Discuss Detroit Archives - Beginning January 2007 Detnews: Michigan's pain far from over Previous Next
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Thejesus
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Post Number: 801
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 11:25 am: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This article makes some good points, such as the rise of a skilled, educated workforce being the only thing that will pull MI out of its slump


SEMCOG economic outlook

Michigan's pain far from over
Mike Wilkinson / The Detroit News
Friday, March 30, 2007

Dramatic losses in the domestic auto industry will keep Metro Detroit mired in an economic crisis, fueling continued population declines and harsh changes in the job market for at least a decade, according to a bleak forecast released Thursday.

The report, issued by the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments, predicts that, for the first time ever, the Big Three's U.S. market share will fall below 50 percent next year and that an auto-borne regional recovery is unlikely.

Unlike the recoveries in the 1970s, '80s and '90s, the days of waiting for the Big Three to pull the region out of recessions are over, as car prices have remained stagnant, costs have gone up and the domestic automakers have continued to lose market share.

The current economic problems, labeled the "worst in our lifetime," are "clearly structural and not cyclical," the report says.

Only the rise of a more educated, skilled work force can alter the dour prediction, according to the report from SEMCOG, a regional planning organization that serves Wayne, Oakland, Macomb, Livingston, Washtenaw, Monroe and St. Clair counties.

"What it takes is a new Michigan," said Don Grimes, an author of the study and a research specialist at the University of Michigan's Institute of Labor and Industrial Relations.

Pulling out of the downward spiral will be difficult as fewer jobs and people will likely mean lower tax revenues, making change difficult, officials say. "The state has lost revenue. How do you reinvent yourself without any new revenue?" asked Phil Cavanagh, a Wayne County commissioner.

If the forecast is accurate -- and other demographers agree with its near-term assessments -- the effects on Metro Detroit will have profound implications for health care, housing, education and government.

Fewer people could keep the housing market stagnant, fewer students will force more school districts to restructure and governments banking on growth will have to do more with less.

Previous report was upbeat

The report, titled "A Region in Turbulence and Transition," is a radical departure from SEMCOG's last 30-year forecast in 2001. That one called for continued growth in jobs and people. It did not foresee gasoline at $3 a gallon and a five-year war in Iraq.

Among the conclusions:

# Auto manufacturing, which has already trimmed more than 55,000 workers in the past five years, will drop another 27,000 jobs over the next five, mirroring a plunge in the overall number of manufacturing jobs.

# The region's population will drift downward for another nine years as an estimated 25,000 people move out each year. Lower birth rates will contribute to the decline.

# Opportunities in health care will soar as an aging population demands medical services. The sector will add more than 100,000 jobs over the next decade, dwarfing the number of manufacturing jobs in 2017. In 2001, there were 100,000 more manufacturing jobs than health care jobs in the region.

# It could be more than a decade before the region recovers from its job and population losses.

For those on the front line of the job market, SEMCOG's forecast underscores reality.

"People in general don't understand how dramatically the job picture is changing," said Mary McDougall, president of Operation ABLE, a nonprofit that held a job fair in Southfield this week for people over 40 who are looking to change careers. With more than 2,500 job seekers, it was the organization's largest job fair in two decades.

Job market is shifting

Finding a solution will be difficult in a region that has relied on the auto industry for its wealth and growth. But Grimes and others say that reliance must be broken because people are not buying Big Three vehicles as often as they did.

In 1995, nearly three-quarters of all vehicles bought in the United States were built by the Big Three. Just 13 years later, SEMCOG predicts that market share will fall below 50 percent.

"There is no bounce-back potential," Grimes said.

Among the proposed solutions: Regional economic development organizations are pushing to use the area's engineering-rich job market as a launch pad. The governor has touted efforts to get more kids into college -- and lure adults back into the classroom.

"We're preparing every student to continue their education after high school," said Liz Boyd, spokeswoman for Gov. Jennifer Granholm. "Education is the key to the new economy."

If there is a silver lining, it's in per capita incomes. SEMCOG predicts they will rise over the next five years as increased productivity-- fewer workers doing more work -- will lead to greater profits. Employers are expected to share those gains with employees. And those who already hold college degrees will be less likely to feel the impact of the continued decline.

"Communities with a lot of college degrees are going to ride this upset in the auto industry and do well," Grimes said.

As regional leaders digest the report, SEMCOG officials hope it will do more than depress people. They want it to act as a catalyst.

"We hope to be part of changing the understanding of what needs to happen," said Jim Rogers, manager of SEMCOG's data center.

Indeed, numerous efforts are under way to get community, political and corporate leaders together behind a comprehensive vision. Detroit Renaissance expects to report on its recovery proposal in May.

"If we do nothing, those are the numbers that are likely to happen," said Doug Rothwell, president of the organization and an ex-GM executive. "We have an opportunity to impact these conclusions."


http://www.detnews.com/apps/pb cs.dll/article?AID=/20070330/M ETRO/703300437&imw=Y

(Message edited by thejesus on March 30, 2007)
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Pete
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Post Number: 63
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 12:53 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The key line in the study is this:

"Only the rise of a more educated, skilled work force can alter the dour prediction..."

This is the overarching challenge facing Detroit, and is the solution to so many of Detroit's social ills.
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Detroitrulez
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Username: Detroitrulez

Post Number: 203
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 1:02 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

WOE NELLY! where can I get one of those "last one out turn off the lights" t-shirts?

"worst in our lifetime," and "structural not cyclical" doesn't exactly give me the warm fuzzy feeling inside. This is about as uplifting as a report on the New Orleans economy....speaking of which, I need a sazerac. Last one to the Napoleon House buys.

(Message edited by detroitrulez on March 30, 2007)
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Jt1
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Post Number: 8784
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 1:04 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The question I have is about the education angle. I agree we need a more educated workforce but how can the state get the young, educated grads to stay.

How do we get grads from our Universities to stay in Michigan. If they flee then it is just a case of taxpayers subsidizing University costs for kids to go elsewhere after they graduate.
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Upinottawa
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Post Number: 783
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 1:23 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jt1, one way would be to lure expanding companies to Michigan (or at least companies that intend to expand operations in Michigan over a period of time). Expanding companies will have a need to hire new employees periodically, therefore giving new graduates employment opportunities in Michigan.

Of course, actually luring the such companies and identifying such companies are two substantial hurdles.

That being said, significantly reinvestment in Detroit-proper (both public and private sector) and improving the city as a place to live, work and play is key to retaining young graduates. For example, look at how many twentysomethings live in downtown condos in Toronto.

Of course, the above is a constant theme on this forum and such reinvestment can only occur over a period of time.

(Message edited by upinottawa on March 30, 2007)
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Johnlodge
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 1:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I wouldn't freak out about this report. This is a transitional time. We are moving away from manufacturing and automotive. It may be a bumpy ride, but it is survivable, and Michigan will end up stronger and more stable for it. If the only skill set some people have is working in a factory and they are unable/unwilling to learn now skills, they may need to leave the state. Those who do have useful skill sets will stay and work and create new businesses. I just got a new job at a growing company. I went to one interview and was hired, meanwhile people are telling me it's impossible to find a job. Well, I know at least one job available, mine, after I leave to start at the new one.
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Thejesus
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 1:47 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As much as I'd like to see significant investment in Detroit, I wouldn't place it any higher or more likely to help out the Michigan economy than significant investment in other places such as Southfield, Troy, Livonia, Royal Oak, etc...
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Wash_man
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Post Number: 385
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 1:51 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I read this article last night. I work in the auto industry for a supplier. I have been thinking about going back to school because I want OUT of the automotive business. This article prompted me to begin searching college catalogs immediately. My only problem is how do I (or anyone)completely change careers in their 40's? I can't live on an entry level salary at this point in my life. Maybe I can, but I don't want to.
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Upinottawa
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 1:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The, it goes back to the urban versus suburban divide. The majority of the young professionals that I know (including myself) prefer a vibrant urban environment during their pre-kid years than a quaint suburban environment (even though both can be equally nice). Detroit has trouble delivering the vibrant urban environment viz-a-viz New York, Boston, Washington, Chicago, Philly, Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Ottawa, etc., etc., etc. (and don't get me started on Europe).

The lack of such really makes Metro Detroit a tough sell (especially with the lack of jobs currently). For example, I am a young professional who has an American mother (i.e. it would not be difficult to get a Green Card). If Detroit was like Philly, I would move back in a second. Troy just doesn't cut it at this point in my life.
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Iheartthed
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 2:02 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't see how it isn't blatantly evident that investing in the core city is essential to making Michigan competitive again.
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Detroitbill
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Post Number: 195
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 2:06 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey Up, is Ottawa better now ? when you mentioned it as a vibrant urban city I was surprised,, I lived there a long time ago 1980-1984 and it was the most boring place I ever lived,, was a beautiful city to look at but just died on the weekends, Sounds like it has changed for the better.
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Thejesus
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 2:15 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

because the issues facing MI are not limited to the core of the city...people in all the places I mentioned are suffering from the economic problems as well...as are people in Ann Arbor and some on the other side of the state...there are many companies and industries in these areas that operate almost independent of Detroit, and yet they're still having problems...

I'm not suggesting we neglect Detroit...so don't turn it into that...but places like Troy and Royal Oak are a little further along in becoming a place that attracts young professionals like other urban areas, and investment in those areas would help out as well...

(Message edited by thejesus on March 30, 2007)
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Upinottawa
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 2:18 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bill, I currently live just North of the Market. The area has really gentrified in the past 10 years -- bars, stores, restaurants and condos gallore.

Centertown is still pretty lifeless, but neighbourhoods like the Gleeb, New Edinburgh, Westboro, etc. are flourishing. Unfortunately that means housing prices in the core are really expensive.

For example, where hookers ruled the streets only 10 years ago, in the same area of the market today (i.e. Dalhousie) you would be hard pressed to get anything in decent shape over 800 square feet for under $300,000.
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Iheartthed
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Post Number: 570
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 2:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"but places like Troy and Royal Oak are a little further along in becoming a place that attracts young professionals like other urban areas, and investment in those areas would help out as well..."

Royal Oak, maybe, Troy not so much. And even still, Royal Oak cannot be anything to attract people to the region if Detroit's image is in shambles. Nobody moves to Troy for the night life. That wasn't the town it was built to be. We can talk for days about the availability of jobs or whatnot, but while young professionals are still a premium they will make the market. Nowadays YP's are relocating because they like the vibe of a place along with the prospects of getting a job.

The major affliction the area has in attracting businesses is the image problem. Detroit is not viewed as a metropolis even capable of thriving (and by Detroit I mean all 8 counties). Most of the people I meet don't even recall a Detroit that ever thrived. Believe it or not, image is everything. Taxes in Michigan are not higher than they are on either of the coasts. New York City has a personal income tax just like the city of Detroit (along with a shitload of other taxes, fees, expensive housing, etc).

Being the home of Automation Alley has proven not to mean much of anything in the grand scheme of things. Suburban tilted development is something Detroit should have gotten out of in the early 90s like everybody else.
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Thejesus
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 3:02 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Neither Troy NOR Detroit are attracting out of state people at the moment...but Troy attracts more of them than Detroit does, which means Troy has less to improve before it can attract them in great numbers...

What's good for Troy is good for Detroit at this point...the region is facing all these issues together....

I've said it before and I will say it to you again...you have to shed the "us v. them" that so many of you have of the suburbs and grasp so dearly for the good of the city, the region and the state...
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Danindc
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 3:12 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As someone who left SE Michigan for elsewhere:

Iheartthed is right on the money. I was offered a job in Detroit (that actually paid better than my first job in DC), but I knew I wasn't going to be happy. I wanted an urban lifestyle, which meant a lot of things that were not readily available in Detroit. Helping Troy isn't going to do anything--there are identical suburbs in every major metropolitan area. Troy = Tysons Corner = Schaumburg = bleccch.

Image, nothing. It's the reality that is far more important. Like the reality of living in a city, and still having to own a car, or the reality of spending $3000 a year on car insurance. Or the reality of having to drive miles out to the suburbs to buy clothes. And then there's the reality of a region so sparsely settled that it's incredibly hard to meet other people in your peer group.

Until Detroit, and by that I mean the entire region, can start addressing these things, it will continue to watch its college graduates flock to cities that have already figured these things out.
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Iheartthed
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 3:16 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Neither Troy NOR Detroit are attracting out of state people at the moment...but Troy attracts more of them than Detroit does, which means Troy has less to improve before it can attract them in great numbers... "

The question is who is Troy attracting, for what reasons and for how long?

I'm really not thinking of this as an us vs. them mindset. It is my honest opinion, as a person who has visited some of the most successful regions of this country (and currently lives in arguably THE most successful of these places). Time and time again the major differences between these regions and Detroit is the divestment and neglect of the core city. Can you name any state that is thriving around a rotted out core city?
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Wazootyman
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 3:29 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I live in Metro Detroit. I left a job in the area for another offer with a growing company also in the area. I graduated college in 2004. I own a house in the suburbs and balance my entertainment spending between the city and the 'burbs. Also, I drive a GM vehicle. I love rolling down the windows and DRIVING my car in this spring weather. I love where I live.

Why is it that the people with the strongest negative opinions about Metro Detroit on this board don't even live here, yet feel like constantly reminding those of us who do how bad things are? Just because the Detroit News uses phrases such as PAIN FAR FROM OVER, BLOW TO REGION, MANUFACTURERS STRUGGLE, ECONOMY GOES TO SHIT, it doesn't mean that we're all unemployed and depressed. Believe it or not, some of us still get paid.

Sorry, Danindc, but your posts tend to just really piss me off. We'll try to install rail stations, bus stops and urban hipster hangouts until this area is a goddamn utopia. Until then, enjoy DC, and stop telling us what's wrong with where we live.
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Thejesus
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 3:31 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No, I can't name one, and I don't need to since, as I stated earlier, I'm not advocating neglecting Detroit...
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Danindc
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 3:44 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, Wazootyman, I'm sorry that you feel like I'm passing judgment on you. I've clearly stated that I knew Detroit could not give me what I desired. I think what I've stated is pretty self-evident. It's not something I created, or happened as a result of me leaving, so spare me the grief.

You are an exception to the rule. Most college graduates aren't looking to buy a house in the suburbs by age 25. You're entitled to that. But don't tell me to piss off, while people wonder why Detroit suffers compared to other regions. Unless you've actually lived somewhere else for a while, you wouldn't actually know just how large the gap is.

I think Detroit should--and CAN--close the gap. But people like you who don't open their eyes to the rest of the world are going to keep pretending everything is okay, until it's just too damn late.
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Patrick
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 3:53 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I thought I read that Indiana pays college grads to stay in the state after they graduate. Create some sort of incentive for grads to stay. hell, offer free housing, monies....something beyond the Cool City bullshit.
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Darwinism
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 4:18 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Any positive changes initiated by us today will benefit our children or grandchildren. Stop being so overly optimistic, because the 'amenities' that you see in other urban centers were started by our father's or grandfather's generations.

If you are seeking to fulfill your objectives of living an urban action-packed lifestyle, I don't blame you for leaving this place. I have a few friends who had packed up and relocated just within the past 12-18 months. I understand.

If you are determined to change Detroit, be prepared to put in your lifetime of effort with absolutely no expectations ..... because the odds are you will not be around to see the peak results of your hardwork. I commend you for your dedication because I know my children and grandchildren will be grateful to you.
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Pffft
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 4:23 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes Wazootyman...

We're wrong to enjoy life here in SE Michigan, because Danindc says so...and besides, as he tells you, we're the only ones who get paychecks and are happy! My feeling has always been, people underestimate Michigan and SE Michigan, so what, they don't know what we have here (beautiful north, lakes, affordable housing), so we'll keep it our secret. People like Dan have to continually justify their decision to leave.
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Deandub11
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 4:34 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Meanwhile, I go to school in Chicago...which is nice and all, but im running straight back to Metro Deetroit when im done in a year. There are many problems and viewpoints that must be changed to turn this around, but I think the area as a whole as a cultural feel and attitude that I just dont see in Chicago. This place is sooo bland. On the other hand there is a lot that can be learned from Chicago.
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Danindc
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 4:51 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

We're wrong to enjoy life here in SE Michigan, because Danindc says so...and besides, as he tells you, we're the only ones who get paychecks and are happy! My feeling has always been, people underestimate Michigan and SE Michigan, so what, they don't know what we have here (beautiful north, lakes, affordable housing), so we'll keep it our secret. People like Dan have to continually justify their decision to leave.



Thanks for putting words in my mouth. I don't believe I ever said that you don't have a right to be happy living in Michigan. Way to take everything personally, though. If there's anything you can count on, it's a Midwesterner taking every comment as a personal attack.

On the other hand, there are plenty of folks on this forum who assume anyone who leaves Michigan, well golly gee, they MUST be stupid--don't they know they can buy a house for $100k? Why the need to be so provincial, guys? You can survey new college grads from Michigan schools, and ask them where they're going. They're certainly not moving to Chicago and the coasts because of the Kool-Aid I've been feeding 'em. They're voting with their feet.

Most people who leave Michigan are pretty well aware of what it has to offer. You may want to think about how much sense that last comment makes.
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Pffft
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 5:30 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dan,
For someone so delighted to have shaken the dust of Michigan off their shoes, you spend an inordinate amount of time on a website devoted to Detroit, Michigan.

Isn't there some hipster cafe you should be discovering, or some fantastic $500k apartment?
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Danny
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 5:35 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The unemployment rate in Michigan for 2007 is now 6.4% down from 7.0% last year. So you see, Granholm is bringing jobs here. YAY!!!! That would fuel some economic growth.
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Upinottawa
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 5:38 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Pffft, that comment is ad hominem.

No one should suggest that Metro Detroit or Michigan is a horrible place to live (nor do I believe that anyone has said this). That being said, this thread is about attracting young, educated people to the area. A vibrant central city with strong, sustainable suburbs would go a long way to achieve this goal. In doing so, more investment (both public and private) needs to be made in Detroit proper.
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Danindc
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 5:39 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

For someone so delighted to have shaken the dust of Michigan off their shoes, you spend an inordinate amount of time on a website devoted to Detroit, Michigan.



Yes, I do spend an inordinate amount of time here. I'm a big fan of Detroit--especially its architecture and its history. Perhaps one day, I'll have some money where I can buy properties and renovate them. Is that a crime?

quote:

Isn't there some hipster cafe you should be discovering, or some fantastic $500k apartment?



Nope. I don't do the hipster thing, and I'm not in the market to buy a condo. Sorry to disappoint your prejudices.

I'm sorry, I'm a bit confused here. I missed the part where my geographic location has anything to do with a very objective report on the state of Southeastern Michigan's economy. Can someone rational explain?

If I had to guess, xenophobic attitudes and prejudices might be a reason why people don't locate to Detroit so much. It's not terribly inviting to people looking for a comfortable place to live or do business. Just a thought....
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Wazootyman
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 5:41 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, Danindc, I'll tell you what. Part of the problem is that instead of actually doing something to help Detroit, you're just passing judgement from 500 miles away. You chose to bypass the region for selfish reasons. That's your right. To be fair (or unfair?), I've never particularily heard much about DC, other than it's full of politicians and crime; it's a place I'd never even consider unless I was looking for a political career. But to stay in Metro Detroit, even if it's not the enlightened answer, is supporting Detroit. I work every day for an R & D firm, advancing the regional economy, which above everything else is the driving force to recovery.

You are correct though, I have not had permanent residence in another region. I did live in East Lansing for four years, but that only "sorta" counts, as college isn't really representative of real life. The ability to walk or bike to all daily destinations was neat, I'll give you that.

I was dead set on living in NYC at one point, and gave it serious thoughts every time I travelled with my friend to stay at his aunt's place in Brooklyn for a week in the spring. I now have friends who live in NYC, Syracuse, Tampa, Boston and Houston. All of them say they're satisfied with where they live, but that they want to move back to Detroit some day. The lack of hiring employers at the time of their graduation was the sole cause that chased them away. It wasn't the lack of busses.

I believe a major problem with the discussion on this board is that people like you believe that true urban living is the ideal that everyone is reaching for. It's great for many - but don't ever assume that it's the answer for everyone. I can tell you for a fact that I really enjoy standing in my driveway, conversing with neighbors. I don't mind driving to work, the gym or to dinner out. My neighborhood is laid out such that I can be social, or isolated. I can get away from people and noise if I want...something that is sometimes, but not always possible in an urban setting. I can have a dozen friends over, and they can park right in front of my door. We can light up the fireplace on my backyard patio on summer nights.

I'm not saying all of this isn't possible in another region, but I'm asking how my choice to remain in (suburban) Detroit has negatively impacted my life. Because, really, I think Metro Detroit is a lot better than people want to give it credit for. Why don't I live in Detroit? I personally prefer the suburban lifestyle. I don't dislike the city...I love spending time in Detroit proper, but I also really like where I live.

You say most recent college grads aren't interested in owning a house, but most of my friends are envious and would like to own a house as soon as possible. An investment in real estate, as opposed to rent, really feels like an accomplishment. It's something that will really pay off in the long-run - having true equity as opposed to just a checkbook ledger full of rent payments.

I guess I don't understand your point, unless you're suggesting I should immediately move to realize just how bad I have it right now. Okay, so I'm being a smart-ass, but you get the point.
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Upinottawa
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 5:50 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Not everyone wants to live in an urban environment and not everyone who wants to live in an urban environment will want to do so for their entire life.

That being said, Detroit (and Metro Detroit) provide few options that mix vibrant city living and low crime. This fact certainly hurts the region when it comes to retaining or luring young graduates.
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Eric
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Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 5:59 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

quote:

As much as I'd like to see significant investment in Detroit, I wouldn't place it any higher or more likely to help out the Michigan economy than significant investment in other places such as Southfield, Troy, Livonia, Royal Oak, etc...



I disagree Detroit and the other major cites of the state should be a higher priority. Even business leaders, like Dieter Zetsche echoed the difficulty in attracting talent to the state due to Detroit's condition. It was one of the reasons Comerica listed why its moving to Dallas. So it's just not provincial Detroiters pushing this.

The truth is few things in this state really operate independent of Detroit. Our ability to sell Troy and Southfield, is only as strong as our ability to sell Detroit. It doesn't matter how much nicer these places are, because it always comes back to Detroit's condition real and perceived. Companies won't relocate when they can go to a region with a functioning mass transit system. College grads won't come here, because other cities offer more vibrant urban scenes and the improvements in what we do offer go largely unrecognized.

This isn't about the state writing bigger checks, but forming policy that makes Detroit more attractive. Christ, we can't get legislation through that'd allow DDOT and SMART to merge. We need start to treating our cites like assets

(Message edited by eric on March 30, 2007)
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Danindc
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Username: Danindc

Post Number: 2271
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 6:11 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

^Exactly what he said.

What I promote is nothing more than restoring Detroit, not reinventing. For those who want the suburban lifestyle, SE Michigan already offers the whole gamut. If you want an urban lifestyle, you're pretty much SOL, so you have to move somewhere else. This, of course, is changing, but not nearly as rapidly as in other regions.

I personally detest the suburban way of life, so I chose to move somewhere where I can have an urban lifestyle. Please don't begrudge me that. You would be surprised at the similarities. It's just a slightly different flavor, and an adjusted set of priorities.

If Detroit is going to be able to fully exploit the full range of people, it has to offer the full range of lifestyle choices. Things are moving in the right direction, and I'm optimistic. As someone who loves cities, Detroit is an incredibly fascinating place, so pardon my indulgence, even if I do live 500 miles away. You may call that distance, but I call it perspective.
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Pffft
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Username: Pffft

Post Number: 1247
Registered: 12-2003
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 8:24 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ottawa,

I was ad hominem tweaking, yes.

I just know D.C. pretty well, and in fact have a friend who desperately wants to return to Detroit from there, but open slots in his expertise don't come up that often.

Driving home on a beautiful evening, seeing people smile and laugh despite living in a horrible place where more people drive than walk was pretty nice.

As Wazooty says, there's a long tradition of people loving the city but wanting a little more space and quiet. Living where there's more space, but taking your recreation and entertainment in the city is quality of life for a lot of people -- and it's always been that way in Detroit.
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Hugo8100
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Username: Hugo8100

Post Number: 28
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 8:31 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Go to dice.com and click on Detroit. Over a 1,000 tech job openings in metro Detroit. As the article says, those that have a marketable degree or skill are going to do just fine.
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Wazootyman
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Username: Wazootyman

Post Number: 194
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Friday, March 30, 2007 - 9:57 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hugo8100 - I've been meaning to ask...is this the Hugo from Bailey? I lived with "B" if that tells you who I am...
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Hugo8100
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Username: Hugo8100

Post Number: 29
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 31, 2007 - 12:59 pm: Edit PostDelete PostMove Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello Wazootyman! It's nice to see a familiar face around here.

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