Discuss Detroit » Hall of Fame Threads » Old Car Factories » Old Car Factories - 24
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Hornwrecker
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Username: Hornwrecker

Post Number: 1522
Registered: 04-2005
Posted From: 66.2.148.144
Posted on Tuesday, August 29, 2006 - 12:22 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The Sanborn for Silverstine's!

1949, around 6660 E SIX MILE.

Silverstine's 1949 Detroit
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Livedog2
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Post Number: 1051
Registered: 03-2006
Posted From: 24.223.133.177
Posted on Tuesday, August 29, 2006 - 1:19 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Did Tucker or Auburn ever have manufacturing plants in Detroit?

Livedog2
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56packman
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Post Number: 553
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 65.185.132.134
Posted on Tuesday, August 29, 2006 - 3:42 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

NO-Tucker's 50 (well, around 53) cars were made at a former WWII aircraft plant in Chicago, leased by Chrysler to Tucker. Auburn automobiles were built in Auburn, Indiana, in the plant behind the factory administration facility that is now the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg museum in Auburn. next weekend is the annual ACD reunion in Auburn, I'll be there on Saturday to see the ACD cars in the park, then the auction hooey at the Kruse park south of town in the afternoon. Some Auburn bodies were built in Connersville, IN,, where Cords were built. Duesenberg had their factory in Indianapolis. At one time Indiana had five automobile manufacturers. They had:
Auburn
Cord
Duesenberg--all of the above were under the ownership of E.L. Cord (he bought Auburn and Duesenberg, started Cord)

Marmon (Indianopolis)
Studebaker (South Bend)

(Message edited by 56packman on August 30, 2006)
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Cambrian
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Username: Cambrian

Post Number: 59
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Posted From: 69.246.123.152
Posted on Wednesday, August 30, 2006 - 4:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What's the skinny on the ACD museum? I'm thinking about checking it out this weekend.
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Livernoisyard
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Post Number: 1325
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Posted From: 69.242.223.42
Posted on Wednesday, August 30, 2006 - 4:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

1947 was when Ford died. So it seems that the major reason for still building farm tractors was Ford's desire to make them. He dies... no more tractor production.
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56packman
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Post Number: 558
Registered: 12-2005
Posted From: 129.9.163.233
Posted on Thursday, August 31, 2006 - 6:47 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cambrian--the ACD museum is fantastic. It is the original 1933 headquarters/showroom that ACD built, beautifully restored, stocked with very significant cars and artifacts. The "scream-dream" art deco design (TRUE art deco) has been well preserved, and restored. This weekend is going to be a madhouse with the festival--hundreds of thousands of people coming into town. If you can hang with that, and all of the minor inconvniences that go with it, you'll have a good time--if not, you may wish to go some other weekend. While you are there, check out the Auburn hotel (right downtown, across from the courthouse) it is a 1920's small two-story hotel, that has remained virtually unchanged since it opened. It is only open one week a year,this week, and is where all of the ACD club diehards stay. There is a common bathroom at the end of the hall, none in the guest rooms (as used to be the case with old, small hotels) it's right out of "the Shining". The old guy from Indiana who owned it for decades died a few years back, and an ACD club guy from NY state bought the place to keep it as-is, and he has actually fixed some parts up.

check out the museum at www.acdmuseum.org
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Iowaboy
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Post Number: 24
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Posted From: 150.148.0.28
Posted on Thursday, August 31, 2006 - 12:55 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ford and Ferguson parted ways in 1947. Tractor production did not stop; Ford continued to make tractors for many years after that. Ferguson set up his own assembly plant in Detroit.
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31ford
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Post Number: 279
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Posted From: 65.35.101.203
Posted on Saturday, September 02, 2006 - 2:09 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

the 8N, 9N, NAA, Golden Jubilee etc......
I wouldn't mind having a 9N Ford Tractor to go along with my old Fords....
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Cambrian
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Post Number: 85
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Posted From: 75.10.91.78
Posted on Friday, September 08, 2006 - 2:07 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

ACD Museum and the Parade were fantastic! We had such a wonderful time. Great suggestion 56PackMan! The truck museum behind the ACD museum was cool too. I loved the Interational Harvester Truck collection they had in the basement. At that museum there was a 1945 Massey Harris Combine Parts Catalog, they listed thier HQs in Racine WI. No plants in Detroit, that must have been where Ferguson came in to the picture in 1947?
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Hornwrecker
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Post Number: 1587
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Posted From: 66.19.22.135
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 10:16 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't think that this Fisher Body factory on Clay, near the GTW RR tracks has been covered before. This is from the 1915 Sanborn map, the plant across the tracks is the Detroit White Lead Co. I'm guessing that where it was is now under Hamtramack Drive, around the Poletown factory.

Fisher Body Clay Ave 1915

This looks like it was the main body assembly facility, with both wood and metal working; also an area for soldering/lead filling the body joints.

I haven't been able to find anything more on this.

Link to Fisher Body page:

http://www.geocities.com/sponcom26/index.html
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Mikem
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Post Number: 2828
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Posted From: 68.43.15.105
Posted on Monday, September 11, 2006 - 11:58 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No we haven't covered this one before, and I can't find anything either. Here are aerials from 1949,1981, and 2003:

49

81

03

http://terraserver-usa.com/image.aspx?T=4&S=10&Z=17&X=1654&Y=23470&W=3

The clearing of Poletown is well under way in 1981 and that's the Jewish cemetery preserved in the bottom right corner. I suspect this isn't the same building or else it had been extensively altered prior to 1949. Maybe Fisher was on that empty triangle to the west of this factory.

The only listing I have in Polks (1940) for that stretch of Clay is for a Racine Foundry & Manufacturing Co at 2301 Clay. In the '46 Yellow Pages, they claim to be "One of the largest non-ferrous jobbing foundries in the state". By 1961, they had moved to 6463 E Warren, near the south end of the Packard complex, and in 1967 they can be found at 831 E Lewiston, Ferndale (perhaps just the office and the dirty work was still being done in the city). Going the other way in time to 1925, they were located at 6535 Dubois, between Milwaukee and E Grand Boulevard. Either they moved into Fisher in the late '20s/early '30s when Fisher moved on, or they were located next door and Fisher was long gone even before 1949.
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Hornwrecker
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Username: Hornwrecker

Post Number: 1589
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Posted From: 66.19.22.135
Posted on Tuesday, September 12, 2006 - 12:12 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think that the Fisher Clay Ave plant was that empty triangle, where the semi trailers are parked in that second photo, going by the street arrangements. I'll have another look at the maps to see what the other plant was to the east of this one.

Interesting, not often we come up with something like this anymore, since this thread started.

Another thing is that this factory doesn't have a number, like the others in the area and from this time period. This was a large factory, 3 stories, and from what I gather from looking at the operations they did there, it was a final coachwork ing plant, with extensive lumber drying and storage.

(Message edited by Hornwrecker on September 12, 2006)
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Kathleen
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Post Number: 1572
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Posted From: 69.14.122.57
Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 7:14 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He gleans auto industry's story: Royal Oak author sets up book fair

"Charlie Hyde never imagined he'd grow up prowling through decaying factories, 19th-Century lighthouses and Upper Peninsula copper mines.

When teachers asked students what they wanted to be, Hyde did not answer industrial archaeologist.

But that is what he has become. It is the kind of quirky profession that allows Hyde, 61, of Royal Oak to study such matters as the X-rated bathroom graffiti at the old Dodge Main factory in Hamtramck.

His love for auto-history arcana has led him to organize a gathering of automobile authors this Saturday at the Skillman branch of the Detroit Public Library. Hyde, a history professor at Wayne State University, says he and others arranged the event to celebrate the region's automotive historians and draw public attention to the library's prestigious National Automotive History Collection.

From noon to 4 p.m., 22 authors of books on cars, trucks, airplanes and ships will gather at the Automotive History Authors Day and Book Fair to talk about their work and sell and sign their books.

Hyde will be among them, having written nine books; his latest is on the Dodge brothers. It's a trade he grew interested in after moving to Detroit and discovering the old factories.

"I was face-to-face with the physical remains of Detroit's auto industry when it was at the peak of its prosperity, and that really led me into learning more," he said.

...
One of his stranger experiences was at the Dodge Main plant in fall 1981, months after the workers left. He found tools and clothes and Christmas trees left behind. ..."

Full article at: http://www.freep.com/apps/pbcs .dll/article?AID=/20060913/NEW S03/609130382/1005

For a complete list of authors slated to appear, see my August 23rd posting above.
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Cambrian
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Post Number: 92
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Posted From: 75.10.91.78
Posted on Wednesday, September 13, 2006 - 2:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I met an interesting old fellow last weekend who told me he took GM's buyout package last June and finally decided to retire after 64 years of service. This means he would have opted for war time production work instead of war duty. He's gotta have some interesting stories to tell.
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Bob_cosgrove
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 10:17 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As a result of having his photograph taken by newspaper photographers in front of historic structures that were later demolished, Charlie Hyde among his historian friends is kiddingly known as the "Dr. Kevorkian of Historic Preservation."

Bob Cosgrove
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Mikem
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Post Number: 2843
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Posted on Friday, September 15, 2006 - 10:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Funny. Maybe I'll have him sign my copy of "Riding the Roller Coaster" as Dr Hyde.

Thanks for the heads up Kathleen.
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Burnsie
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Post Number: 621
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Posted on Saturday, September 16, 2006 - 4:48 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ford made tractors at HP until 1973, and elsewhere (where?) until the business was spun off (by then called Ford-New Holland) in 1991 to FIAT.

Sven77 asked about Flint and Lansing old car factories-- oh man, a whole super-thread could be written about that. I know this is a Detroit board but it's impossible to separate the history of Flint and Lansing GM plants from Detroit.

The Flint V8 Engine Plant (opened ca. '53 by Chevy) was torn down several years ago. Partially on its site is the new L6/V6 Flint Engine South plant. The Flint Truck Plant (originally Chevy Flint Assembly / Fisher Body 2) opened in 1947. Flint Metal Center (originally Chevy Frame & Stamping) opened in '53 or '54.

The oldest factories remaining in Flint are at Delphi East (ex-AC Spark Plug) and GM Powertrain Flint North (ex-Buick). Delphi has a few buildings dating to the '20s, and the first factory built after GM was incorporated in 1908 is at GMPT Flint North (although closed for a couple years now). Well over half the floor space at Flint North/Buick City has been demolished. The other auto plants in the Flint area:

GM Flint Tool & Die (Plant 38): One of only two remaining buildings at Chevy in the Hole (where Chevrolet assembly and Fisher #2 originally were). The other is Building 35 (where the first Corvette prototype was built), which was gutted, expanded, and turned into a fuel cell research facility for Kettering Univ.

GM Grand Blanc Metal Center: Now basically just a weld tool center. This was built to build tanks in WWII, and later was operated by Fisher Body.

GM SPO Flint: Opened ca. 1959 as Chevrolet National Parts Distribution. Later the world HQ of GM Parts Division.

Fisher Body #1 closed in '87 and was torn down except for the Admin. Bldg. and several buildings which were gutted and turned into the Great Lakes Technology Centre.

AC Spark Plug Industrial Ave. Plant closed circa '75 and was torn down.

Ternstedt Coldwater Rd. Plant (built ca. 53 to make jet engines for Buick for the Korean War, never used for that purpose and later operated by Fisher Body / Fisher Guide / Inland Fisher Guide / Delphi / Peregrine) has been torn down.

As for Lansing:

Lansing Car Assembly Plant #1 (Oldsmobile downtown plants) is in the process of being demolished, except for the (1960's-built) administration buildings, some space in which is empty and some of it is used by the 2001-opened Lansing Grand River Caddy (Plant 7). LGR required the demolition of some old Oldsmobile buildings, and the rest is getting obliterated now. There's some pretty old stuff getting knocked down.

Fisher Body (bought by GM in '35, originally Durant Motors)/ LCA Plant #6 is also being completely demolished.

GM SPO Lansing (Oldsmobile Plant 4, built ca. '59) is still in use.

Olds Delta Twp. Diesel (Plant 5, opened ca. '81) closed a few years back and has been remodeled by Ryder Logistics.

Lansing Craft Centre (Olds Forge, Plant 2, opened in 1940's using older factories from a non-GM firm), closed this year and is presently mothballed.

Lansing Metal Center (Olds Plant 3, opened ca. '52 and made jet engine parts) is down to around 300 employees and will close later this year.

Lansing/Delta Regional Stamping (Plant 8) opened in 2003.

Lansing/Delta Assembly (Plant 9) will swing into production by the end of the year.
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Mikem
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Post Number: 2851
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Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 - 12:58 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://detnews.com/apps/pbcs.d ll/article?AID=/20060916/ENT01 /609160399/1033

What: Travel back in time and visit the birthplace of the Model T at the Ford Piquette Plant, the only early Detroit auto factory that remains open to visitors. See where automotive pioneers Henry Ford, the Dodge Brothers, James Couzens and others spent long hours developing ideas. You'll also have a chance to learn about other models built by Ford, and visit the third floor, which hasn't been painted since Ford Motor Company left in 1910.

When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Oct. 7 and 14.

Where: Ford Piquette Plant, 411 Piquette

www.tplex.org
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Scrippsbooth
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Posted on Wednesday, September 20, 2006 - 1:51 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Burnsie - Concerning Flint's Fisher Body Plant No. 2 that came on line in 1947, do you know what part of the Chevrolet Assembly plant it occupied? Perhaps the whole second floor? Who owned this Fisher facility - Chevrolet or Fisher?

(Message edited by Scrippsbooth on September 20, 2006)
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Hhilliker
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Posted on Thursday, September 21, 2006 - 7:42 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello all. I have been trying to find information about old Detroit car factories for a while with no luck. I am so glad that I found this forum. I grew up around the Flint and Detroit areas and have always been interested how the automobile industry has shaped and changed these cities forever. Mostly, I have always been interested in the glory days. I have been writing a movie set in 1930's Detroit. I have a few scenes that take place in or around car factories. The only problem is I don't know which ones were open at the time and where they were. I need some really great suggestions of the ones that are the most impressive to you all. I also need to know historically what streets they were on and what they specifically made. If anyone could help me I would appreciate it so very very much.
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Lowell
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Posted on Thursday, September 21, 2006 - 8:00 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hhilliker, Packard would be a good setting for you. It still largely exist as it was in the 1930's and was a luxury car. You could actually walk around it and gather a lot of detail and context.

If you look at Hornwrecker's post 1491 above you see some old shots of it. The bottom pick is as it is today -- minus the cars and a few windows. The left half and bridges in the second picture are destroyed in the 2002 halted demolition, not sure where the third is from. See packard in this site.

http://detroityes.com/webisode s/2002/packard/021025-01Packar dRubble.htm
and here:
http://detroityes.com/industry /22packard.htm

Welcome to the forum.
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56packman
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Posted on Friday, September 22, 2006 - 6:33 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hhilliker--I'm the Packard idiot savant on the forum, and Lowell is leading you in a good direction. I can give you any historical background you need. You can contact me off-list at 56packman (at) twmi (dot) rr (dot) com.

"Ask the man who owns one"
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Kathleen
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Post Number: 1593
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Posted on Friday, September 22, 2006 - 7:03 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Speaking of Packard...

Open House at the Packard Proving Grounds Historic Site, Sunday, October 15, 1-5pm. Free admission. Located on Van Dyke between 22 and 23 Mile Rds., Shelby Township. For more info, call 586-739-4800.

http://www.packardmotorfdn.org /index.htm
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Randy_g
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Posted on Sunday, September 24, 2006 - 8:11 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Need more Ideas just click the classic tour and see the packard plant up close and personal for the internet. keep up the great work guys
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Hhilliker
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Posted on Monday, September 25, 2006 - 6:34 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lowell, thank you for your great suggestion. I have been looking into it. 56packman, I will be contacting you when I come up with a great list of questions. Thank you for the offer. I am really excited to be a part of this forum.
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Hhilliker
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Posted on Wednesday, October 04, 2006 - 5:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm also trying to find some street maps of Detroit from 1939 and I've been having trouble. Would any of you happen to know where I could find one?
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Bob_cosgrove
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Post Number: 385
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Posted on Thursday, October 05, 2006 - 1:28 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Model T's in front of Edsel & Eleanor Ford home

The Model T Club associated with the Piquette Avenue Henry Ford Plant (T-Plex) had its annual BBQ and awards meeting last Saturday (September 30) at Edsel & Eleanor Ford's first home in Indian Village on a wet and rainy day.

The attached photo shows the Model T's lined up in front of the Ford home.

Bob Cosgrove
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Hornwrecker
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Post Number: 1660
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Posted on Thursday, October 05, 2006 - 9:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hhilliker, they occasionally show up for sale on ebay in the collectibles section, or John King Books might be a local source for them; I think they also have a web site listing thing.

I've got a 1930s map, but it is currently falling apart. A lot of these maps aren't dated, so you have to guess when they were printed by recognizing when things changed.

Anything specific you are looking for, or just want one for your own use?
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Iowaboy
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Posted on Sunday, October 08, 2006 - 7:35 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is the way it seems from old magazine advertisements. Hupp moved into the building on East Milwaukee Avenue in 1912. They changed their name from Hupp Motor Car Company to Hupp Motor Car Corporation during the timeframe 1915 to 1917. From the various "agent" photos, the wood sign by the door said Hupp Motor Car Co, while the sign on the door said Hupp Motor Car Corporation. So I figure the "agent" photos were taken soon after the name change (unless they just never bothered the change the sign by the door.
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Scrippsbooth
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Posted on Sunday, October 08, 2006 - 11:29 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bill Cuthbert in his Hupp book writes the name change from company to Corp. took place on November 19, 1915 when Hupp raised the capital stock from $1,000,000 to 6,500,000.
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Cambrian
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Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 1:44 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I took a leisurely drive back from the Toledo toy show today and wound up in Saline. What was the big plant on Michigan Ave that is now Automotive Holdings? Former Visteon nee Ford plant?
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Fortress_warren
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Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 4:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Does anyone know which plants were located in Detroit proper in 1976? I can remember Lynch Road, Jefferson, Cadillac. Were there others?

The Saline plant I think made wiring harnesses. Van Dyke did as well.

We used to ride our dirtbikes out in Shelby, there were long piles of foundry slag about 10' tall. These were a quarter mile long. They had been there for quite a while, 6" diameter trees were growing in them. This was in 72. Somebody told me Ford dumped it there. Is this on or near the Packard grounds?
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Cambrian
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Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 4:10 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Talking just assembly plants, or engine, tool and die parts plants too? There was Vernor Tool and Die, (Chrysler), The Dodge viper plant is south of Eight Mile, don't know what that was building in '76.
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Mikeg
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Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 6:30 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Fortress_warren, Here is a 1949 aerial view of the southwest corner of 22 Mile Rd. and Shelby Road (the Packard test track is visible at the upper right corner). Are these long rows the slag piles you used to ride on?

1949 aerial view

Today, this corner is the site of apartment buildings and single-family homes surrounding a pair of small lakes.

ca. 2002 aerial view
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Jimaz
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Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 7:15 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mikeg, in case it helps, those are railroad tracks west of those lakes.
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Hornwrecker
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Post Number: 1671
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Posted on Monday, October 09, 2006 - 8:53 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

The Dodge viper plant is south of Eight Mile, don't know what that was building in '76.




That was formerly a Champion Sparkplug factory near Conner, I think it was built around 1970, so they didn't use it very long. They used to make the ceramic cores for the plugs there.

Fortress_ So far there are over 550 factories of various types in the OCF db. I have to start updating it again so we can post it somewhere, sometime (?).
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Fortress_warren
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Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 10:17 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, that's them. I wonder what they did with all that slag? You couldn't grow anything in it, it was like crushed glass. I buy this stuff called Green Diamond for use in the sandblaster and bead blast cabinet. It's supposed to be recycled slag. That pile would have been enough for the whole country.

I was looking at the wikipedia entry on Coleman A. Young, they mentioned that after about 1950 there wasn't anything of size built in Detroit. It all went into the burbs. It all "Hit 8 mile Road" and kept on going.

Hornwrecker, are you a librarian? They are trained for this kind of research. Plus they have access to stuff that the rest of us riff-raff don't. The girlfriend at the time I was riding there is a librarian. Her cousin lived on a street that dead-ended into that pile.

I got knocked off the bike by a tree that was like a lance, caught me right, dead-center, in the crotch. I must be stupid, still ride.
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Psip
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Post Number: 1234
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Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 12:52 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Aero Willis

and the show open it came from:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1957379043681891468
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Iowaboy
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Post Number: 42
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Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 7:28 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hornwrecker, I have some information for you if you care to e-mail me at johniwen@yahoo.com
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Aiw
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Post Number: 5927
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Posted on Monday, October 23, 2006 - 4:24 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I recieved an e-mail today that solves the mystery of this factory I posted somewhere back waaay earlier...




quote:

The photo is not from Detroit but rather from Flint. It shows what
was built as the W. F. Stewart Body Company factory on the southeast
corner of Industrial Avenue and Hamilton Avenue. The building of which
you can just see a window on the left is Weston-Mott, and the small office
building just to the right of that is the main office of the Buick Motor
Company. If I’m correct, this photo dates to around 1913, when other
panoramic photos were taken at the complex. Also, that particular old
Buick office building was built around 1906 and demolished/replaced around
1917.




The person who wrote me the answer is an avid Buick historian, and will likely be joining us soon...
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Hornwrecker
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Post Number: 1685
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, October 23, 2006 - 9:45 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for clearing that up, I spent some time looking it over, enlarging parts of it trying to figure out where it was, and failing. Nice to finally know, and that I'm not totally inept.
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Aiw
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Post Number: 5928
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Posted on Monday, October 23, 2006 - 9:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You and me both... :-)
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Sven1977
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Post Number: 199
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Posted on Friday, November 03, 2006 - 1:20 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Someone has probably listed this site before, but I stumbled across a Detroit Library collection of automobile photos. There are 999 pictures of just Packards.
http://mmm.lib.msu.edu/search/ browsedisplay.cfm?t=2&subcol=9 38
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56packman
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Post Number: 695
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, November 03, 2006 - 1:49 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sven-that is the Packard photographic collection at the NAHC, digitized by MSU. Those photos only exist today because of the late, great Dick Teague "stole" from the front offices of Packard during what he later called "the last days in the bunker". I told that story in a previous OCF post. been there, worshipped that.
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 12:40 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Greetings! I'm the avid Buick historian Aiw mentioned a couple of posts ago. I'm looking for some help in locating some information, maybe a Sanborn map, of the Buick Manufacturing Company from 1901-1902. It was located at 416-418 Howard Street. From what I can tell through looking at other maps on this site, that may have been across the street from St. Anne's Church.

While I'm discussing early Buick history in Detroit, I thought I'd clarify an address for Buick Auto-Vim that I've seen on this site a few times. I noticed a discrepancy where some publications list 39 Beaubien while others list 139 Beaubien. According to Larry Gustin, well known Buick historian, he identified 139 as the address based on a Detroit phone directory. However, in the first through fifth editions of his The Buick: A Complete History, a typo resulted in it being shown as 39. This was corrected in the sixth edition and in his subsequent book on David Buick. The outstanding question, though, is whether this puts it in the Boydell Building, as has been suggested, or not? Any maps out there to confirm?
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 12:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's a vintage 1902 engraving of the Boydell Building as well:
Boydell Building, ca. 1902
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Kathleen
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Post Number: 1684
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 1:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Welcome, Kkirbitz, to the Forum and to the Old Car Factories thread.

From research I did using the city directories, I believe that the Buick address on Beaubien does put them near or at the Boydell Building. I remember thinking that the David Buick historical marker that was installed on Atwater should have been up in front of or attached to the Boydell Building.

It would be great to have some confirmation of that fact.
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Bate
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 1:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Aiw tipped me to this on his site. http://maps.live.com/ is the new msn maps offering. It blows google maps into the weeds. The maps of Detroit are more current and zoom resolution is amazing. You have to play with the view and double click to peg a location or type the address. Once there try the side-view and it rotates over the point at a 45ish degree angle. I don't think I'll be getting any work done this afternoon.
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Mikem
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Post Number: 2904
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 1:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

416-418 Howard under the old address system would place it on the north side of Howard between 10th & 12th Streets (the addresses on that block ranged from 330-442), and the only Sanborn map I have of that area is from 1921. It shows a collection of buildings belonging to the Mundus Products Co, manufacturers of near beer and soft drinks. Maybe they moved in after Buick left? Farther west on Howard, on the block east of St Anne (across the street?) was a factory of the C.R. Wilson Body Co. It was on the same side of Howard as St Anne; maybe this is being confused with Buick?

Beaubien addresses, pre-1921, ranged from 116-146 between E Fort & E Lafayette which is where the Boydell Building is/was located. I think the original Boydell Building was at the southeast corner of Beaubien and Fort which is now home to a parking garage IIRC.
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Mikem
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 1:51 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

On closer inspection, I see 139 Beaubien would have been in the building at the northeast corner of Beaubien and Lafayette. This building was separate from the main Boydell offices fronting E Fort and was separated by what looks to be an alley. It may have been owned by Boydell because some sections (in 1921) are listed as a "paint ware house". The section of the building where the 139 address number falls is listed as: a machine shop on the 1st and 2nd floors, a paper box factory on the 3rd floor, the 4th as a "leather stockroom", the 5th as "painting", and the 6th floor also as a machine shop. This section of the building is still standing.
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Aiw
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 2:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kkirbitz welcome!

I will check out the Howard address when I get home from work..
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 8:13 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mikem, That's a great description, but now I'm feeling disoriented, so I need to get my bearings on this one. Based on maps from previous posts, the picture above, and what I remember from being at the Boydell Building, I would have put the northeast corner of Beaubien and Lafayette right where Greektown Casino is today. From the engraving and maps, I also would have said that the main Boydel offices were on Champlain (now Lafayette)right about where the streetcar is shown.
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 8:27 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's the Boydell in 2003, as seen from Greektown Casino, along Beaubin (from "David Buick's Marvelous Motor Car.") The location circled is really just a best guess of where Buick Auto-Vim & Power might have been located. However, that's why I'm turning to such a passionate group of historians, to get confirmation!

Boydell Bldg 2003
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Hornwrecker
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Post Number: 1698
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 9:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've changed the address in the db to 139 Beuabien until it is proved otherwise.

Any info on the Buick aircraft engine plant?

Buick #75 Aircraft, 1917, 9416 Ford Rd & Wyoming, page 20 OCF/HOF, WWI aircraft Liberty engines
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 10:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've seen some of the maps for Buick # 75 and I'll do some additional checking of my records. I'm pretty sure that all of the Buick Liberty engines were built in Flint. Maybe this was for planned expansion but the war ended too soon?

Buick is said to have produced it's first closed body limousines, 1910 Model 41, in a plant in Detroit. Does it go back that far?

On a related question, below is a scan from a 1907 Buick catalog showing one of its four factories sites. One was located in Jackson, two in Flint, and this one is unknown. Does it resemble anything in Detroit? Possibly Buick #75?
Unknown 1907 Buick Factory
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 10:40 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm on a bit of a roll tonight, so I'll go for one more. Buick & Sherwood Manufacturing was located on the southeast corner of Meldrum and Champlain (Lafayette.) They also had a plant at 213 to 219 Beaufait. The below is from the 1902 catalog of the Standard Sanitary Manufacturing Compamy showing their Beaufait Avenue factory in Detroit. I'm assuming that it's the former B&S factory.
Buick & Sherwood? 213 to 219 Beaufait

What's really interesting is Mikem's photo of the old Michigan casting plant at 1067 Beaufait, at Lafayette. Look familiar?
Michigan Castings
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 10:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Was that the Buick bathtub casting plant, or whatever it was that they made? It's been awhile since I read about it, so I don't remember.
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Lowell
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 11:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Great find and connection on the Buick & Sherwood Manufacturing / Michigan Casting Kkirbitz; I drive past it every time I return from Belle Isle.

A big welcome to the forum too.
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Mikem
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 11:09 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kkirbitz, I don't know downtown very well but here is a 1921 Sanborn map of the block with the Boydell Company:




The building fronting Fort in the middle of the block is the Boydell Bros White Leads & Color Co. I don't know if this is "the" Boydell Building or not, and the collection of buildings on that block vary from 3 to 8 stories, not a uniform height like the one in your engraving:




The other building on the north side of that block (southwest corner of Lafayete & Beaubien - my previous post was in error) is a collection of shops and warehouses, including a paint warehouse which leads me to believe that Boydell owned this building as well:




A closeup of the east side next to the alley, where 139 Beaubien would fall:




That's my best guess as to where Buick's shop was when it was on Beuabien.
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Mikem
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Posted on Wednesday, November 08, 2006 - 11:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I thought Buick #75 was built by/for the federal government, so it could have been a Liberty factory:



I can't remember where in the chain of ownership it belonged to Saxon:

US Government->Saxon->Buick->LaSalle->DeSoto?

Maybe it was owned and operated by Buick during WWI to build the Liberty and leased to Saxon afterwards. I have another possible source with the answer, but it will be a few weeks before I can follow up on it.
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2006 - 10:21 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mikem, Thanks for the Sanborns. It helps that both new and old numbering is shown. Given the old directory listing showing Buick Auto-Vim & Power at 139 Beaubien, I would call this confirmation that they were indeed located in the still-standing Boydell Building.

In the billhead engraving of the Boydell I posted yesterday, let me add a little more information that was cropped from the scan:
BOYDELL BROTHERS
OFFICE & SHIPPING DEPT. 40, 42, 44, &46 Champlain St.
WORKS 33, 41, &43 Fort St. East
STORE Corner Bates & Congress Streets
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2006 - 10:32 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hornwrecker, Yes, Buick & Sherwood made bathtubs, toilets, tanks, seats, and fixtures. David Buick started getting interested in gasoline engines around 1895 and didn't sell his interests in B&S until 1899. That would lead me to assert that the castings for the first Buick engines were made in the B&S foundry.
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Cambrian
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Post Number: 295
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Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2006 - 1:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sad! Put one of my cars up for sale, the link is in the classified section.
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Sven1977
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Post Number: 200
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Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2006 - 5:05 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a Sanborn map which may show MikeM's casting plant above. Somewhere in all of these pages, I included a Sanborn of the Boydell building in Greektown.
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Aiw
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Post Number: 5980
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Posted on Thursday, November 09, 2006 - 9:39 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


quote:

I'm looking for some help in locating some information, maybe a Sanborn map, of the Buick Manufacturing Company from 1901-1902. It was located at 416-418 Howard Street.




Here's what I came up with for the Howard St. address. It would have been the N.W. corner of Howard & 12th.

Whatever Buick did there, it must have been a very temporary location...

None of the older maps solve your mystery...

1884:

84

410-416 Howard was occupied by the Jacob Darmstaetter Brewery. Basically an ice house and a malt house.

The corner property (all with 12th addresses) was occupied by the W.E. Maloney Brewery.

1897:

97

In 1897 The West Side Brewing Co. could be found occupying 412 & 416 Howard. The brew house being at 412 and the bottling work at 416. They produced 20,000 barrels a year. They also owned and erected a wagon shed across the alley with Abbot St. address (385-387).

The corner property was still owned by the W.F. Moloney Vienna Brewery (much like city directories the spelling and names could vary wildly from year to year). Their addresses were 74,76,78 12th & 420 Howard. 420 was their bottling works. The entire property was surrounded by an 8 foot high brick wall. Moloney only produced 8000 barrels of beer a year.

1921:

21

Buick has by now been and gone from this location.

The property that was 400-412-418 Howard & 379-397 Abbot is now Mundus Products Co. Ltd. Manufacturers of Near Beer and Soft Drinks.

400 Howard Shows an office with a machine shop to the rear. 397 Abbott shows a Machinery Factory. Of note 397 Abbott is listed as a private garage with capacity for 25 cars and trucks.

The building that was 420 in 1897 is gone. The corner property is now home to Lambert & Lowman Manufacturing Chemists.
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Iowaboy
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Posted on Sunday, November 12, 2006 - 7:52 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In 1928 the Hupp Motor Car Corp purchased the Huebner Lumber and Manufacturing Co plant across the street. Business was so good that Hupp was considering future expansion. That is according to Bill Cuthbert in his book The Hupmobile Story. The Huebner water tower is pictured in the background of the photo posted by Hornwrecker, post number 1446, August 19, 2006.
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Aiw
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Post Number: 5996
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Posted on Wednesday, November 15, 2006 - 9:43 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's one...

An executive?



I bought this photo years ago, it was taken by the Manning Brothers. I was wondering if we could ID the man?

Note the munitions on the right. War production?

Also, check the photo over his desk... Some kind of factory:



A zoom in on the plant...




A head detail...



Otherwise, has anyone had any experience with the Manning Brothers Collection? There must be an index somewhere, where I could cross-reference the photo number.

Any thoughts/ideas?
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Cambrian
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Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2006 - 12:26 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

War production would have to be WW1, doubtful he would be using that hook and cup style phone in the 40s.
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Aiw
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Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2006 - 12:51 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You are right. I'm guessing the date on the photo to be about 1925-ish...
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Kkirbitz
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Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2006 - 12:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The factory photo is a lot older than 1925. It looks like the typical etching used on letterheads in the 1890s. Also note how it has slid down in the frame. For that era, it looks to be a pretty large factory complex.
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Cambrian
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Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2006 - 1:09 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The factory photo shows some smaller machines that look like truck engines, possible they are for manufacturing ammo, this is a Munitions factory. Now, is it European or American I wonder, may be even German. I like that big persian rug, those came into vogue in the 1890s.
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Aiw
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Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2006 - 1:23 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree. The factory in the photo is older than the actual photograph.

Cambrian, this photo is from Detroit (or the immediate area). It was stamped on the back with the Manning Brothers Photographers stamp.
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Kathleen
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Posted on Thursday, November 16, 2006 - 2:25 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When I first saw the image, I knew it looked familiar.

My first inclination is Detroit Stove Works..., http://www.detroithistorical.o rg/collections/vewebsite5/exhi bit4/e40041b.htm or http://www.detroithistorical.o rg/collections/vewebsite5/exhi bit4/e40081b.htm

Maybe Michigan Car Works? http://www.detroithistorical.o rg/collections/vewebsite5/exhi bit4/e40069b.htm
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Meliasz
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Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 4:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi! I am new to the forum. WOW!!!

I went through the 22 archived Old Car Factories forums available but I have not found anything on my great-uncle's factory:

Wilson Body - Hastings & Grand Trunk RR [circa 1918] Any info or pics out there?

I'd love to have a Sanborn map image of that area from about that era(1918) and if wishes can come true, Sanborn map image(s)of:

Dublin (near 121) Ave in Hamtramck and Craig St (JUST south of Hamtramck). These streets no longer exist (Poletown Plant, etc.) These are where my grandfather and his brother lived/worked. Thanks!

--mike
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Mjb3
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Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 5:46 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Unbelievable thread! I have been on Detroit Yes for years and never realized all the information available on the OCF pages.

I was wondering if the brain trust out there could give me some history on one of my favorite factory buildings. The address is 5435 W. Fort at the corner of Junction. See link.

Someone once told me it was part of Timken back in the day. It used to have a giant clock at the top but that was sold/stolen by scrappers. I also was told that this was an Albert Kahn building. The city of Detroit website lists it built in 1927. It's been vacant for yrs, listed and re-listed to no avail.

Can anyone tell me more about this bldg? Is it really a Kahn bldg? Thank You.
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Aiw
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Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 8:18 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mjb3. It first shows up on the map from 1921 (the next one back is 1897) as the Roberts Brass Mfg. Co., The next set of maps dates to 1950, and they were still there as the Roberts Brass Co.

000
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Aiw
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Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 8:57 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Meliasz, sorry no luck with a Wilson Body.

Here are the 1921 maps from Hastings @ GTRR.



South West side of the GTRR Jenks & Muir Mfg. Co.



North East side of the GTRR Goodyear Rubber

However up on the Corner of Hastings & EGB is an un-named Auto Body Assembly & Paint shop. It's close to the GTRR, but not next to it.



South East side of the GTRR is the Mansfield Steel Corporation. Manufacturers of Steel Auto Truck Dump Bodies.
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Kathleen
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Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 9:21 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

From OCF #4, Mikem's posting dated March 23, 2005, 12:57am:

"C. R. Wilson Body Company, incorporated 1899. This business was the outgrowth of that started in 1870, when C. R. Wilson came to Detroit and in 1875 began the manufacture of buggy woodwork. In 1876 he was joined by his brother, J. C., and the company was incorporated in 1886 as the C. R. & J. C. Wilson Carriage Woodwork Company. The brother afterward sold his interests in the company and the name became the C. R. Wilson Body Company. C. R. Wilson became interested early in the automobile development, in the manufacture of bodies for the machines, and in this way became connected with the founders of the Ford, Olds, and Cadillac plants. His first work was done for these makers. This company now, which in normal times employs about 2,500 men, has its principal plant located on Clay Avenue and the Grand Trunk Railroad."

http://atdetroit.net/forum/mes sages/6790/40963.html?11119058 86

Also from the Coachbuilt history page on the C.R. Wilson Company and its successors:

"Charles R. Wilson died suddenly in 1924, and faced with an uncertain future and no strong leadership within the firm, so the board of directors approached another Wilson for help.

Although Detroit banker William Robert Wilson shared the same last name as the firm’s recently departed founder and president, they were not related. However, Wilson, who also happened to be the president of Detroit’s Guardian Trust Co., had once been president of the Maxell Motor Corp. and was keenly interested in getting back into the automobile business.

He brokered a deal whereby the C.R. Wilson Body Co., J.W. Murray Mfg. Co., Towson Body Co., and the J.C. Widman Body Co. would merge, forming the Murray Body Corporation under the leadership of John W. Murray. The two larger firms, Wilson and Murray, had longstanding contracts with the Ford Motor Co. and were in good financial shape, and the other two employed craftsmen with specialized skills that would be beneficial to the new firm. Unfortunately, the new firm was in receivership within the year. However they emerged a few months later as the Murray Corp. of America, but that story is continued on the Murray page." The Murray Body Co. building is still standing at Clay and the I-75 service drive.

http://www.coachbuilt.com/bui/ w/wilson_c_r/wilson_c_r.htm

Hope some of this helps clarify the mystery for Meliasz. Welcome to the Forum!!!
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Michigandriveins
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Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 11:48 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Any Ford guys here? Fast forward to more modern times, 1964. LOL This is Dearborn Steel Tubing at 25241 Trowbridge St., where '64 Fairlanes were converted into Thunderbolt drag cars. I'd be interested in finding out more about DST.

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Michigandriveins
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Posted on Friday, December 01, 2006 - 11:49 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Any Ford guys here? Fast forward to more modern times, 1964. LOL This is Dearborn Steel Tubing at 25241 Trowbridge St., where '64 Fairlanes were converted into Thunderbolt drag cars. I'd be interested in finding out more about DST.

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Toolbox
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Posted on Saturday, December 02, 2006 - 1:23 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

DST is still around and located in Romulus. When I was at Ford we would send most test cars to DST after we were finished with them. Once at DST most cars would be scrapped and parts inventoried for later reuse when the need arose in future testing needs.
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Scrippsbooth
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Posted on Monday, December 04, 2006 - 1:20 am:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was looking through some annual reports of the Scripps-Booth Corp which they listed several different plants [they must have rented]in the 1916-1918 period. The address listed are:
960 Lafayette
1320 12th
1884 Mt Elliot
Can anyone locate these old car factories?
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Hornwrecker
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Posted on Monday, December 04, 2006 - 12:38 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The only one I've found so far is the Mt Elliot one, or close to it. No other info on the company than what is below.

S & M Motor Co (1912-1913), 1890 Mt Elliot, less than 40 built
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Meliasz
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Posted on Monday, December 04, 2006 - 3:14 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

AIW - Thank you for the maps!

Kathleen - Thank you for connecting the dots (CR Wilson = Wilson Body) and for the excellent link that provided the background I was looking for (and more).

Fabulous web site and definitely one of the best forums I have EVER encountered [and I thought that BEFORE I got my answers!]
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Sven1977
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Posted on Monday, December 04, 2006 - 5:12 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here's what I have on Scripps on Lincoln. The road is on the right and the tracks are on top. I'm not sure what year the map is from. When I first started taking pictures of the maps, I didn't take notes because I didn't realize how much we would be using the maps as reference.
Scripps on Lincoln
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Sruffing
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Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 1:59 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello! I live in Florida however my great grand father worked and lived in Detroit. According to the 1930 census he was a laborer in an Auto Factory. He, my great grandmother and grandmother lived at 315 Canfield Avenue in Detroit as boarders. According to some research he may have worked at the Ford plants in Dearborn and Rover Rouge(he was filipino and most filipino workers worked at the Ford plants according to this article) Would anyone here know where else he may have worked? Also any information on the Ford plants at that time period. Thank you so much everyone!
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Cambrian
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Username: Cambrian

Post Number: 423
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Friday, December 15, 2006 - 2:04 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is there a way to access a companies archives and see what job's an ancestor had? On this thread are the people who would know. If there is I have a bunch of relative's I would like to research.
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Kkirbitz
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Username: Kkirbitz

Post Number: 10
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 2:47 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sven1977 (or any others) - I have a follow-up question to your post number 200 showing the Sanborn for the Detroit Motor Casting Company. I'm trying to prove definitively whether or not this is one of the Buick & Sherwood plants. I have ads which state Buick & Sherwood operated at 213-219 Beaufait in 1896 and 299-405 Beaufort in 1899. How do these relate to current street numbering? I can't find any reference to a Beaufort Street, so I'm thinking it may be a typo and should be 299-405 Beaufait. Does that relate to 1067 Beaufait today? I had difficulty reading the printing on the Sanborn you had posted. Clarification on this would help me a lot! Also, if anyone has a Sanborn showing 373 Meldrum, that's where David Buick lived in Detroit. Thanks!
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Aiw
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Username: Aiw

Post Number: 6075
Registered: 10-2003
Posted on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 3:35 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When did Buick live on Meldrum?
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56packman
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Username: 56packman

Post Number: 817
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Monday, December 18, 2006 - 5:31 pm:   Edit PostDelete Post   Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Great Holiday wishes for a Merry Christmas (called "holiday" in 2006) and a happy new year from the Packard Motor car company, who invites you to visit your dealer and see the new 1953 models.

53 christmas at EGB

photo from the MSU made in Michigan site, vis-a-vis the Detroit public library NAHC collection

(Message edited by 56packman on December 18, 2006)
Discuss Detroit » Hall of Fame Threads » Old Car Factories » Old Car Factories - 24
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