Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2007 Memories of DPS. Previous Next
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Danny
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Username: Danny

Post Number: 5664
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 8:37 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Before Detroit Public Schools went into shambles, what did DPS do to educate our kids to a higher circular level back then like the 1920s 30s 40s or 50 and beyond? Are they any special athletic programs, beautiful school buildings? Was it ethnically diverse? Did some of the forum memebers went to DPS and graduated? Who are your favorite teachers and how did he or she change you or the school district? Any comments.





(Message edited by danny on March 27, 2007)
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Buyamerican
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Username: Buyamerican

Post Number: 25
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 10:59 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I attended Howe Elementary, Foch Jr., and Southeastern High in the 50's and 60's. I still have friends from my elementary school and stay in contact with one of our favorite teachers. I don't think there are too many people out there who can say they go out to dinner with their first grade teacher from 50 years ago. The teachers cared about their students, they could put an arm around a shoulder when a kid was hurt or upset...now, well everyone knows what happens to a teacher if they dare to put a hand on a kid. I received a wonderful education. In retrospect, I wish I had paid more attention to what my teachers were trying to teach us instead of watching the clock for the big hand to hit the twelve and the little hand to hit the three!
Incidentally, I don't remember snow days...rarely got a ride to school...walked home for lunch and back to school again, all uphill! LOL.
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Imhere
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Username: Imhere

Post Number: 20
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 12:29 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I went to McGregor elementary in the '70s. I remember Mr. Wilson (gym) and Mr. Sacha (sp?) (science) to this day. They really seemed to care about the students and teaching.

I remember going to Saturday school with Mr. Sacha as part of special science class for the students with better grades.

When my niece went to McGregor in the early 90's Mr. Wilson had been promoted to Principal and he still remember my brother and I.
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Detroitteacher
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Username: Detroitteacher

Post Number: 978
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 5:18 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As a teacher, I still hug kids if they need it and offer a shoulder if they need to cry. My students come to my house (they figured out where I lived, I never told them) to turn in work or to spark up the BBQ. I'm never alone with a kid and never invite them over. They just show up...

I have fond memories of my early grade school years at Ann Arbor Trail Elementary School...and still can picture my Kindergarten teacher's smile as we walked in the door each day. Mrs. Weisak was my K teacher and Mrs. Perry was my 1st grade teacher. I also remember a kid who looked like Howdy Doody (his name was Tim) throwing up on me in 1st grade during lunch and how Mrs. Perry carried me home during lunch (it was just around the block and I was crying so hard, because Tim ruined my new dress, that I couldn't walk) so that I could change my clothes. Don't know where mom was but that was before we locked doors so I didn't have any trouble getting in the house. This was in 1972. Won't find anyone doing that these days. AH, the memories.
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Jjaba
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Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 5086
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 5:48 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nice story, Detroitteacher.
jjaba walked to school but never ever went home for lunch. Parents were working.

One annual ritual at Noble School on Fullerton and Ohio was the fieldtrip to Ford Rouge plants. We saw every aspect of production over several tours to Fords in elementary school. We loved the outing. To this day, jjaba loves industrial touring to see widgits being cranked out. He attended Noble from K-7th. 8th and 9th at Tappan Intermediate, 10-12, Cass Tech. Print shop.

Cass Tech. printers actually work. We did the service printing for the DPS. Even with that, we had time for academics and 50% or more of us went to colleges. Cass Tech. is a huge melting pot of Detroiters. Class of '59 had 150 ethnic names in it. Yes, Jews in the printshop. Many of us were first generation English speakers.

The tours probably was intended to show kids their future, but amazingly, a lot of us went on to college. jjaba was a college professor for 30 yrs.

jjaba, Westsider on the Grand River electrics.
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Formerdetroiter
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Username: Formerdetroiter

Post Number: 2
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 6:36 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I went to McKenny Elementary in the late 60s....loved school, loved the teachers. As I remember, the students and teachers were a diverse group. I received a great education in the few years I went there--we moved out to Livonia, where my entire educational growth was stunted by the experimental "open classroom" concept, which consisted of us building our own "forts" with plywood and creating our own schedules every day.
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Craig
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Username: Craig

Post Number: 99
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 6:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm curious, Professor Jjaba: when you lectured your students would say stuff like "Prof. Jjaba will administer an exam next Tuesday," and "Prof. Jjaba will not hold office hours this week on account that he's getting fitted for a new tweed jacket"?
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Jjaba
Member
Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 5088
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 2:01 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Craig, precisely.

jjaba, Professor.
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 1269
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 3:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had an interesting early school experience. Went to Dearborn Public Schools (William Ford, Chase and Ford Road) for grades 1-4, got nearly all A's, loved school

Came the end of the war (No, the BIG one) and we moved into Detroit, and I attended Monnier School for grades 5-8. Hated it. Completely different system and I never did adjust. Slumped to a C average at best, mainly because I hated the joint.

Fortunately, Mackenzie High School got me back on track, although my academic career has been only a step above "marginal". I get bored in a classroom, always did, always will. I probably needed a Professor Jjaba somewhere along the line.

Anyway, I sure hated Monnier School. I wasn't particularly unpleased to see it on the list of school closings recently.
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Gibran
Member
Username: Gibran

Post Number: 116
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 3:30 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Carlton k
Guardian Angels 1-8
Arthur 9 (vaguely remember :})
Denby 10-12 remember fondly

Teachers and Coaches: Mr Lewis (like a dad) Mr Mathis like a stern grandpa, I will get out my books not to leave the rest out...Great Economics teacher Mr. Richardson: and Literature (she was so cool) Mr. Demerick VP.... Mr. Lux in English built my love of reading. Mr. Lewis took a slow kid with little running ability... believed in me despite a leg disability and gave me a chance to run track... Mr. Mathis did the same in x-country...great men.
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Jjaba
Member
Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 5094
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 3:31 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He loved Dearborn Schools because they kept everything "clean" out there, if you catch jjaba's drift. Ray1936 shows classical signs of culture shock at the new school, but on his paper route, he got right with the program.

Professor jjaba would have immediately made him lavatory captain at the boys' door, controlled who went in and out during recess. Then, jjaba would have upgraded him to class Air Raid Monitor, then to safety patrol outside with AAA white sash. By 6th grade, Ray1936 would be running the place. Obviously, some teacher got him ready to take the police exam and how to wield a nightstick.

jjaba, old newsboy.
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 1270
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 4:18 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Then, jjaba would have upgraded him to class Air Raid Monitor, then to safety patrol outside with AAA white sash.

Been there, done that, Prof. :-)
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The_rock
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Username: The_rock

Post Number: 1654
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 6:14 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ray'36--With all those credentials you might have been elgible to delivery the Detroit Shopping News. I said might.
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Bpjeff
Member
Username: Bpjeff

Post Number: 33
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 6:33 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Went to Drivers Ed at Cody High. Based on my driving record, I did not learn too much!
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Jjaba
Member
Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 5098
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 8:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So Monnier School wasn't all that bad. Ray1936 assumed leadership learned in Henry Ford's classrooms.

Bpjeff, jjaba is an excellent commercial driver, all of which he learned at the Mackenzie HS lot, 1957.

jjaba on the Westside parallel parking.
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 1271
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 9:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I still remember things from grades 1-4 in Dearborn. We were taught very strongly that our school, William Ford, was named after Henry Ford's father. We were taught Michigan geography early on, with emphasis on towns and counties, and their claims to fame. To this day I remember that Thomas E. Dewey was a native of Owosso.

Detroit schools never taught any of that. I found out on my own much later who Monnier and Mackenzie were.
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Danny
Member
Username: Danny

Post Number: 5681
Registered: 02-2004
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 9:58 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

By the early 1980s, almost the remaining 300 plus DPS school buildings with the student population is no longer ethnically diversed. More black population in Detroit ghettohoods means more black parents sending their kids to all Detroit Public schools. The student population has reached over 70% black, 22% white, 2% Hispanic, 0.9% Asian, 0.01% Arab Muslim. Most of the DPS buildings with full white student population were at SW Detroit far NE and far NW side.
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Savannahsmiles
Member
Username: Savannahsmiles

Post Number: 22
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 10:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I went to Monnier for 1st grade. I only knew my teacher as Miss Carrie. I was the only white kid in my class and there was one other white kid in the 1st grade. Let's face it... kids can be cruel. That was the most miserable year I ever had. Other than two weeks at Hunter Middle School, (my mother liked to move around a lot) I didn't go to DPS again until HS. I went to Southwestern. I can't remember all my teachers, but some were Mrs. Something Bobbie - English, Mr. Something Eaton - World History (these two, IMO, not fit to teach), Mr. Joseph Soltesz - Business Law, Mr. Edwin Kulesza - General Biology and Mr. Jimmy Jackson - English. The last three were awesome and I will never forget them. I had Mr. Miller at SW for Driver Ed. He was a smart@$$ but likeable. I passed... that's all that mattered to me. I also attended Chadsey and Western in the midst of my HS years, but wasn't there long enough to remember much of anything.

I have a niece and two nephews who attended Harms Elementary and they always seemed to have a great time. When the youngest moved to TN to finish elementary, he never even fell behind. IMO, that says a lot about his teachers at Harms.

Other nieces and nephews attended Guyton, Bennett, Boynton and McMillan.
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Ray1936
Member
Username: Ray1936

Post Number: 1272
Registered: 01-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 10:26 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Monnier was named for Peter C. Monnier, farmer and extensive land holder who donated land for the construction of the first Monnier School at Schaefer and Grand River. It later became the Monnier Branch Library, next to the old 14th Precinct police station. The new Monnier school was built in the early 1930s.

Mackenzie was named for David Mackenzie, early President of Wayne University 'way before it became Wayne State.
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Jjaba
Member
Username: Jjaba

Post Number: 5100
Registered: 11-2003
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 10:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

jjaba has watched Ray1936 with his perfectly written posts. Never a typo nor misspelling, in the style of an officer of the Court who either gets it right or the criminal walks Scott-free.

jjaba now takes the liberty of congratulating DPS for this example of literacy. How many here can name the exact location of their neighborhood library, including the full catalogue of Thomas E. Dewey decimals.

jjaba, Westside DPS and Michigan public collegian.

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