Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2007 Detroit Can Afford More Cops (x3) Previous Next
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Genesyxx
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Username: Genesyxx

Post Number: 689
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 8:02 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I know this is just an error that will be changed eventually, but it was funny to me.

and yes.. there is a story in here...

DETROIT -- The Kilpatrick administration said Wednesday that Detroit can hire an additional 100 police officers and replace 100 who are leaving without raising taxes or cutting services, because they'll get a fraction of what it pays the veteran officers they'll replace.

DETROIT -- The Kilpatrick administration said Wednesday that Detroit can hire an additional 100 police officers and replace 100 who are leaving without raising taxes or cutting services, because they'll get a fraction of what it pays the veteran officers they'll replace.

DETROIT -- The Kilpatrick administration said Wednesday that Detroit can hire an additional 100 police officers and replace 100 who are leaving without raising taxes or cutting services, because they'll get a fraction of what it pays the veteran officers they'll replace.

In budget and contract maneuvering led by Christine Beatty, who is the mayor's chief of staff and point-person on labor negotiations, Detroit plans to add about 100 cops to the roughly 2,300 officers who patrol its streets, and another 100 would replace those who are expected to quit or have retired.

In budget and contract maneuvering led by Christine Beatty, who is the mayor's chief of staff and point-person on labor negotiations, Detroit plans to add about 100 cops to the roughly 2,300 officers who patrol its streets, and another 100 would replace those who are expected to quit or have retired.

In budget and contract maneuvering led by Christine Beatty, who is the mayor's chief of staff and point-person on labor negotiations, Detroit plans to add about 100 cops to the roughly 2,300 officers who patrol its streets, and another 100 would replace those who are expected to quit or have retired.

The money to pay the replacements is already in the current year's budget. The city could afford the other 100, Beatty said, because of the money it will save by not paying the higher salaries of the retiring officers.

The money to pay the replacements is already in the current year's budget. The city could afford the other 100, Beatty said, because of the money it will save by not paying the higher salaries of the retiring officers.

The money to pay the replacements is already in the current year's budget. The city could afford the other 100, Beatty said, because of the money it will save by not paying the higher salaries of the retiring officers.

Even more money may become available as a result of an arbitration award last week that allows officers to retire after 20 years instead of 25. That ruling, according to the Detroit Police Officers Association, makes roughly 500 men and women eligible to retire.

Even more money may become available as a result of an arbitration award last week that allows officers to retire after 20 years instead of 25. That ruling, according to the Detroit Police Officers Association, makes roughly 500 men and women eligible to retire.

Even more money may become available as a result of an arbitration award last week that allows officers to retire after 20 years instead of 25. That ruling, according to the Detroit Police Officers Association, makes roughly 500 men and women eligible to retire.

Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick announced in his State of the City address Tuesday night that Detroit would hire the new officers over the next 12 months and said a class is training at the academy.

Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick announced in his State of the City address Tuesday night that Detroit would hire the new officers over the next 12 months and said a class is training at the academy.

Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick announced in his State of the City address Tuesday night that Detroit would hire the new officers over the next 12 months and said a class is training at the academy.

The department has about 3,200 police officers, including the top executives. Many of the new cops will be fresh from the city's Police Academy. A starting officer, according to the current contract, makes about $28,000 a year; a lieutenant makes about $63,000.

The department has about 3,200 police officers, including the top executives. Many of the new cops will be fresh from the city's Police Academy. A starting officer, according to the current contract, makes about $28,000 a year; a lieutenant makes about $63,000.

The department has about 3,200 police officers, including the top executives. Many of the new cops will be fresh from the city's Police Academy. A starting officer, according to the current contract, makes about $28,000 a year; a lieutenant makes about $63,000.

The net effect of new officers on the city's budget should be zero, Beatty said

The net effect of new officers on the city's budget should be zero, Beatty said

The net effect of new officers on the city's budget should be zero, Beatty said

More cops is good news to Thelma Grissom, 75, who lives in the city's north end. "We need more cops. But that's not enough," said Grissom, a receptionist at Don Bosco Hall in Detroit. "We got to make sure we have the right cops. We need cops who will protect us and not cops who are afraid or working with the people dealing drugs."

More cops is good news to Thelma Grissom, 75, who lives in the city's north end. "We need more cops. But that's not enough," said Grissom, a receptionist at Don Bosco Hall in Detroit. "We got to make sure we have the right cops. We need cops who will protect us and not cops who are afraid or working with the people dealing drugs."

More cops is good news to Thelma Grissom, 75, who lives in the city's north end. "We need more cops. But that's not enough," said Grissom, a receptionist at Don Bosco Hall in Detroit. "We got to make sure we have the right cops. We need cops who will protect us and not cops who are afraid or working with the people dealing drugs."

To combat an upswing in violent crime, a trend being seen across the United States, the mayor also ordered Police Chief Ella Bully-Cummings to work with Detroit Public Schools to send in the police gang squad. And he vowed to put desk cops -- even Bully-Cummings -- on "regular" patrol in hot spots and to send SWAT units into high-crime areas.

To combat an upswing in violent crime, a trend being seen across the United States, the mayor also ordered Police Chief Ella Bully-Cummings to work with Detroit Public Schools to send in the police gang squad. And he vowed to put desk cops -- even Bully-Cummings -- on "regular" patrol in hot spots and to send SWAT units into high-crime areas.

To combat an upswing in violent crime, a trend being seen across the United States, the mayor also ordered Police Chief Ella Bully-Cummings to work with Detroit Public Schools to send in the police gang squad. And he vowed to put desk cops -- even Bully-Cummings -- on "regular" patrol in hot spots and to send SWAT units into high-crime areas.

"I have told the chief I want her to take back the streets," Kilpatrick said Tuesday. "I want the police to help the adults in the community restore order."

"I have told the chief I want her to take back the streets," Kilpatrick said Tuesday. "I want the police to help the adults in the community restore order."

"I have told the chief I want her to take back the streets," Kilpatrick said Tuesday. "I want the police to help the adults in the community restore order."

Councilwoman Sheila Cockrel said Kilpatrick showed true leadership in his vow to intensify his focus on stopping crime.

Councilwoman Sheila Cockrel said Kilpatrick showed true leadership in his vow to intensify his focus on stopping crime.

Councilwoman Sheila Cockrel said Kilpatrick showed true leadership in his vow to intensify his focus on stopping crime.

But, she added, "the proof is in the details."

But, she added, "the proof is in the details."

But, she added, "the proof is in the details."

She noted that rookie cops lack the street savvy and finesse of the veterans they will replace. "It's going to be really, really important to match up the new hires with officers with experience," she said.

She noted that rookie cops lack the street savvy and finesse of the veterans they will replace. "It's going to be really, really important to match up the new hires with officers with experience," she said.

She noted that rookie cops lack the street savvy and finesse of the veterans they will replace. "It's going to be really, really important to match up the new hires with officers with experience," she said.

In the current fiscal year, the city has budgeted $414 million for the Police Department.

In the current fiscal year, the city has budgeted $414 million for the Police Department.

In the current fiscal year, the city has budgeted $414 million for the Police Department.

The Detroit Police Officers Association, which has been at odds with Kilpatrick over the loss of about 1,000 police positions over several years, still thinks there are not enough experienced cops on the street, union president Marty Bandemer said.

The Detroit Police Officers Association, which has been at odds with Kilpatrick over the loss of about 1,000 police positions over several years, still thinks there are not enough experienced cops on the street, union president Marty Bandemer said.

The Detroit Police Officers Association, which has been at odds with Kilpatrick over the loss of about 1,000 police positions over several years, still thinks there are not enough experienced cops on the street, union president Marty Bandemer said.

Counting administrators and officers on desk duty, Detroit has about 3,300 police and a population of about 860,000.

Counting administrators and officers on desk duty, Detroit has about 3,300 police and a population of about 860,000.

Counting administrators and officers on desk duty, Detroit has about 3,300 police and a population of about 860,000.

At its zenith, in 1973 and with a population of about 1.5 million, Detroit had 5,600 officers, according to union statistics.

At its zenith, in 1973 and with a population of about 1.5 million, Detroit had 5,600 officers, according to union statistics.

At its zenith, in 1973 and with a population of about 1.5 million, Detroit had 5,600 officers, according to union statistics.

In the summer of 2005, the mayor released 150 cops, closed the police academy and stopped filling vacancies. City officials estimated the number of police officers dropped by about 1,000.

In the summer of 2005, the mayor released 150 cops, closed the police academy and stopped filling vacancies. City officials estimated the number of police officers dropped by about 1,000.

In the summer of 2005, the mayor released 150 cops, closed the police academy and stopped filling vacancies. City officials estimated the number of police officers dropped by about 1,000.

In recent months, however, all who had been let go were offered their jobs back as officers retired.

In recent months, however, all who had been let go were offered their jobs back as officers retired.

In recent months, however, all who had been let go were offered their jobs back as officers retired.

"You may be getting more cops on the street, but the ones you have don't have the experience," Bandemer said. "If you want people to come back to Detroit, you have to do a better job fighting crime."

"You may be getting more cops on the street, but the ones you have don't have the experience," Bandemer said. "If you want people to come back to Detroit, you have to do a better job fighting crime."

"You may be getting more cops on the street, but the ones you have don't have the experience," Bandemer said. "If you want people to come back to Detroit, you have to do a better job fighting crime."

http://www.detnews.com/apps/pb cs.dll/article?AID=/20070315/M ETRO/703150384&theme=Metro-Det roit%20budget
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Supersport
Member
Username: Supersport

Post Number: 11416
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 8:39 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Your choice to repeat everything three times is annoying at best. After realizing your whole damn post was like that, I skipped reading and went to the article.....which I found to be exactly the same, in it's annoying x3 format. LOL
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B24liberator
Member
Username: B24liberator

Post Number: 64
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 9:12 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, I was about to post a small "gripe" as well-- But I see that would only be akin to killing the messenger...
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Johnlodge
Member
Username: Johnlodge

Post Number: 255
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 10:13 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That article was hilarious. I can' even imagine what kind of coding error causes, not only every paragraph to appear 3 times, but also Kwame's photo on the side. Maybe they just really want to drive their point home! LOL
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Leland_palmer
Member
Username: Leland_palmer

Post Number: 246
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 11:18 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We should leave comments x3 in response
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Detroitplanner
Member
Username: Detroitplanner

Post Number: 1083
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 15, 2007 - 1:18 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Interesting, so the net increase is not 200 cops, but only 100? What about the costs of benefits? 200 cops with the same benefits costs more than 100.

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