentrified. For example, De Paul is in a restored Chicago northside and is very pricey, with more bars and restaurants, theaters, etc. to last a lifetime.

All Detroit colleges and universities are commuter schools, mainly. Student social life is off-campus, save a few dorms on each campus. Royal Oak and Ferndale are your basic social life.

50 yrs. ago, some students at U of D would have rented apts. or rooms in the neighborhood, but most were commuters. The same today. South of U of D is a tough, and deteriorated working class neighborhood. In the other directions, it isn't as bad. Ofcourse, North of campus in Gesu Parish, are the finest homes in the entire City of Detroit and nicely maintained.

For jazz fans, Bakers Keyboard Lounge is up at 8 Mile Rd. and Livernois. It is a national institution.

jjaba, Westsider.
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Professorjackson
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Username: Professorjackson

Post Number: 11
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 3:35 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"The university is constantly getting advice that if it truly wants to show its commitment to the community it must take down the fence."

I was a student there when the fence went up and the pedestrian mall was built where Florence Ave. used to run through campus. The mall is far from well-designed, but it is better to link the dorms to the classroom buildings with a pedestrian area than a street. Also, in my view the university has every right to control access to its property, just like all of its neighbors do, so the fence doesn't bother me one bit.

As to showing commitment to the community, I've always argued that the location of the campuses should mean a helluva lot more to people on that count than they sometimes do. They could have moved out to Clarkston with all the GI bill money in the 1940s and 1950s, but they didn't.

As to life on campus, it is what you make it. I was active with campus media and that made a huge difference, as did going to basketball games and even the occasional soccer and baseball (RIP) match.
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Professorscott
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Username: Professorscott

Post Number: 245
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Monday, March 05, 2007 - 4:06 pm: ††Edit PostDelete Post†††Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If the local businesses and homes want to show their commitment then they also should take down their razor wire and steel roll-up doors and window bars and bullet-resistant Lexan. Bosh. The fence is a useful security feature; the University is private property and not a public park.

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