Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2007 Tricentennial State Park Question Previous Next
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Andyguard73
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Username: Andyguard73

Post Number: 215
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 1:08 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

After reading the @water thread, I was reading the @water website. It says that the Tricentennial State Park will be "built to completion in 2008, and in reading the State Park's website it says it will be built in a 6 year plan. Does anyone know if any work has been done on the other 3 phases of the park (upland, lowland and visitor's center) since the Harbor opened in 2004? Does the city even own all the land for the park yet, and if they do have they started remediating the land? I'll be in town next weekend for a rugby tournament and I'll try to take a trip down to check it out myself. I'm just hoping there's a resident or someone with knowledge on the future of the park. Thanks guys.
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Downtown_remix
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Username: Downtown_remix

Post Number: 87
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 6:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

several parcels of the park are complete, they seem to be finishing the boardwalk(riverwalk)first which is almost complete from cobo to harbortown. Your best bet would be to park along atwater an walk the boardwalk to get a clear idea as to what areas are being reserved for future housing developement just north of the riverwalk. Right now is just a huge field of prime property. A visionary could figure out the ultimate plan for the park.
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Fishtoes2000
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Username: Fishtoes2000

Post Number: 188
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 9:42 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm meeting with DNR Parks tomorrow. I'll see what I can dig up.

I believe all of the future state park land is in the city's hand, but as of a month ago, the DNR didn't have their lease for the latter phases.
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Andyguard73
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Username: Andyguard73

Post Number: 218
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 27, 2007 - 10:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the info guys, and Fishtoes, that'd be awesome.

For those who haven't seen it yet, this is the link to the master plan for the park, and it really looks awesome. Scroll to the bottom to get the interactive part of the page. It's a little tricky to navigate, but it is worth it and has some great renderings.

http://www.michigandnr.com/Pub lications/PDFS/RecreationCampi ng/TSPH2.html
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Fishtoes2000
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Username: Fishtoes2000

Post Number: 189
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2007 - 9:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's the skinny...

The DNR is very close to finalizing their lease agreement with Detroit for the land from the current state park downstream to the new pavillion. If they sign off on this lease within a month as hoped, Phase 2 of Tri-Centennial park will go out to bid. With some luck, they could break ground by this fall.

There will be public meetings prior to planning the later phases. These phases may include the Globe Building, a visitors' center and more. They really want to ask the public what they want prior to moving forward.
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Ericsprague
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Username: Ericsprague

Post Number: 8
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, April 09, 2007 - 12:42 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I e-mailed the MI DNR on their website form to ask for any updated info. available and received this update from Kristen Bennett. In summary, a new 5-acre section of Tricentennial Park, adjacent to the Rivard Plaza section of the Riverwalk and extending along the river in front of the @Water Lofts site, should begin construction this summer.

--

Thank you for your inquiry on Tricentennial State Park and Harbor. I hope you are enjoying the newly renovated harbor and the amenities that go along with it. I am the SE Michigan District planner for the Parks and Recreation Division and the Project Manger for the Tricentennial project. We at the DNR are working very hard to finalize our lease with the City of Detroit for the 31 acre State Park. We are finalizing the design for the Phase II part of the park which will connect to the new DRFC Rivard Plaza. This Phase will be around 5 acres in size and will provide a stormwater demonstration area, a bike path and connection to the Riverwalk. This area will be highly interpreted for the natural and historic context of Detroit as well as discussing stormwater management and alternative energy. I have attached a graphic. The next phase of the project has not be designed yet. The DNR plans to hold a series of public forums to ask the community and the Citizens of Michigan what types of things that they would like to see in this landmark State Park.

We are anticipating to start construction of the Phase II part of the park this summer. If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact me or the park manager Jamie Allen [see website for contact info].


Tricentennial Park Phase II

--

Thus, Phase II is the Lowland Park Parcel in the graphic. I believe the Atwater West Parcel may be the parking lot that was constructed behind Rivard Plaza last fall. Rivard Plaza should be opening within a month or two.
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Andyguard73
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Username: Andyguard73

Post Number: 227
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 11, 2007 - 6:10 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thats great to hear that the park is progressing. I didn't even think to email the DNR directly, thanks
Ericsprague!
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Urbanoutdoors
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Username: Urbanoutdoors

Post Number: 203
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Monday, April 16, 2007 - 2:42 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://www.modeldmedia.com/developmentnews/tricentennial9007.aspx

April 17, 2007

Tricentennial Park expansion to demonstrate stormwater runoff
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is finalizing details with the city of Detroit on a lease that will enable Tricentennial State Park and Harbor to expand from its current nine acres to more than 31. Once land control is assured, DNR will begin work on the seven-acre Lowland Park Parcel, a piece of land immediately east of the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy's Rivard Plaza.

The Lowland Park Parcel will be returned to wetlands that will be used to demonstrate stormwater runoff treatment. Vicki Anthes, planning section chief of the DNR's parks and recreation division explains, "We want to show how you can treat runoff without sending it to a treatment plant." Beyond the interpretive elements associated with the wetland, Lowland Park will include bike and pedestrian paths that will connect to the DRC's RiverWalk.

The remainder of Tricentennial's acreage is reserved for usage to be determined after a series of public meetings are held later this year. Anthes explains that the DNR wants to learn "What kinds of things the public wants that are compatible with our mission," noting that the activities might be both "educational and recreational."

Anthes also notes that the part of Tricentennial Park north of Atwater Street will include a connection to the Dequindre Cut. "This will be one of the important connections for our visitors to the park."

Ron Olson, chief of DNR's parks and recreation division says that, to Tricentennial Park, the agency hopes "to bring elements of State Parks and Recreation Areas across the state. We want to take elements of those features and encase them within this park even though it is small."

He goes on to say that, "This is also an entry point get urban folks interested in the out-of-doors, as gateway to go to other parks in the state. It is also a key piece of the riverfront revitalization."

The park's uniqueness helped the DNR secure funding for it. Contributors have included Michigan Economic Development Corporation, Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan's Greenways Initiative, Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Department of Transportation and the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund. Olson says that enough funds have been raised to pay for the construction of Lowland Park, but that the agency would need to raise additional funds for the remaining undeveloped part of the park.

The existing park and harbor will remain open. The 52-slip marina is primarily transient but, beginning this season, eight slips will become available as seasonal rentals. Tricentennial Park does not and will never require a vehicle permit for entry as do other State Parks.

Sources: Vicki Anthes and Ron Olson, DNR
Writer: Kelli B. Kavanaugh

(Message edited by Urbanoutdoors on April 16, 2007)
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 4132
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, April 16, 2007 - 3:01 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK, I'll play the devils advocate... just how much recreational activity is involved with "storm water runoff".

I guess what they are doing is returning part of the park to swampland... and allowing some of the stormwater that is generated thru city storm drains to run into this swamp before going into the river.

How nice... the smell alone will be very entertaining.... :-(

Actually, there are a lot of chemicals in storm water runoff, many of them toxic to humans. So although the marshland weeds will absorb many of these, those chemicals will still be there... in silt and decaying weeds.

I'm sure that I wouldn't want to live in a nearby development on a ripe hot summer day... and God forbid someone falls into the swampy brew...

Not really trying to poo-poo this idea, but it holds no interest to me.
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Charlottepaul
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Username: Charlottepaul

Post Number: 795
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, April 16, 2007 - 5:19 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"stormwater runoff treatment" It isn't raw sewage. It will prob. most likely be from the surrounding streets: not exactly toxic. Sure it won't be as pure as the creeks out in northern Oakland County, but that is the reason for this education! It isn't anymore likely to kill/injure someone than the water sitting on the street in a puddle after it rains.
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Urbanoutdoors
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Username: Urbanoutdoors

Post Number: 205
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Monday, April 16, 2007 - 5:27 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just will filter out Some NPS (non point source) pollution before it hits the river.
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5370
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, April 16, 2007 - 5:31 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I love the idea of returning part of the park to a wetlands function. This will be very interesting and unique. It's so cool that amongst the big city, Detroit will have natural areas on the river. This is turning out better than I expected.
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 4137
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Monday, April 16, 2007 - 5:48 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, I guess it won't be too bad...

But boy if you have ever been to Champine Park in St. Clair Shores (the only public waterfront park in the city at 12 Mile & Jefferson), boy it reeks to high heaven there. All the high growth vegetation along the water filters the water in a similar way as described (there's no beach of any kind), but it really is a very unpleasant aroma.
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Fishtoes2000
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Username: Fishtoes2000

Post Number: 194
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 1:14 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'd also suggest it's a great way to teach the connection between our storm sewers and our rivers -- and the importance of not dumping waste in either.

Another point to consider is DNR Parks is not blessed with money. What they build is greatly dependent on what available grants they can get. The first phase of the park was built in large part with Waterways Funds (from boater fees and fuel taxes.) This wetlands/storm sewer demonstration project is getting money from another grant source (though I don't recall the details right now, but it's probably through the DEQ.)
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Lmichigan
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Username: Lmichigan

Post Number: 5377
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 1:58 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, same thing's happening here in Lansing, in just a week or two the city is going to get started on a rain garden project along Michigan Avenue leading to the capitol. They saw a government grant out there and ran with it. They also filter storm water runoff before it goes into the river removing a lot of the crap. What really drove the proposal, though, was that I cities in most Michigan cities (and I guess in any other polluted area), by a federal mandate, are going to have to put into place some measure to reduce pollutants in water ways, anyway, so these kind of plans are not only beautification, but their practical and eventually mandatory. The idea is to get this out of the way before we have to pay more for it later.
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Gistok
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Username: Gistok

Post Number: 4139
Registered: 08-2004
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 1:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

For the last 3 years along Lakeshore Dr. in Grosse Pointe Farms the wetlands growth has been spreading and proliferating. However on any given summer day, the stench of the wetlands was horrible. Not sure if it was due to stagnant water within the wetlands growth, rotting vegetation, or pollutants. But it was not a pleasant experience. I noticed this spring that all the vegetation was cut down in that section.

Now I'm not saying that all planned wetlands are going to be like that, but these projected plans to reduce pollutants in the waterways may have some unwanted consequences.
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Transitrider
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Username: Transitrider

Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 17, 2007 - 1:49 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hang on a second, the runoff abatement is totally different from what's happened along Lake St. Clair.

The wetlands project is part of a larger trend of using plants to absorb rainwater that runs off of impervious surfaces like concrete and asphalt before it reaches a body of water. In a natural environment, rainwater is absorbed everywhere as it falls, and only a small amount makes into streams. In a built environment, buildings, roads, sidewalk, parking lots, etc. don't absorb their share, so water accumulates and we channel into drains and such. But if the storm runoff is overwhelming, it goes straight into the river without adequate filtering of all the crap it picked up along the way (particles of metals, rubber, paint, dust, etc. that accumulate in denser concentrations the more water there is.) The right plants can absorb a lot of water before it gets accumulates too many chemicals, etc. By increasing the amount of plants in buffer areas, we can reduce the strain on our storm drains and the likelihood they'll fail when we have severe storms.

I don't think the point of this demonstration is to treat water from the storm drains, but to reduce the burden on those drains by creating a buffer that can absorb some of the runoff from nearby impervious services. There is a lot of new interest in this idea, and the costs are quite low, and serve to beautify areas that need it. If all parking structures and lots were surrounded by gardens, bushes, etc, their "rainwater footprint" could be reduced.

The wetlands along Lakeshore Drive and in other places on the lake have happened due to many factors, but most predominant is that there is a point sticking out into the lake, and the current moves sediment into the corner slowly. Over time beaches have sprung up, and now those beaches have become wetlands, and there is resistance to dredging them, while others wish they'd been mitigated sooner.

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